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Softpedia News / Linux
Updated: 2 min 50 sec ago

SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Service Pack 1 Officially Released, Here's What's New

1 hour 18 min ago
SUSE has announced the general availability of the first Service Pack (SP1) release for their latest and most advanced SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system series.

Released a year ago, the SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 operating system brought numerous new features and enhancements, along with an updated application delivery solution and software-defined infrastructure to help enterprises better adapt and transform their IT departments for their business models. Now, the first Service Pack release is here to further refine the world's first multimodal operating system.

"SUSE Linux Enterprise is a modern and modular OS that helps simplify multimodal IT, making traditional IT infrastructure efficient and providing an engaging platform for developers," said Thomas Di Giacomo, SUSE president of Engineering, Product ... (read more)

KDE Plasma 5.16.2 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 30 Bug Fixes

3 hours 30 min ago
The KDE Project released today the second maintenance update to the latest KDE Plasma 5.16 open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

Coming just one week after the first point release, the KDE Plasma 5.16.2 maintenance update is here to add yet another layer of bug fixes with the ultimate goal to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable for users. In particular, this second point release introduces a total of 34 changes across various core components and apps.

"Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.16.2. Plasma 5.16 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds a week's worth of new transla... (read more)

Canonical Releases Linux Kernel Security Patch for 64-Bit PowerPC Ubuntu Systems

Monday 24th of June 2019 08:44:00 PM
Canonical released today a new Linux kernel security update for several of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases to address a security issue affecting 64-Bit PowerPC systems.

Affecting the Ubuntu 19.04 (Disco Dingo), Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish), and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating systems, the new Linux kernel security patch fixes a vulnerability (CVE-2019-12817) on 64-bit PowerPC (ppc64el) systems, which could allow a local attacker to access memory contents or corrupt the memory of other processes.

"It was discovered that the Linux kernel did not properly separate certain memory mappings when creating new userspace processes on 64-bit Power (ppc64el) systems. A local attacker could use this to access memory contents or cause memory corruption of other processes on the system," reads the security advisory.

Users are urg... (read more)

Canonical Assures Users 32-bit Apps Will Run on Ubuntu 19.10 and Future - Updated

Monday 24th of June 2019 03:00:00 PM
Due to recent escalations, Canonical updated their view on the removal of support for the i386 (32-bit) architecture for Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases to assure users 32-bit apps will still run on the Linux-based operating system.

Last week, Canonical announced that they will completely deprecate support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future Ubuntu Linux releases, starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) operating system, due for release later this fall on October 17th. However, the company mentioned the fact that while 32-bit support is going away, there will still be ways to run 32-bit apps on a 64-bit OS.

As Canonical didn't give more details on the matter at the time of the announcement, many users started complaining about how they will be able to run certain 32-bit apps and game... (read more)

Official Raspberry Pi OS Updated with Raspberry Pi 4 Support, Based on Debian 10

Monday 24th of June 2019 01:55:00 PM
The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced today the release of a new version of the official operating system for the tiny Raspberry Pi single-board computers to support their latest Raspberry Pi 4 release.

With the launch of the Raspberry Pi 4 SBC series, the Raspberry Pi Foundation released a new version of Raspbian OS, the official Raspberry Pi operating system based on the popular Debian GNU/Linux distribution. This release adds numerous new features and improvements, but the biggest change is that it supports the Raspberry Pi 4 Model B single-board computer.

Another major change in the new Raspbian OS release is that the entire operating system has been rebased on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/L... (read more)

Valve Says Steam for Linux Won't Support Ubuntu 19.10 and Future Releases

Monday 24th of June 2019 03:36:00 AM
Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais working on Steam for Linux announced that they will drop support for the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 release, as well as future Ubuntu Linux releases.

Valve's harsh announcement comes just a few days after Canonical's announcement that they will drop support for 32-bit (i386) architectures in Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine). Pierre-Loup Griffais said on Twitter that Steam for Linux won't be officially supported on Ubuntu 19.10, nor any future releases.

The Steam developer also added that Valve will focus their efforts on supporting other Linux-based operating systems for Steam for Linux. They will be looking for a GNU/Linux distribution that still offers support for 32-bit apps, and that they will try to minimize the breakage for Ubuntu users.

"Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not ... (read more)

You Can Now Buy Linux Notebooks Powered by Zorin OS from Star Labs

Friday 21st of June 2019 08:59:00 PM
The makers of the Zorin OS Linux operating system announced today that they partnered with a computer manufacturer to offer users notebooks powered by Zorin OS.

The wait is over, as Zorin OS has partnered with Star Labs, a UK-based computer manufacturer specialised in selling Linux-powered notebooks, to offer you two new laptops running the latest version of Zorin OS, fully customized and optimised for these powerful and slick notebooks.

"Creating a Linux desktop experience that’s accessible to everyone has always been our mission at Zorin OS," reads today's announcement. "Today we’re taking the next step in this mission by making Zorin OS easier for the masses to access: on new computers powered by Zorin OS."

Meet Star LabTop and Star Lite notebooks with Zorin OS 15

Meet the Star LabTop and Star Lite notebooks powered b... (read more)

Ubuntu Linux Gets Intel MDS Mitigations for Intel Sandy Bridge CPUs, Update Now

Friday 21st of June 2019 04:56:00 PM
Canonical released another update for the intel-microcode firmware for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems to address recent Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) security vulnerabilities.

Last month on May 14th, Intel published details about four new security vulnerabilities affecting several of its Intel microprocessor families. The company released updated microcode firmware to mitigate these hardware flaws, which quickly landed in the software repositories of all supported Ubuntu releases, but only some of the processor families were supported.

Last week, intel-microcode firmware updates arrived in Ubuntu's repositories to mitigate these new security vulnerabilities on systems using read more)

GNOME Asia Summit 2019 Announced for GNOME 3.36 "Gresik" Desktop in Indonesia

Friday 21st of June 2019 02:55:00 PM
The GNOME Foundation announced the official dates for their summer developer and user conference, GNOME Asia Summit 2019, which will take place later this fall in Indonesia.

Every year, the GNOME developers and contributors gather together for the GUADEC (GNOME Users And Developers European Conference) and GNOME Asia Summit events to plan the next major release of their beloved, open-source desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

While the GUADEC 2019 conference will kick off this summer between August 23rd and 28th, in Thessaloniki, Greece, for the upcoming GNOME 3.34 "Thessaloniki" desktop environment, the GNOME Asia Summit 2019 event will take place between October 11th and 13th, 2019, in Gresik, Indonesia.

The GNOME Asia Summit 2019 conference will be held at the Universitas Muhammadiyah Gresik (UMG) for the GNOME 3.36 desktop environment, whi... (read more)

CentOS 7 and RHEL 7 Get Important Linux Kernel Update to Patch SACK Panic Flaws

Friday 21st of June 2019 02:18:00 PM
The Red Hat Enterprise Linux and CentOS Linux operating systems have received new Linux kernel security updates that are marked as important and address the recently disclosed TCP vulnerabilities affecting all GNU/Linux distributions.

The new Linux kernel security updates patch an integer overflow flaw (CVE-2019-11477) discovered by Jonathan Looney in Linux kernel's networking subsystem processed TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACK) segments, which could allow a remote attacker to cause a so-called SACK Panic attack (denial of service) by sending malicious sequences of SACK segments on a TCP connection that has a small TCP MSS value.

"While processing SACK segments, the Linux kernel's socket buffer (SKB) data structure becomes fragmented," reads Red Hat's security advisory. "Each fragment is about TCP maximum segment size (MSS) byt... (read more)

Debian's Intel MDS Mitigations Are Available for Sandy Bridge Server/Core-X CPUs

Thursday 20th of June 2019 04:51:00 PM
The Debian Project recently announced the general availability of a new security update for the intel-microcode firmware to patch the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) vulnerabilities on more Intel CPUs.

Last month, on May 14th, Intel disclosed four new security vulnerabilities affecting many of its Intel microprocessor families. The tech giant was quick to release updated microcode firmware to mitigate these flaws, but not all the processor families were patched.

Therefore, the Debian Project has now released a new version of the intel-microcode firmware to mitigate the Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) hardware vulnerabilities, including (CVE-2018-12126 (MSBDS), read more)

Security-Oriented Alpine Linux Receives Serial & Ethernet Support for ARM Boards

Thursday 20th of June 2019 03:17:00 PM
Natanael Copa's security-oriented Alpine Linux operating system has been updated to version 3.10.0, a major release that brings several new features, various improvements and bug fixes, as well as lots of updated components.

Alpine Linux 3.10.0 has been released and it is now available as the latest and most advanced stable version of the security-oriented operating system based on the musl libc libraries, and using the powerful and open-source BusyBox utility for general system administration.

It brings the cross-desktop LightDM display manager, the Ceph distributed object store and file system, and iwd (iNet wireless daemon) as a replacement for wpa_supplicant, though Extensible Authentication Protocol (EAP) support isn't working in this release. It also adds serial and Ethernet support for ARM boards.

Now powered by Linux kernel 4.19 and GCC 8.3

Powered by the Linux 4.... (read more)

Canonical Outs New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and 16.04 LTS

Thursday 20th of June 2019 01:44:00 PM
Canonical released a new Linux kernel live patch for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system series to address the recently disclosed TCP Denial of Service (DoS) vulnerabilities.

Coming hot on the heels of the recent Linux kernel security updates published earlier this week for all supported Ubuntu releases, the new Linux kernel live patch is only targeted at Ubuntu versions that support the kernel live patch and are long-term supported, including Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus).

And it's here to address the same two security vulnerabilities (CVE-2019-11477 and read more)

KDE Plasma 5.16 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, Update Now

Wednesday 19th of June 2019 02:05:00 PM
The KDE Project released today the first maintenance update to the recently released KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment for Linux-based operating systems.

KDE Plasma 5.16.1 is now available only one week after the release of the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment series, a major version that adds numerous new features and improvements, including a totally revamped notifications system, new look and feel for the login, lock, and logout screens, better Wayland support, as well as numerous other desktop enhancements.

Consisting of a total of 21 bug fixes, the KDE Plasma 5.16.1 maintenance update is here to make the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment more stable and reliable by addressing various issues reported by users lately, including an issue that broke the Sleep/Suspend command, and the ability for the Plasma Dis... (read more)

OpenMandriva Linux 4.0 Operating System Officially Released, Here's What's New

Tuesday 18th of June 2019 09:41:00 PM
The OpenMandriva community announced the general availability of the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 operating system, a major release that brings numerous new features, updated components, and lots of improvements.

After almost two years in development, the OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 operating system is finally here and comes with numerous goodies for fans of the popular Linux bistro that continues the sprit of the now deprecated Mandriva and Mandrake Linux operating systems.

Compiled with LLVM/Clang instead of GCC (GNU Compiler Collection), OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 aims to be a cutting-edge Linux-based operating system that offers some of the highest levels of optimization by enabling LTO in certain packages to make it fast, stable, and reliable at all times.

This release brings dozens of updated components and new features, but most importantly better hardware support b... (read more)

Canonical Outs Important Linux Kernel Security Update for All Ubuntu Releases

Tuesday 18th of June 2019 09:01:00 PM
Canonical has released an important Linux kernel security update for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases to address two critical security vulnerabilities that could crash users' systems.

In a recent security advisory, Canonical details two recently discovered security vulnerabilities (CVE-2019-11477 and CVE-2019-11478) affecting Linux kernel's TCP retransmission queue implementation when handling some specific TCP Selective Acknowledgment (SACKs). 

Both security vulnerabilities were discovered by Jonathan Looney and could allow a remote attacker to crash the affected system by causing a denial of service. Known as SACK Panic, they affect all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, including Ubuntu 19.04, Ubuntu 18.10, Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

"Jonathan Looney discovered several flaws in the way that t... (read more)

Canonical Will Drop Support for 32-bit Architectures in Future Ubuntu Releases

Tuesday 18th of June 2019 08:21:00 PM
Canonical announced today that it finally decided to completely drop support for 32-bit (i386) hardware architectures in future releases of its popular Ubuntu Linux operating system.

Last year, during the development cycle of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series, Canonical announced that they won't offer 32-bit installation images (ISOs), a trend that was shortly followed by all official Ubuntu Linux flavors with the Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) release. However, Ubuntu's 32-bit repositories were still available.

As Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) will be supported for the next five years, Canonical disabled upgrades from Ubuntu 18.04 LTS to Ubuntu 18.10 for 32-bit systems to avoid leaving users on a short-lived release, and now, they announced that starting with the upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 (Eoan Ermine) release, support for 32-bit system will no longer be provided.

"The Ubuntu engineering team has reviewed the facts before us and conclu... (read more)

Microsoft Edge for Linux: A Browser the Software Giant “Would Like to Do”

Friday 14th of June 2019 07:36:00 AM
Microsoft announced in late 2018 that it’d switch Edge browser to the Chromium engine, the same one that’s being used by Google Chrome.

This decision technically allows Microsoft to convert Microsoft Edge from a Windows 10-exclusive browser to a cross-platform application.

The company has already confirmed Microsoft Edge would be released beyond Windows 10, and existing preview builds also allow the browser to be installed on macOS.

The migration to Chromium would technically allow the company to bring Edge to Linux as well, and given its efforts to get more involved in the open-source world, such a release wouldn’t be surprising at all.

Linux version possible in the long term

And after Microsoft suggested that it’s indeed considering a Linux version of Edge back in May at the Build developer conference, the Edge tea... (read more)

Atari VCS Linux-Powered Gaming Console Is Now Available For Pre-Order for $249

Wednesday 12th of June 2019 06:05:00 PM
After last year's successful Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign, Atari announced that its long-anticipated Atari VCS retro gaming console is now finally available for online pre-orders at various online retail and Atari's official web store.

Atari issued a press release on Tuesday to announce that after many trials and tribulations it finally has a release date for the official launch of its Atari VCS retro gaming console, along with a release date for those who backed the project during its early days, as well as information about the first key retail partnerships that will have the console ready for pre-order starting today.

"Atari made a commitment to its fans to make the new VCS the best and most versatile game and home entertainm... (read more)

Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" Operating System to Be Released on July 6th, 2019

Wednesday 12th of June 2019 04:10:00 PM
The Debian Project announced the proposed release date of their long-anticipated Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system, a major release that brings many new features and enhancements.

Work on the Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" operating system series started two years ago, since early July 2017, a couple of weeks after the release of the Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" series, which is currently the latest stable version and with nine point releases already out the door.

Now, two years later, we finally have an official release date for Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster," which appears to hit the streets as soon as next month. Debian Project's Niels Thykier wrote in a recent mailing list announcement that they plan to release Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" on July 6th, 2019.

"We plan to release on 2019-07-06," said Niels Thykier on behalf of the Debian release team. "In the last week pri... (read more)

More in Tux Machines

Deprecating a.out Binaries

Remember a.out binaries? They were the file format of the Linux kernel till around 1995 when ELF took over. ELF is better. It allows you to load shared libraries anywhere in memory, while a.out binaries need you to register shared library locations. That's fine at small scales, but it gets to be more and more of a headache as you have more and more shared libraries to deal with. But a.out is still supported in the Linux source tree, 25 years after ELF became the standard default format. Recently, Borislav Petkov recommended deprecating it in the source tree, with the idea of removing it if it turned out there were no remaining users. He posted a patch to implement the deprecation. Alan Cox also remarked that "in the unlikely event that someone actually has an a.out binary they can't live with, they can also just write an a.out loader as an ELF program entirely in userspace." Read more

An easier way to test Plasma

Having the Plasma and Usability & Productivity sprints held at the same time and place had an unexpected benefit: we were able to come up with a way to make it easier to test a custom-compiled version of Plasma! Previously, we had some documentation that asked people to create a shell script on their computers, copy files to various locations, and perform a few other steps. Unfortunately, many of the details were out of date, and the whole process was quite error-prone. It turned out that almost none of the Plasma developers at the sprint were actually using this method, and each had cobbled together something for themselves. Some (including myself) had given up on it and were doing Plasma development in a virtual machine. So we put some time into easing this pain by making Plasma itself produce all the right pieces automatically when compiled from source. Then, we created a simple script to install everything properly. Read more

Benchmarking The Experimental Bcachefs File-System Against Btrfs, EXT4, F2FS, XFS & ZFS

Bcachefs is the file-system born out of the Linux kernel's block cache code and has been worked on the past several years by developer Kent Overstreet. Our most recent benchmarking of Bcachefs was last year, so with the prospects of Bcachefs potentially being staged soon in the mainline Linux kernel, I ran some benchmarks using the latest kernel code for this next-generation file-system. Those unfamiliar with this copy-on-write file-system can learn more at Bcachefs.org. The design features of this file-system are similar to ZFS/Btrfs and include native encryption, snapshots, compression, caching, multi-device/RAID support, and more. But even with all of its features, it aims to offer XFS/EXT4-like performance, which is something that can't generally be said for Btrfs. Read more

Games: TheoTown, Prison Architect and More

  • Retro themed city-builder 'TheoTown' has now added Linux support

    TheoTown, developed by blueflower is a city-builder with a retro style that looks to be inspired by the classic Sim City 2000 and it's now available on Steam for Linux. Released on Steam earlier this month, TheoTown is also available on mobile but the PC version is a full and proper game with no in-app purchase nonsense. On Android at least, the game is very highly rated and I imagine a number of readers have played it there so now you can pick it up again on your Linux PC and continue building the city of your dreams. So far, the Steam user reviews are also giving it a good overall picture.

  • Reminder: Update your PC info for the next round of statistics updates

    This is your once a month reminder to make sure your PC information is correct on your user profiles. A fresh batch of statistics is generated on the 1st of each month.

  • Prison Architect gains a new warden with Double Eleven, free update incoming

    After Paradox Interactive acquired the rights to Prison Architect from Introversion Software, they've now announced that Double Eleven will be handling future updates. Double Eleven are a well-known developer and publisher of quite a number of titles, with them also previously been responsible for the console versions of Prison Architect so it seems like a pretty good fit as they already worked with the game.

  • Steam To Drop Support For Ubuntu

    Ubuntu is the most popular Linux distribution and that’s why it gets the attention of big companies like steam to design software for it. But recently, Linux community is kind of unhappy over Canonical decision on dropping Ubuntu 32-bit packages. The community already discussed that in case Ubuntu drops 32-bit packages support in upcoming Ubuntu 19.10 or future releases, it’d create big problems including Wine users and Linux gamers. And here comes the first news from Steam, the gaming platform. Pierre-Loup Griffais from Valve tweeted that Ubuntu 19.10 or any future Ubuntu releases will not be officially supported by Steam. He also said that the team will work on to minimize the breakage for existing users and thinking to focus on any other Linux distribution.

  • Canonical to Continue Building Selected 32-Bit i386 Packages for Ubuntu 19.10, Azul Systems Announces Zulu Mission Control v7.0, Elisa v. 0.4.1 Now Available, Firefox Adds Fission to the Nightly Build and Tails Emergency Release

    After much feedback from the community, Canonical yesterday announced it will continue to build selected 32-bit i386 packages for Ubuntu 19.10 and 20.04 LTS. The statement notes that Canonical "will also work with the WINE, Ubuntu Studio and gaming communities to use container technology to address the ultimate end of life of 32-bit libraries; it should stay possible to run old applications on newer versions of Ubuntu. Snaps and LXD enable us both to have complete 32-bit environments, and bundled libraries, to solve these issues in the long term."

  • OpenVIII, an in-development open source game engine for Final Fantasy VIII

    Any fans of Final Fantasy VIII reading? You're going to want to keep an eye on the in-development game engine OpenVIII. While it doesn't seem like it's currently playable, plenty of work has already gone into OpenVIII to work with "video support, music support, audio support, in-game menu" and more. The project is currently classed by the developer as a "pre-prototype" so don't go getting any hopes up yet about playing Final Fantasy VIII natively on Linux.

  • Littlewood hasn't been out for long, but this peaceful RPG has a lot to like about it

    Entering Early Access last week, Sean Young's peaceful RPG Littlewood is a game for those who like to relax a little. Note: Key provided directly by the developer. What happens after the world has been saved, after all the major battles have already been fought? That's exactly what Littlewood is all about, you saved the world and lost your memory so you're helping to re-build the town. In some ways, it actually reminds me of my experience with Forager. It's small, it's sweet and it doesn't feel like it's constantly begging for attention. Quite different in setting though of course, more along the lines of Stardew Valley but with less emphasis on constant farming. I love the building interface too, while it's quite simplistic it allows you to pick up trees, stones and move everything out of your way. Nothing feels annoying, so it's really sweet.

  • Cyberspace first-person shooter 'Black Ice' just had a massive upgrade

    Currently in Early Access, it has been a long time since Black Ice had an update to the "stable" version but the developer hasn't been sat idle. A massive update to the entire game just landed. Featuring some of what I showed off recently, Black Ice has come a very long was since the initial few releases making it a vastly more interesting game. One of the biggest changes, is an overhaul to the entire world design full of new areas, combat arenas with even more to come. Additionally, there's now some random events that will happen to also make the world seem a bit more lively. One server might try to hack another, so you can jump in and fight them all or sit back and watch the fireworks.