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FSF Fiscal Year 2017 Annual Report now available

Monday 11th of February 2019 07:25:00 PM

The report is viewable as a Web site or high resolution PDF.

The Annual Report reviews the FSF's activities, accomplishments, and financial picture from October 1, 2016 to September 30, 2017. It is the result of a full external financial audit, along with a focused study of program results. It examines the impact of the FSF's events, programs, and activities, including the annual LibrePlanet conference, the Respects Your Freedom (RYF) hardware certification program, and the fight against Digital Restrictions Management (DRM).

"Software filters the information we receive about the world, the messages we put out into the world, and even the way we physically move in the world," said FSF executive director John Sullivan in his introduction to the FY2017 report. "If the software is not free 'as in freedom'... the consequences for the rest of us will be loss of democracy, privacy, security, freedom of speech, freedom of movement -- and even loss of life."

The FSF publishes its financials and annual report as part of their commitment to transparency. Along with its strong financial health, accountability and transparency are the reasons the FSF is a Charity Navigator Four Star Charity.

As with all of the Foundation's activities, the Annual Report was made using free software, including Pelican, Scribus, GIMP, and Inkscape, along with freely licensed fonts and images. If you would like a printed copy of the Annual Report, or have any questions or comments, please email campaigns@fsf.org.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to run, change, share, and contribute to computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://fsf.org and https://gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contact

Molly de Blanc
Campaigns Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

Vikings D8 Mainboard and D8 Workstation now FSF-certified to Respect Your Freedom

Thursday 7th of February 2019 08:25:00 PM

These are the [fourth and fifth devices] from Vikings to receive RYF certification. The Vikings D8 Mainboard is an ASUS KCMA-D8 that comes with Trisquel GNU/Linux. Like the previously certified Vikings D16, it is a powerful mainboard suitable for use as a workstation or server. The Vikings D8 Workstation brings the D8 Mainboard together with a variety of options to provide a robust workstation for users. Both are available for purchase at https://store.vikings.net.

"The more options users have for RYF-certified mainboards, the easier it is for them to build a machine that is completely under their control. Having an already assembled workstation available as an option is also a great improvement to the program. This is an area in which we hope to see continued growth, so that every user can get what they want when it comes to a server or workstation," said the FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Donald Robertson, III.

Vikings received their first three certifications in spring of 2017, and has steadily worked to continue offering new RYF-certifiable devices.

"When we announced the first certifications for Vikings we knew they would be back soon with even more. Vikings is building an impressive lineup of freedom-respecting hardware and we're excited to see the D8 Mainboard and Workstation as their latest additions," said the FSF's executive director, John Sullivan.

"The Vikings Store is dedicated to helping users purchase ready to go, libre-friendly systems. Together with the Free Software Foundation, we have put a lot of effort into offering a high-performance, owner-controllable system at an affordable price. This machine is aimed at the security-conscious, as well as users who prefer a computer that runs free software from the ground up as an ethical choice. That is why we are pleased to see the Vikings D8 Workstation receive RYF certification. We would like to thank Timothy Pearson of Raptor Engineering, Inc. for their reverse engineering and porting work which laid the very foundation for making this possible," said Vikings CEO Thomas Umbach.

To learn more about the Respects Your Freedom certification program, including details on the certification of the Vikings D8 Workstation and Mainboard, please visit https://fsf.org/ryf.

Hardware sellers interested in applying for certification can consult https://www.fsf.org/resources/hw/endorsement/criteria.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://fsf.org and https://gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About Vikings

Vikings ships libre-friendly hardware world-wide and has an ever-growing number of FSF RYF certfified devices that truly respects your freedom. Vikings is also the world's first libre-friendly hosting company running on fully libre hosting software and a libre-friendly and owner-controllable hardware platform. All services are based on 100% libre software and are powered by 100% certified green energy.

Media Contacts

Donald Robertson, III
Licensing and Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Vikings GmbH
Thomas Umbach
+49 69 247 54 91 0
hello@vikings.net
https://www.vikings.net/
https://store.vikings.net/

Updated on February 11th, 2019, to correct some details.

Image by Vikings GmbH is licensed under a CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain Dedication license.

FSF adds Hyperbola GNU/Linux-libre to list of endorsed GNU/Linux distributions

Thursday 6th of December 2018 09:15:24 PM

The FSF's list showcases GNU/Linux operating system distributions whose developers have made a commitment to follow its Guidelines for Free System Distributions. Each one includes and endorses exclusively free "as in freedom" software.

After a thorough vetting process, the FSF concluded that Hyperbola, a long-term support simplicity-focused distribution based on Arch GNU/Linux, meets these criteria.

"In a world where proprietary operating systems continually up the ante in terms of the abuse they heap on their users, adding another distribution to the list of fully free systems is a welcome development. Hyperbola represents another safe home for users looking for complete control over their own computing," said John Sullivan, FSF's executive director.

"Hyperbola is a fully free distribution based on Arch snapshots and Debian development without nonfree software, documentation, or any type of support for the installation or execution of nonfree software. Unlike Arch, which is a rolling release distribution, Hyperbola is a long-term one focused on stability and security inspired from Debian and Devuan," said André Silva, Hyperbola co-founder and developer.

FSF's licensing and compliance manager, Donald Robertson, added, "It was a pleasure working with the team behind Hyperbola throughout this process. They really go above and beyond in terms of looking out for the rights of their users. "

Hyperbola joins a growing list of distributions that users can trust. More information about Hyperbola, and how volunteers can get involved, is available at https://www.hyperbola.info/.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to run, edit, share, and contribute to computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://fsf.org and https://gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

About the GNU Operating System and Linux

Richard Stallman announced in September 1983 the plan to develop a free software Unix-like operating system called GNU. GNU is the only operating system developed specifically for the sake of users' freedom. See https://www.gnu.org/gnu/the-gnu-project.html.

In 1992, the essential components of GNU were complete, except for one, the kernel. When in 1992 the kernel Linux was re-released under the GNU GPL, making it free software, the combination of GNU and Linux formed a complete free operating system, which made it possible for the first time to run a PC without nonfree software. This combination is the GNU/Linux system. For more explanation, see https://www.gnu.org/gnu/gnu-linux-faq.html.

Media Contacts

Donald Robertson, III
Licensing & Compliance Manager
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
licensing@fsf.org

Hyperbola GNU/Linux-libre logo, Copyright 2017-2018 Hyperbola Project released under the CC-BY-SA 4.0 license.

Free Software Foundation receives $1 million from Handshake

Monday 3rd of December 2018 06:10:00 PM

BOSTON, Massachusetts, USA -- Monday, December 3rd, 2018 -- The Free Software Foundation (FSF) announced it has received several earmarked charitable donations from Handshake, an organization developing an experimental peer-to-peer root domain naming system, totaling $1 million. These gifts will support the FSF's organizational capacity, including its advocacy, education, and licensing initiatives, as well as specific projects fiscally sponsored by the FSF.

John Sullivan, FSF's executive director, said, "Building on the $1 million Bitcoin gift from the Pineapple Fund earlier this year, and our record high number of individual associate members, it is clear that software freedom is more important than ever to the world. We are now at a pivotal moment in our history, on the cusp of making free software the 'kitchen table issue' it must be. Thanks to Handshake and our members, the Free Software Foundation looks forward to scaling to the next level of free software activism, development, and community."

Rob Myers of Handshake said, "The FSF is a worldwide leader in the fight to protect the rights of all computer users through its support for the production of free software, including the GNU operating system and its campaigns to raise awareness such as Defective by Design. Handshake is proud to be able to support the FSF in its important work to secure our freedom."

These significant contributions from Handshake will fuel the FSF's efforts with activists, developers, and lawyers around the world. They include:

  • $400,000 for the FSF's organizational capacity, publications, licensing, and activist initiatives;

  • $200,000 for Replicant, the fully free mobile operating system based on Android;

  • $100,000 for GNU Guix and GuixSD, a package manager supporting transactional upgrades and roll-backs, unprivileged package management, per-user profiles, and more, as well as a distribution of the GNU operating system using that package manager;

  • $100,000 for GNU Octave, a high-level language, primarily intended for numerical computations;

  • $100,000 to help the GNU Project address important threats like nonfree JavaScript; and

  • $100,000 for the GNU Toolchain, which provides the foundational software components of the GNU/Linux system and the Internet.

Replicant developer Denis "GNUtoo" Carikli said, "So far, Replicant development has been driven by very few individuals contributing to it in their free time. Donations have been used to enable Replicant developers to buy new devices to port Replicant on, and to enable new Replicant developers to work on already-supported devices. They were also used to enable developers to attend conferences to promote Replicant and try to find new contributors. The kind of amount we received will enable Replicant to fund development, first to fix the most critical bugs, and then to upstream most of its code, making it more sustainable, and also enabling other projects to reuse Replicant's work to improve users' freedom."

Guix developer and project committee member Ricardo Wurmus said, "This donation allows the GNU Guix project to guarantee its independence, invest in hardware, and develop new features to benefit all our users. We'll be able to grow the performance and reliability of our existing infrastructure. We also envision better support for new and liberating architectures, and more resilient long-term storage of binaries and source code. It will also allow us to continue our outreach efforts and attract new interns to further improve and promote the project."

John W. Eaton, original author and primary maintainer of GNU Octave, said, "We are grateful for such a generous donation. It is by far the single largest monetary contribution we have ever received, and we thank Handshake for including Octave in this select group. We have only begun to imagine how these funds might impact Octave, but given the size of the gift, we intend something transformational and previously impossible."

David Edelsohn, founding GCC Steering Committee member and GNU Toolchain Fund trustee, said "We are incredibly gratified by the confidence in and support for the GNU Toolchain demonstrated by this donation. This donation will allow the project to greatly expand its outreach to students and new developers. It allows us to move forward on a number of fronts with confidence that we have the resources to match our imagination."

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to run, change, share, and contribute to computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://fsf.org and https://gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. Its headquarters are in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

Media Contact

John Sullivan
Executive Director
Free Software Foundation
+1 (617) 542 5942
campaigns@fsf.org

FSF job opportunity: web developer

Friday 9th of November 2018 06:25:00 PM

The Free Software Foundation (FSF), a Massachusetts 501(c)(3) charity with a worldwide mission to protect computer user freedom, seeks a motivated and talented Boston-based individual to be our full-time web developer.

This position, reporting to the executive director, works closely with our sysadmin team and chief technology officer to maintain and improve the FSF's Web presence. The FSF uses several different free software Web platforms in the course of our work, both internally and externally. These platforms are critical to work supporting the GNU Project, free software adoption, free media formats, and freedom on the Internet; and to opposing bulk surveillance, Digital Restrictions Management, software patents, and proprietary software.

We are looking for someone who is comfortable with keeping these systems up-to-date and working, as well as customizing them when necessary. While the main duties will relate to the backend systems, frontend experience with templates, HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and design tools will be a big plus. The web developer will help lead major projects, such as the relaunch of https://www.fsf.org and migration of https://audio-video.gnu.org to GNU MediaGoblin. They will also be part of the team running the annual LibrePlanet conference, and contribute to decisions about which new platforms to use or which existing ones to retire.

Examples of platforms maintained by the web developer include, but are not limited to:

  • CiviCRM
  • Drupal
  • MediaWiki
  • Plone / Zope
  • Ikiwiki
  • Request Tracker
  • Etherpad
  • CAS
  • GNU social
  • GNU MediaGoblin
  • Icecast

Because the FSF works globally and seeks to have our materials distributed in as many languages as possible, multilingual candidates will have an advantage. With our small staff of fourteen, each person makes a clear contribution. We work hard, but offer a humane and fun work environment at an office located in the heart of downtown Boston.

The FSF is a mature but growing organization that provides great potential for advancement; existing staff get the first chance at any new job openings. This position is also a good starting point for anyone who might be interested in other roles on our technical team in the future.

Benefits and salary

This job is a union position that must be worked on-site at the FSF's downtown Boston office. The salary is fixed at $53,269/year, and is non-negotiable. Benefits include:

  • fully subsidized individual or family health coverage through Blue Cross Blue Shield;
  • partially subsidized dental plan;
  • four weeks of paid vacation annually;
  • seventeen paid holidays annually;
  • weekly remote work allowance;
  • public transit commuting cost reimbursement;
  • 403(b) program with employer match;
  • yearly cost-of-living pay increases based on government guidelines;
  • health care expense reimbursement;
  • ergonomic budget;
  • relocation (to Boston area) expense reimbursement;
  • conference travel and professional development opportunities; and
  • potential for an annual performance bonus.
Application instructions

Applications must be submitted via email to hiring@fsf.org. The email must contain the subject line "web developer." A complete application should include:

  • resume;
  • cover letter; and
  • links to any previous work online.

All materials must be in a free format. Email submissions that do not follow these instructions will probably be overlooked. No phone calls or paper applications, please.

Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until the position is filled. To guarantee consideration, submit your application by Friday, November 30, 2018.

The FSF is an equal opportunity employer and will not discriminate against any employee or application for employment on the basis of race, color, marital status, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, handicap, or any other legally protected status recognized by federal, state or local law. We value diversity in our workplace. Women, people of color and LGBTQ individuals are strongly encouraged to apply.

About the Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation, founded in 1985, is dedicated to promoting computer users' right to use, study, copy, modify, and redistribute computer programs. The FSF promotes the development and use of free (as in freedom) software -- particularly the GNU operating system and its GNU/Linux variants -- and free documentation for free software. The FSF also helps to spread awareness of the ethical and political issues of freedom in the use of software, and its Web sites, located at https://www.fsf.org and https://www.gnu.org, are an important source of information about GNU/Linux. Donations to support the FSF's work can be made at https://donate.fsf.org. We are based in Boston, MA, USA.

More information about the FSF, as well as important information for journalists and publishers, is at https://www.fsf.org/press.

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