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Updated: 2 days 22 hours ago

Wine on Wayland: An exciting first update

Friday 19th of February 2021 10:17:00 AM
Two months ago we announced a first proposal for a Wayland driver for Wine, the compatibility layer for Windows applications. Here's an update on this effort, which contains more details and instructions for building and running the Wayland driver.

New year, new kernel: Collabora's contributions to Linux 5.11

Wednesday 17th of February 2021 03:13:00 PM
The first kernel release of 2021 brings a number of highlights contributed by Collaborans, including the new Syscall User Dispatch mechanism, and the destaging of both the H.264 stateless decoding interface and the Rockchip ISP driver.

Adding HEVC/H.265 support for NXP's i.MX 8M

Wednesday 17th of February 2021 11:54:00 AM
Our recent efforts on the Hantro kernel driver have resulted in the addition of H.264 decoding support and multiple performance improvements. We are now introducing High Efficiency Video Coding, also known as H.265, decoding support on NXP's i.MX8 M.

Monado 21.0.0, an officially conformant OpenXR implementation!

Monday 15th of February 2021 02:12:00 PM
Monado, the OpenXR runtime for Linux, is now officially conformant! In recognition of this milestone, a first major release version of the OpenXR runtime for Linux is now available, bringing with it a SteamVR driver!

Network adaptive streaming with Hwangsaeul

Monday 8th of February 2021 01:34:00 PM
Hwangsaeul, or H8L, a remote surveillance streaming solution, utilizes the capability of libsrt to collect statistics from open SRT sockets and by continuously analyzing the available data tries to detect potential connectivity issues.

Trimming apitrace workload captures for better Mesa testing

Monday 1st of February 2021 03:16:00 PM
Complex, real-world correctness tests and performance analysis are now possible thanks to gltrim, a new tool recently added to apitrace, designed to trim replayable traces to single, user-defined frames.

GStreamer on Windows: adding WebRTC support to a gst-build install

Thursday 28th of January 2021 01:05:00 PM
Earlier this week, WebRTC became an official W3C and IETF standard. GStreamer has a powerful and rapidly maturing WebRTC implementation. So, the obvious question is: how do we build this on Windows?

Implementing a performance boosting algorithm in Coccinelle

Thursday 21st of January 2021 11:39:00 AM
Last year, from June to September, I worked on the kernel development tool Coccinelle under Collabora. I implemented a performance boosting algorithm for one of Coccinelle's use cases. Here's a look at this work.

One weekend, two conferences

Tuesday 19th of January 2021 03:28:00 PM
Join us as our 2021 conference schedule gets underway this weekend with the virtual editions of linux.conf.au and MiniDebConf India! Collaborans will be giving talks on recent projects including futex2, and Open Source AI video analytics with Panfrost.

Desktop OpenGL 3.1 on Mali GPUs with Panfrost

Wednesday 13th of January 2021 12:54:00 PM
The open source Panfrost driver for Arm Mali Midgard and Bifrost GPUs now provides non-conformant OpenGL ES 3.0 on Bifrost and desktop OpenGL 3.1 on Midgard (Mali T760 and newer) and Bifrost, in time for Mesa's first release of 2021.

A Wayland driver for Wine

Tuesday 15th of December 2020 12:14:00 PM
After several months of work, we are excited to announce a first proposal for a Wayland driver for Wine. The proposal is in the form of an RFC, in order to explore how to best move forward with the upstreaming and further development of the driver.

Kernel 5.10: Rockchip, H.264, Bifrost & more!

Monday 14th of December 2020 10:45:00 AM
Even amidst the chaos and uncertainty that 2020 brought, Linux Kernel development keeps moving forward at a constant and relentless pace. Collabora remains active, developing, maintaining, documenting and testing many parts of the kernel.

Empathy first: Driving growth through people leadership

Monday 30th of November 2020 07:32:35 PM
This year, the global pandemic has put a strain on us all. Motivation can become hard to maintain, worries can cloud our minds. Now more than ever, it is important to try and connect with our colleagues.

Developing Wayland Color Management and High Dynamic Range

Thursday 19th of November 2020 01:48:00 PM
Wayland is still lacking proper consideration for color management & support for high dynamic range (HDR) imagery. However, a group of developers has begun an effort to fix this situation. This is their story.

Linux App Summit 2020

Thursday 12th of November 2020 11:58:00 AM
Starting today, and running until Saturday, join us at Linux App Summit for a look at Linux graphics, PipeWire, our work with Valve, and a virtual office hour with our Engineering Manager!

A summer sprint: bringing near-native performance to Zink

Friday 6th of November 2020 02:08:00 PM
This week marks two years since the OpenGL implementation on Vulkan was initially announced. Since then, and especially over the past few months, much has progressed with many new features being added and performance now close to native (95%!).

From Panfrost to production, a tale of Open Source graphics

Tuesday 3rd of November 2020 01:47:00 PM
Since our previous update on Panfrost, the open source stack for Arm's Mali Midgard and Bifrost GPUs, we've focused on taking our driver from its reverse-engineered origins on Midgard to a mature stack.

Monado update: Passing conformance, Android support & more

Monday 2nd of November 2020 02:51:00 PM
Monado 0.4 OpenXR runtime introduces initial support for Android and passes all of the OpenXR conformance tests with both OpenGL and Vulkan on desktop with a simulated device.

More in Tux Machines

4 new open source licenses

As the steward of the Open Source Defintion, the Open Source Initiative has been designating licenses as "open source" for over 20 years. These licenses are the foundation of the open source software ecosystem, ensuring that everyone can use, improve, and share software. When a license is approved, it is because the OSI believes that the license fosters collaboration and sharing for the benefit of everyone who participates in the ecosystem. The world has changed over the past 20 years, with software now used in new and even unimaginable ways. The OSI has seen that the familiar open source licenses are not always well-suited for these new situations. But license stewards have stepped up, submitting several new licenses for more expansive uses. The OSI was challenged to evaluate whether these new concepts in licensing would continue to advance sharing and collaboration and merit being referred to as "open source" licenses, ultimately approving some new special purpose licenses. Read more

Stunning GNOME 40 Beta is Ready. Download and Test Now!

The GNOME team announced the availability of the official GNOME 40 Beta images in an email announcement. You can download and try the images now to experience the design overhaul. Read more

Can Linux Run Video Games?

Linux is a widely used and popular open source operating system that was first released back in 1991. It differs from operating systems like Windows and macOS in that it is open source and it is highly customizable through its use of “distributions”. Distributions or “distros” are basically different versions of Linux that can be installed along with the Linux core software so that users can customize their system to fit their specific need. Some of the more popular Linux distributions are Ubuntu, Debian and Fedora. For many years Linux had the reputation of being a terrible gaming platform and it was believed that users wouldn’t be able to engage in this popular form of entertainment. The main reason for this is that commercially successful games just weren’t being developed for Linux. A few well known video game titles like Doom, Quake and SimCity made it to Linux but for the most part they were overlooked through the 1990’s. However, things have changed a lot since then and there is an every expanding library of popular video games you can play on Linux. [...] There are plenty of Windows games you can run on Linux and no reason why you can’t play as well as you do when using Windows. If you are having trouble leveling up or winning the best loot, consider trying AskBoosters for help with your game. Aside from native Linux games and Windows games there are a huge amount of browser based games that work on any system including Linux. Read more

Security: DFI and Canonical, IBM/Red Hat/CentOS and Oracle, Malware in GitHub

  • DFI and Canonical offer risk-free system updates and reduced software lead times for the IoT ecosystem

    DFI and Canonical signed the Ubuntu IoT Hardware Certification Partner Program. DFI is the world’s first industrial computer manufacturer to join the program aimed at offering Ubuntu-certified IoT hardware ready for the over-the-air software update. The online update mechanism of and the authorized DFI online application store combines with DFI’s products’ application flexibility, to reduce software and hardware development time to deploy new services. DFI’s RemoGuard IoT solution will provide real-time monitoring and partition-level system recovery through out-of-band management technology. In addition to the Ubuntu online software update, RemoGuard avoids service interruption, reduces maintenance personnel costs, and response time to establish a seamless IoT ecosystem. From the booming 5G mobile network to industrial robot applications, a large number of small base stations, edge computing servers, and robots will be deployed in outdoor or harsh industrial environments. Ubuntu Core on DFI certified hardware and Remoguard brings the reassurance that no software update will bring risks and challenges of on-site repair.

  • Update CentOS Linux for free

    As you may know, in December 2020 IBM/Red Hat announced that CentOS Linux 8 will end in December 2021. Additionally, the updates for CentOS Linux 6 ended on November 30, 2020. If your organization relies on CentOS, you are faced with finding an alternative OS. The lack of regular updates puts these systems at increasing risk for major vulnerabilities with every passing day. A popular solution with minimal disruption is to simply point your CentOS systems to receive updates from Oracle Linux. This can be done anonymously and at no charge to your organization. With Oracle Linux, you can continue to benefit from a similar, stable CentOS alternative. Oracle Linux updates and errata are freely available and can be applied to CentOS or Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) instances without reinstalling the operating system. Just connect to the Oracle Linux yum server, and follow these instructions. Best of all, your apps continue to run as usual.

  • Malware in open-source web extensions

    Since the original creator has exclusive control over the account for the distribution channel (which is typically the user's only gateway to the program), it logically follows that they are responsible for transferring control to future maintainers, despite the fact that they may only have the copyright on a portion of the software. Additionally, as the distribution-channel account is the property of the project owner, they can sell that account and the accompanying maintainership. After all, while the code of the extension might be owned by its larger community, the distributing account certainly isn't. Such is what occurred for The Great Suspender, which was a Chrome extension on the Web Store that suspends inactive tabs, halting their scripts and releasing most of the resources from memory. In June 2020, Dean Oemcke, the creator and longtime maintainer, decided to move on from the project. He transferred the GitHub repository and the Web Store rights, announcing the change in a GitHub issue that said nothing about the identity of the new maintainer. The announcement even made a concerning mention of a purchase, which raises the question of who would pay money for a free extension, and why. Of course, as the vast majority of the users of The Great Suspender were not interested in its open-source nature, few of them noticed until October, when the new maintainer made a perfectly ordinary release on the Chrome Web Store. Well, perfectly ordinary except for the minor details that the release did not match the contents of the Git repository, was not tagged on GitHub, and lacked a changelog.