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March 2015

Tiny, stackable, Linux-based IoT module hits Kickstarter

Filed under
Linux

On Kickstarter, Onion launched a tiny, Linux-based “Omega” IoT module, along with a dock, stackable expansion modules, a cloud service, and web app tools.

Onion’s Omega joins a growing number of single board computers and computer-on-modules for Internet of Things applications that have tapped Qualcomm’s MIPS-based, WiFi-enabled Atheros AR9331 system-on-chip. For a pledge of $25, Onion’s Kickstarter campaign offers the Omega computer-on-module combined with a “dock” that turns it into an sandwich-style single board computer.

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Development activity in LibreOffice and OpenOffice

Filed under
LibO
OOo

The LibreOffice project was announced with great fanfare in September 2010. Nearly one year later, the OpenOffice.org project (from which LibreOffice was forked) was cut loose from Oracle and found a new home as an Apache project. It is fair to say that the rivalry between the two projects in the time since then has been strong. Predictions that one project or the other would fail have not been borne out, but that does not mean that the two projects are equally successful. A look at the two projects' development communities reveals some interesting differences.

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11 Ways That Linux Contributes to Tech Innovation

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Over the past six months I've asked new Linux Foundation corporate members on the cutting edge of technology to weigh in on what interesting or innovative trends they're witnessing and the role that Linux plays in them. Here's what engineers, CTOs, and other business leaders from companies including CoreOS, Rackspace, SanDisk, and more had to say.

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Jessie Release Date: 2015-04-25

Filed under
Debian

We now have a target release date of Saturday the 25th of April. We
have checked with core teams, and this seems to be acceptable for
everyone. This means we are able to begin the final preparations for
a release of Debian 8 - "Jessie".

The intention is only to lift the date if something really critical
pops up that is not possible to handle as an errata, or if we end up
technically unable to release that weekend.

Please keep in mind that we intend to have a quiet period from
Saturday the 18th of April. Bug fixes must be *in Jessie* before
then.

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Radeon Linux Benchmarks: Catalyst 15.3 Beta vs. Linux 4.0 + Mesa 10.6-devel

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Before ending out March, here's some new OpenGL Linux benchmarks comparing the closed-source Catalyst 15.3 Beta driver against the Linux 4.0 development kernel with Mesa 10.6 Git for the freshest open-source graphics driver code.

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5 questions to determine if open source is a good fit for a software project

Filed under
OSS

A benefit of open source in general, and commercial open source in particular, is that you have the support of others as well as the ability to do the maintenance yourself.

I hope these questions will help you determine whether open source is a good fit for your next software project. Let me know if there are other questions you would add to this list.

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Clonezilla Live 2.4.0-7 Released to Fix a Btrfs Issue, Based on Debian Sid

Filed under
Development

Steven Shiau has released a new development version of his Clonezilla Live operating system aimed at system administrators who want an easy-to-use, portable, and straightforward solution for cloning disk drives.

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Lumina Desktop 0.8.3 Released!

Filed under
BSD

The next version of the Lumina Desktop Environment has just been released!

This is mainly a bugfix release to correct an urgent issue with the system tray on FreeBSD 11, but there are a number of other slight improvements/updates included as well. The full list of changes is included at the bottom of this announcement, but the notable changes are as follows:

New Panel Plugin: “Application Launcher“
This allows the user to pin the shortcut for an application directly to a panel.
New Utility: “lumina-xconfig“
This utility allows the user to easily enable/disable additional monitors/screens within the desktop session.
Fix the issue with transparent system tray icons on FreeBSD 11
Add support for the XDG autostart specifications.

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Netflix has more than 50 open source projects

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

My team has become very fond of an open source tool called Browserify. It was originally designed to allow the Node.js modules to be used in the browser, but we’ve leveraged it as the primary component in our build process. Over the last year, it has helped us to turn our monolithic code into a set of independent, maintainable modules. Previously, we were concatenating a big file and maintaining subsystem independence using namespaces, so this has been a big change for us.

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Cinnamon 2.4.7 Arrives with Numerous Fixes, Should Be in Repos Soon

Filed under
Linux

Cinnamon is a desktop environment built by the Linux Mint team and it's implemented by default in the Mint OSes. The current update, 2.4.7 is just a maintenance one, but it's pretty extensive and it comes with a ton of changes.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

ARM and AMD: GNU/Linux on Board

  • ARM Again in 2019 or 2020

    The assertion that nobody cares about SBSA is rather interesting. Obviously, nobody in the embedded area does. They just fork Linux, clone a bootloader, flash it and ship, and then your refrigerator sends spam and your TV is used to attack your printer, while they move on the next IoT product. But I do care. I want to download Fedora and run it, like I can on x86. Is that too much to ask?

  • EEPD Launches AMD Ryzen Embedded NUC Boards & Mini PCs

Programming: Rust, Haskell, Qt and Python

  • Sonja Heinze: What this blog is about

    In order to ask for an Outreachy grant for a certain open-source project, applicants first have to contribute to that project for about a month. When choosing a project, I didn’t know any Rust. But the fact that Fractal is written in Rust was an important point in favor due to curiosity. But I also expected to have a hard time at the beginning. Fortunately, that wasn’t really the case. For those who haven’t used Rust, let me give two of the reasons why: If you just start coding, the compiler takes you by the hand giving you advice like “You have done X. You can’t do that because of Y. Did you maybe mean to do Z?”. I took those pieces of advice as an opportunity to dig into the rules I had violated. That’s definitely a possible way to get a first grip on Rust. Nevertheless, there are pretty good sources to learn the basics, for example, the Rust Book. Well, to be precise, there’s at least one (sorry, I’m a mathematician, can’t help it, I’ve only started reading that one so far). It’s not short, but it’s very fast to read and easy to understand. In my opinion, the only exception being the topics on lifetimes. But lifetimes can still be understood by other means.

  • Joey Hess: announcing the filepath-bytestring haskell library

    filepath-bytestring is a drop-in replacement for the standard haskell filepath library, that operates on RawFilePath rather than FilePath.

  • Parsing XML with Qt: Updates for Qt 6

    This module provides implementations for two different models for reading and writing XML files: Document Object Model (DOM) and Simple API for XML (SAX). With DOM model the full XML file is loaded in memory and represented as a tree, this allows easy access and manipulation of its nodes. DOM is typically used in applications where you don't care that much about memory. SAX, on the other hand, is an event based XML parser and doesn't load the whole XML document into memory. Instead it generates events for tokens while parsing, and it's up to the user to handle those events. The application has to implement the handler interfaces (fully, or partially by using QXmlDefaultHandler). A lot of people find this inconvenient as it forces them to structure their code around this model. Another problem is that the current implementation of SAX (and as a consequence DOM, since it's implemented using SAX) is not fully compliant with the XML standard. Considering these downsides, Qt does not recommend using SAX anymore, and the decision has been made to deprecate those classes starting from Qt 5.15.

  • pathlib and paths with arbitrary bytes

    The pathlib module was added to the standard library in Python 3.4, and is one of the many nice improvements that Python 3 has gained over the past decade. In three weeks, Python 3.5 will be the oldest version of Python that still receive security patches. This means that the presence of pathlib can soon be taken for granted on all Python installations, and the quest towards replacing os.path can begin for real. In this post I’ll have a look at how pathlib can be used to handle file names with arbitrary bytes, as this is valid on most file systems.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #398 (Dec. 10, 2019)
  • Variables in Python

    If you want to write code that is more complex, then your program will need data that can change as program execution proceeds.

  • Creating an email service for my son’s childhood memories with Python

    This was very flexible as it allowed me to keep anything else I wanted in this document – and it was portable (to anyone who have access to some way of reading Word documents) – and accessible to non-technical people such as my son’s grandparents. After a while though, I wondered if I’d made the right decision: shouldn’t I have put it into some other format that could be accessed programmatically? After all, if I kept doing this for his entire childhood then I’d have a lot of interesting data in there… Well, it turns out that a Word table isn’t too awful a format to store this sort of data in – and you can access it fairly easily from Python. Once I realised this, I worked out what I wanted to create: a service that would email me every morning listing the things I’d put as diary entries for that day in previous years. I was modelling this very much on the Timehop app that does a similar thing with photographs, tweets and so on, so I called it julian_timehop.

  • Executing Shell Commands with Python

    Repetitive tasks are ripe for automation. It is common for developers and system administrators to automate routine tasks like health checks and file backups with shell scripts. However, as those tasks become more complex, shell scripts may become harder to maintain. Fortunately, we can use Python instead of shell scripts for automation. Python provides methods to run shell commands, giving us the same functionality of those shells scripts. Learning how to run shell commands in Python opens the door for us to automate computer tasks in a structured and scalable way. In this article, we will look at the various ways to execute shell commands in Python, and the ideal situation to use each method.

Red Hat Leftovers

  • Red Hat Global Customer Tech Outlook 2020: Hybrid cloud leads strategy, AI/ML leaps to the forefront

    For the sixth year running, we have reached out to our customers to hear where they are in their technology journey, and where they wish to go in the next year. For the 2020-focused survey, we received more than 870 qualified responses1 from Red Hat customers from around the world. They've weighed in about their challenges, strategies, and technologies they are planning to pursue in the next year and we're eager to share the results with you in our report.

  • NooBaa Operator for data management, now on OperatorHub.io

    We are excited to announce a new Operator—the NooBaa Operator for data management. The NooBaa Operator is an upstream effort that Red Hat is leading and is included as part of the features of the upcoming Red Hat OpenShift Container Storage 4, currently released for Early Access. Operators are design patterns that augment and implement common day one and day two activities with Kubernetes clusters, simplifying application deployments and empowering developers to focus on creation versus remediation.

  • Cloud native and Knative at W-JAX 2019

    The W-JAX conference in November 2019 in Munich, Germany, is a popular conference for Java, architecture, and software innovation with highly renowned speakers and sessions. Hot topics at this year’s conference included cloud-native development and open source technologies. Knative is one of the hottest topics, particularly here in Germany, it even has prime position on this month’s Java Magazin front cover. It was a pleasure to welcome Jason McGee, IBM Fellow, VP and CTO of the IBM Cloud Platform, whose keynote “The 20 Year Platform – bringing together Kubernetes, 12-Factor and Functions” revealed the next twenty years of application development. Jason showed the open source technologies that define how developers can rapidly build and operate high scale applications, discussing the key role Kubernetes plays in cloud platforms. However, in the future, Kubernetes will not be enough. Jason stressed the importance of up-and-coming tools such as Knative, Kabanero, Tekton and Razee, for the cloud-native landscape of the future.