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July 2017

Fedora 24 End of Life

Filed under
Red Hat

With the recent release of Fedora 26, Fedora 24 officially enters End Of Life (EOL) status on August 8th, 2017. After August 8th, all packages in the Fedora 24 repositories no longer receive security, bugfix, or enhancement updates. Furthermore, no new packages will be added to the Fedora 24 collection.

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Qubes OS 4.0-rc1 has been released!

Filed under
OS

No doubt this release marks a major milestone in Qubes OS development. The single most import undertaking which sets this release apart, is the complete rewrite of the Qubes Core Stack. We have a separate set of posts detailing the changes (Why/What/How), and the first post is planned to be released in the coming 2 weeks.

This new Core Stack allows to easily extend the Qubes Architecture in new directions, allowing us to finally build (in a clean way) lots of things we’ve wanted for years, but which would have been too complex to build on the “old” Qubes infrastructure. The new Qubes Admin API, which we introduced in a recent post, is a prime example of one such feature. (Technically speaking, we’ve neatly put the Admin API at the heart of the new Qubes Core Stack so that it really is part of the Core Stack, not merely an “application” built on top of it.)

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OPNsense 17.7 released

Filed under
BSD

For more than two and a half years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

We are writing to you today to announce the final release of version 17.7 “Free Fox”, which, over the course of the last 6 months, includes highlights such as SafeStack application hardening, the Realtek re(4) driver for better network stability, a Quagga plugin with broad routing protocol support and the Unbound resolver as the new default. Additionally, translations for Czech, Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese and German have been completed for the first time during this development cycle.

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Hands-on: A walk through the openSUSE Leap 42.3 installer

Filed under
SUSE

I wrote about the latest openSUSE Leap release a few days ago. In that post, I included some details about upgrading an existing openSUSE Leap installation to the new release. Since then, I have performed a fresh installation on another of my systems (the Acer Aspire V), so in this post I am going to include screenshots and a brief description of the installation process.

First, let's repeat some of the basic information about this release. The release announcement on the openSUSE website gives a bit of information (and a lot of propaganda) about the new release.The release notes contain a lot more technical detail, so be sure to read them before starting.

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Red Hat (RHT) Acquires Permabit Assets

Filed under
Red Hat

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that it has acquired the assets and technology of Permabit Technology Corporation, a provider of software for data deduplication, compression and thin provisioning. With the addition of Permabit’s data deduplication and compression capabilities to the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat will be able to better enable enterprise digital transformation through more efficient storage options.

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Leftovers: Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review; upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre

Filed under
Misc
  • Alpha Store litebook laptop Linux review

    I ordered a litebook after emailing back and forth questions about Linux and the product. They replied super fast and everything sounded great.

    In reality, if I had to guess what is happening, it's a couple teenagers working out of their moms basement, ordering laptops from aliexpress in bulk, installing Linux and then selling them for a profit.

  • Coming Soon | For The Record

    Are we too dependent our Internet connectivity? Should we instead, explore creating our own Linux media servers in place of common streaming services? I’ll give you a preview of my effort to reduce my reliance with common streaming services. I’ll talk about upcoming videos featuring Plex, Kodi, Ubooquity, Subsonic, calibre and more!

Linux 4.13 RC3 Released, Torvalds Curses

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 4.13-rc3

    Another week, another rc.

    Usually rc2 is the really quiet one, but this release cycle rc2 was
    fairly busy and it made me worry a bit about whether there was
    something bad going on with 4.13.

    But no, it was just random timing, and people got started sending in
    fixes early, and this release cycle it's rc3 that is small. It's about
    half the size (in commits) of rc2 - usually things are the other way
    around. Maybe people are starting to go on vacation (August tends to
    be quiet in Europe in particular).

    I'm not complaining. Quiet weeks are nice.

                        Linus

  • Linux 4.13-rc3 Kernel Released: It's A Small One
  • Linus Torvalds pens vintage 'f*cking' rant at kernel dev's 'utter BS'

    Linux overlord Linus Torvalds has fired off an expletive-laden rant of the sort that only he seems to find acceptable.

    His post to the Linux Kernel mailing list takes aim at a chap named Kees Cook, who The Register believes to be a Google employee working on security for the company's Pixel phones.

    Cook appears to have earned Torvalds' ire with his post warning of a bug in the way the Linux kernel deals with memory leaks.

    Torvalds' response is stern, kicking off with “Kees, stop this idiocy already”, explaining that the bugs Cook discusses are false positives and then launching into “ it's a f*cking disgrace that you are in denial about the fact that it's the *checking* that is broken, not the code, and are making excuses for shit.”

New Features Of Mesa 17.2, Mesa 17.2 Reaches RC2

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • The New Features Of Mesa 17.2

    Mesa 17.2 will be officially released in one or two weeks, so here's a recap of all the improvements made to this open-source 3D Linux driver stack over the past quarter.

    Mesa 17.2 continues with complete OpenGL 4.5 support for Intel i965 and RadeonSI while offering partial OpenGL 4.6 support. Hopefully for Mesa 17.3 next quarter we will see OpenGL 4.6 compliance.

  • Mesa 17.2 RC2 Released

    The second release candidate of Mesa 17.2 is now available for testing.

    Emil Velikov has just released Mesa 17.2 RC2 as the latest weekly build of what should become the next quarterly Mesa 3D stable release in one or two weeks, pending how last minute bug squashing goes. With RC2, RadeonSI should be back to working with Steam and no longer crashing.

  • [Mesa-dev] [ANNOUNCE] mesa 17.2.0-rc2

    The second release candidate for Mesa 17.2.0 is now available.

Graphics: ATI/AMD, Radeon, Vega

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware

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today's howtos

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  • Python 3.8.5 : Linked List - part 001.
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    sphinxcontrib.datatemplates is an extension for Sphinx to render parts of reStructuredText pages from data files in formats like JSON, YAML, XML, and CSV.

  • Python : 10 Ways to Filter Pandas DataFrame

    In this article, we will cover various methods to filter pandas dataframe in Python. Data Filtering is one of the most frequent data manipulation operation. It is similar to WHERE clause in SQL or you must have used filter in MS Excel for selecting specific rows based on some conditions. In terms of speed, python has an efficient way to perform filtering and aggregation. It has an excellent package called pandas for data wrangling tasks. Pandas has been built on top of numpy package which was written in C language which is a low level language. Hence data manipulation using pandas package is fast and smart way to handle big sized datasets.

  • Top GUI Frameworks that is every Python Developer's Favorite

    Python is one of the most popular and widely known programming languages that is a favorite in the developer community. Its advanced libraries and file extensions enable developers to build state-of-the-art tools for real-world problems, or simply design a GUI (Graphic User Interface). GUI plays an essential role in the computer world as it makes human-machine interaction easier. Python offers a diverse range of options for GUI frameworks. Some of these frameworks are more preferred by the developers to build both .apk and .exe applications. Moreover, its GUI toolkits include TK, GTK, QT, and wxWidgets, which come with more features than other platform-specific kits. Though the Python wiki on GUI programming lists on 30 cross-platform frameworks, we have selected our top 4 picks. They are: Kivy: It an open-source Python library for the rapid development of applications that makes use of innovative user interfaces, such as multi-touch apps. This liberal MIT-licensed Kivy is based on OpenGL ES 2 and includes native multi-touch for each platform. It is an event-driven framework based around the main loop, making it very suitable for game development. It supports multiple platforms, namely, Windows, MacOSX, Linux, Android-iOS, and Raspberry Pi. Unlike QtCreator, Kivy doesn’t have a visual layout program, but it uses its own design language to help you associate UI layout with code objects.

C/C++ Programming

  • How to use Strcpy() in C language?

    In this article, we are going to learn about the strcpy() function in the C programming language. The strcpy() function is a very popular standard library function to perform the string copy operation in the C programming language. There are several standard header files in C programming language to perform standard operations. The “string.h” is one of such header files, which provides several standard library functions to perform string operations. The “strcpy()” function is one of the library functions provided by “string.h”.

  • How to Use C++ Vector

    An array is a series of same object types in consecutive memory locations. An array cannot increase ore reduce in length. A vector is like an array, but its length can be increased or reduced. A vector, therefore, has many more operations than an array. C++ has many libraries, all of which form the C++ Standard Library. One of these libraries is the container library. A container is a collection of objects, and certain operations can be performed on the collection. C++ containers can be grouped into two sets: sequence containers and associative containers. Sequence containers are vector, array (not the same array discussed previously), deque, forward_list, and list. These are different collections (array-like data structures), and each offers distinct trade-offs. Any programmer should know how to decide whether to use a vector, an array, a deque, a forward_list, or a list. When a programmer needs a structure that requires more operations than those associated with an ordinary array, the ordinary array should not be used. If the task involves frequent insertions and deletions in the middle of the sequence, then a list or forward_list should be used. If the task involves frequent insertions and deletions in the beginning or end of a sequence, then a deque should be used. A vector should be used when these kinds of operations are not required.

  • How to Use isalpha() in C Language

    There are several standard library header files in the C programming language used to perform various standard operations. The “ctype.h” is one such header file, and the “isalpha()” function is one of the library functions provided by “ctype.h.” The isalpha() library function is used to identify whether a character is an alphabet. In this article, you will learn about the isalpha() library function in C language.

  • NVIDIA C++ Standard Library Now Available Via GitHub

    Introduced last year as part of CUDA 10.2 was libcu++ as the CUDA C++ standard library, which works with not only NVIDIA CUDA enabled configurations but also CPUs. The libcu++ sources are now available via GitHub.

FreeBSD 12.2-BETA2 Now Available


The second BETA build of the 12.2-RELEASE release cycle is now
available.

Installation images are available for:

o 12.2-BETA2 amd64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 i386 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 powerpc GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 powerpc64 GENERIC64
o 12.2-BETA2 powerpcspe MPC85XXSPE
o 12.2-BETA2 sparc64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 armv6 RPI-B
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 BANANAPI
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 BEAGLEBONE
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 CUBIEBOARD2
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 CUBOX-HUMMINGBOARD
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 RPI2
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 WANDBOARD
o 12.2-BETA2 armv7 GENERICSD
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 GENERIC
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 RPI3
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 PINE64
o 12.2-BETA2 aarch64 PINE64-LTS

Note regarding arm SD card images: For convenience for those without
console access to the system, a freebsd user with a password of
freebsd is available by default for ssh(1) access.  Additionally,
the root user password is set to root.  It is strongly recommended
to change the password for both users after gaining access to the
system.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here:

    https://download.freebsd.org/ftp/releases/ISO-IMAGES/12.2/

The image checksums follow at the end of this e-mail.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR
system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing
system, use the "releng/12.2" branch.

A summary of changes since 12.1-BETA1 includes:

o A regression affecting the PowerPC architecture had been fixed.

o A race condition that could lead to a system crash when using jails
  with VIMAGE had been fixed.

o Several wireless driver updates, including an update to ath(4), as
  well as 802.11n support for run(4) and otus(4).

o Capsicum support had been added to rtsol(8) and rtsold(8).

o A fix to certctl(8) to prevent overwriting a file on rehash.

o TRIM support had been added to the bhyve(4) virtio-blk backend.

o Fixes to libcompiler_rt have been added.

o The ice(4) driver had been added, providing support for Intel 100Gb
  ethernet cards.

o Fixes to ixl(4) affecting the PowerPC64 architecture have been added.

o Support for the Novatel Wireless MiFi 8000 and 8800 have been added to
  the urndis(4) driver.

o Fixes to the ure(4) driver to prevent packet-in-packet attacks have
  been addressed.  [SA-20:27]

o Fixes to bhyve(4) to prevent privilege escalation via VMCS access have
  been addressed.  [SA-20:28, SA-20:29]

o A fix to the ftpd(8) daemon to prevent privilege escalation via
  ftpchroot(5) had been addressed.  [SA-20:30]

Please note, the release notes page is not yet complete, and will be
updated on an ongoing basis as the 12.2-RELEASE cycle progresses.
Read more Also: FreeBSD 12.2 BETA2 Brings TRIM For Bhyve's VirtIO-BLK, Intel ICE Added