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January 2018

Linux Foundation's CNCF

Filed under
Linux
OSS
  • CNCF to Host the Rook Project to Further Cloud-Native Storage Capabilities

    Today, the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) voted to accept Rook as the 15th hosted project alongside Kubernetes, Prometheus, OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, containerd, rkt, CNI, Envoy, Jaeger, Notary and TUF.

    Rook has been accepted as an inception-level project, under the CNCF Graduation Criteria v1.0. The CNCF provides every project an associated maturity level of either inception, incubating or graduated. At a minimum, an inception-level project is required to add value to cloud native computing and be aligned with the CNCF charter.

  • CNCF’s First Cloud-Native Storage Project Is Rook

    Rook helped support HBO’s Game of Thrones season 7 premiere. Now, the open source software-defined storage project is the Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s 15th hosted project and first in the storage category.

    Kubernetes container deployments typically use external storage systems. Rook, on the other hand, brings file, block, and object storage systems into the Kubernetes cluster. This allows the systems to run alongside other applications that use their data, and it makes the cloud-native cluster portable across public and private clouds.

  • Jorge Castro: Updating your CNCF Developer Affiliation

    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation uses gitdm to figue out who is contributing and from where. This is used to generate reports and so forth.

You Can Now Use VirtualBox to Test KDE Plasma Mobile

Filed under
KDE

If you’re keen to try KDE Plasma mobile first hand I’ve some good news for you: it just got super easy to download and test it.

Yup, KDE has announced that a new ISO image is now available to download. Using this image you can boot an alpha-quality version of Plasma Mobile in a virtual machine app like VirtualBox or KVM.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

Software: Linux Partition Managers and GNOME Photo

Filed under
Software
  • Top 5 Linux Partition Managers

    There are many programs out there that help users manage partitions on their drives. Some, like fdisk, are command-line tools. Others have a GUI (graphical user interface), like GParted. I shall demonstrate, today, five very good Linux partition managers, both graphical and text-only.​

  • GNOME Photos: an overview of thumbnailing

    From time to time, I find myself being asked about various details about how content is thumbnailed in GNOME Photos, and the reasons behind various implementation decisions. I can never remember all the details, and always have to dig through Git history and bug reports across multiple modules to come up with an answer. I am hoping that this brain dump will be more persistent than my memory, and more holistic than random comments here and there.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Mycroft Mark II: the open source Amazon Echo you’ve always wanted

    Smart speakers are all the range in tech these days and soon it will be the battle of the titans. But as those giants scuffle, the small men, the consumers, sometimes get trampled on. Especially their privacy. It’s no secrets that the likes of Amazon and Google want your data. They promise to do no evil, but you can never really tell. Consumers have opted to just accept the status quo in exchange for convenience. Now, however, they don’t have to compromise just to get an Amazon Echo or Google Home experience, with the Mycroft Mark II Open Voice Assistant speaker.

  • Find Out the Visa Requirements to Attend oSC18

    For people planning on attending the openSUSE Conference 2018 in Prague, Czech Republic, from May 25 – 27, there are certain requirements necessary to receive a visa for those who are not citizen of the European Union.

  • Let's talk about Hacking (EPFL, Lausanne, 20 February 2018)

    I've been very fortunate to have the support from several free software organizations to travel to events around the world and share what I do with other people. It's an important mission in a world where technology is having an increasing impact on our lives. With that in mind, I'm always looking for ways to improve my presentations and my presentation skills. As part of mentoring programs like GSoC and Outreachy, I'm also looking for ways to help newcomers in our industry to maximize their skills in communicating about the great work they do when they attend their first event.

  • A rule-based framework to create dynamic themes

    In December, I gave an introduction to the theming API in Firefox. While it allows you to do many things like animated themes, macOS-style overscroll or interactive theme editors, the API has some limitations. One issue with dynamic theming API compared to traditional CSS theming is that it requires familiarity with JavaScript and WebExtension APIs to make a basic dynamic theme.

  • WebRender newsletter #13

    Greetings! Time for issue #13 of your favorite newsletter, where you can follow the progress of WebRender and it’s integration in Gecko. We are still busy fixing correctness issues (as you can see by the number of times the word “fixed” appears in the lists below), modulo Glenn’s usual big perf optimization.

  • A look inside Facebook's open source program [Ed: openwashing of monstrous surveillance company that's proprietary and secretive]
  • Apollo astronaut keypad being rebooted as open source replica

    Compared to the computer interfaces of today, the display keyboard used by the Apollo astronauts aboard their spacecraft might look quaint — until you recall that it was central to flying to the first humans to the moon almost half a century ago.

Red Hat: Southeast Asia, Colin Garro's Departure and Financial News

Filed under
Red Hat

OPNsense 18.1

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • OPNsense 18.1 released

    For more than 3 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

    We humbly present to you the sum of another major iteration of the OPNsense firewall. Over the second half of 2017 well over 500 changes have made it into this release, nicknamed "Groovy Gecko". Most notably, the firewall NAT rules have been reworked to be more flexible and usable via plugins, which is going to pave the way for subsequent API works on the core firewall functionality. For more details please find the attached list of changes below.

  • OPNsense 18.1 BSD Firewall/Network OS Released

    After hitting the RC phase a few weeks ago, OPNsense 18.1 has been officially released as the latest version of this pfSense-forked network/router-oriented BSD operating system.

    OPNsense 18.1 is based on FreeBSD 11.1 while pulling in the HardenedBSD security changes. OPNsense 18.1 reworks its firewall NAT rules, PHP 7.1 and jQuery 3 are powering the web interface, there is now OpenVPN multi-remote support for clients, IPv6 shared forwarding support, improvements for intrusion detection alerts, a rewritten firewall live log, reverse DNS support for insight reporting, and a variety of new plugins.

Graphics: AMDKFD, Mesa, NVIDIA, RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • It's Going To Take More Time To Get Vega Compute Support With The Mainline Kernel

    This weekend I wrote how the AMDKFD discrete GPU support should be in place for the next kernel cycle, Linux 4.17. This is going to allow discrete Radeon GPUs to have ROCm working off the mainline kernel for OpenCL/compute support, but for 4.17 it's unlikely RX Vega GPUs will have compute working.

  • Mesa 18.0-RC3 Released With 50+ Changes

    Emil Velikov announced the release today of Mesa 18.0-RC3 with 50+ changes comprising of many Intel ANV and Radeon RADV Vulkan driver fixes.

    It was just last week that the Mesa 18.0 code was branched and first release candidate issued. If you're wondering how we're already up to RC3, the RC2 release was a "brown paper bag" release that happened almost immediately after RC1 after the version string for RC1 was accidentally messed up. So in reality, this is the second real release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0.

  • NVIDIA 390.25 Linux Driver Released With GTX 1060 5GB & Quadro P620 Support

    After rolling out the 390.12 beta Linux driver in early January as the first public driver in the 390 series, NVIDIA is ending January by the first 390 stable release: 390.25.

    The NVIDIA 390.25 Linux driver is shipping this Monday as the first stable driver with various fixes, new product support, and other minor improvements over 390.12.

    New product support includes the GeForce GTX 1060 5GB and Quadro P620 Pascal graphics cards now being officially supported.

  • RADV Reworking Pipeline Emitting To Improve CPU Usage

    While using Vulkan lowers the CPU utilization compared to OpenGL, in our testing of NVIDIA versus the open-source Radeon drivers we generally have found the red team's drivers to consume more CPU resources. Thus it's good to hear that RADV co-conspirator Bas Nieuwenhuizen is working on reworking how this Radeon Vulkan driver handles pipeline emitting.

  • R600 Gallium3D Now Effectively At OpenGL 4.4, A Nudge Away From GL 4.5

    As a follow-up to the article a few days ago about nearly complete OpenGL 4.4~4.5 support for R600g, this pre-GCN older Radeon Gallium3D driver has landed in Mesa 18.1-dev Git support for its final OpenGL 4.4 extension.

    ARB_query_buffer_object is now in place inside Mesa Git following the patches David Airlie published a few days ago on the mailing list. This was the last OpenGL 4.4 extension incomplete for R600g in hitting OpenGL 4.4.

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE: digiKam, Plasma Mobile, KDE Discover, Plasma Vault

Filed under
KDE
  • digiKam Recipes 18-01-25 Released

    After a somewhat prolonged hiatus (my move from Denmark to Germany and full-time job at SUSE Linux GmbH had something to do with this), a new revision of the digiKam Recipes book is ready for your reading pleasure.

    A new book cover is probably the most visible change, but it’s certainly not the only one. All the screenshots have been updated to reflect changes in the latest version of digiKam. Obsolete content has been pruned, and some of the existing material has been revised and updated.

  • Events: FOSDEM 2018

    There’s a KDE stand where you can see some of the latest KDE bits and pieces, including Plasma 5 running on low-power hardware. 2GB ought to be enough for everyone, right? We might have a phone available running the existing Plasma Mobile code, since hardware continues to be tricky to come by (Nexus5X is fine).

  • This week in Discover, part 3

    In addition, we fixed bugs, including a few corner-case issues for workflows where Flatpak apps are available alongside apps from your distro. Flatpak support is constantly improving!

  • Plasma Vault and CryFS upgrades

    CryFS is considered beta software by its developers.

    While that is completely fine, it is a bit of a problem for the LTS release of Plasma Vault.

    The most recent problem that I was made aware of is that CryFS breaks its filesystem layout in new releases. While this is not a problem when using cryfs from the command line, it is a problem for UIs that use it like Plasma Vault, SiriKali and others.

More in Tux Machines

Linux 5.4 Lands A Number Of Memory Management Fixes

While mid-way through the Linux 5.4 development cycle with RC4 due out on Sunday, a number of memory management fixes just hit the mainline kernel. Andrew Morton's pull request was merged on Friday night and he noted, "Rather a lot of fixes, almost all affecting mm/" Indeed there were memory management fixes in this pull ahead of 5.4-rc4. Changes include a zRAM race condition fix, avoiding access to uninitialized memory maps, allow dropping transparent huge-pages (THP) from the page cache, and other fixes in this area including the possibility of a kernel crash. Read more Also: Intel's Cloud Hypervisor 0.3 Adds Block Device Offloading, Paravirtualized IOMMU

Programming: eMMC Flash, Compilers and Python

  • Some Tesla EV’s Control Screens Went Dark as Excessive Logging killed the eMMC Flash

    Despite wear-leveling techniques, eMMC flash memories tend to wear out over time as they have limited write cycles.

  • AMD Zen 2 Improvements For LLVM Have Been Held Up For Months By Code Review

    Back in February for LLVM Clang 9.0 was the initial AMD Zen 2 "znver2" enablement, but like the GCC support at the time it was the very basics. With time GCC picked up Zen 2 scheduler improvements and other work while sadly in the case of LLVM the improvements are still pending. Back in August, AMD's Ganesh Gopalasubramanian sent out the znver2 scheduler model for LLVM for Zen 2 CPUs but a focus on the EPYC 7002 "Rome" processors. "There are few improvements with respect to execution units, latencies and throughput when compared with znver1. The tests that were present for znver1 for llvm-mca tool were replicated. The latencies, execution units, timeline and throughput information are updated for znver2."

  • Python Add Lists

    This tutorial covers the following topic – Python Add lists. It describes various ways to join/concatenate/add lists in Python. For example – simply appending elements of one list to the tail of the other in a for loop, or using +/* operators, list comprehension, extend(), and itertools.chain() methods. Most of these techniques use built-in constructs in Python. However, the one, itertools.chain() is a method defined in the itertools module. You must also see which of these ways is more suitable in your scenario. After going through this post, you can evaluate their performance in case of large lists.

  • StackOverflow Report: (cxcix) stackoverflow python report

today's howtos

  • How to install Chromium on Ubuntu using SNAP
  • 3D using Godot

    It is time for another installment of Godot (previous entries: introduction, 2D). This time, I have dived into the world of 3D. The goal is to recreate parts of an old time favorite: Kosmonaut. Something I remember playing a lot on my dad’s 286 with amazing EGA graphics. The state of the game when writing can be seen in the short screen capture below. This is more of a tech demo status than a full game at the moment, but I hope you will still find it interesting. You can also get the complete source code. [...] Once we have a world with a track (the grid map), we add a player to the scene (the yellow blob in the image above – I need to learn Blender to create a proper ship). The player scene contains the ship – and the camera. This means that the camera follows the player automatically – very convenient. The player script is responsible for this ship’s movements based on user input. Inputs can either be pressed for a long time, used for sideways movement, or just tapped (i.e. the release is ignored), used for jumping. Each of the inputs are mapped to a keyboard key (or other input device) in the Project Settings dialog, under the Input Map tab. This feels a bit awkward to me and makes me lose the feeling of flow – but I don’t know how to do it better.

  • How to install OpenOffice on Linux
  • How To Install Free SSL Certificate for Apache on CentOS 8
  • Install VirtualBox 6 on CentOS 8
  • How to Install Odoo 13 on Ubuntu 18.04
  • How to Install Anaconda on Debian 10
  • Install Shutter Screenshot Tool via PPA in Ubuntu 19.10

Xfce 4.16 development phase starting

In the 4.14 cycle we tried to do a 1:1 port of what used to be our Gtk2 desktop environment, avoiding visual changes. In the 4.16 cycle we plan to harmonize the appearance of certain elements that either became inconsistent through the port or already were inconsistent before (e.g. toolbars or inline toolbars). We will also play with client-side decorations where we feel it makes sense (for instance replacing the so-called XfceTitledDialog, that is used for all settings dialogs with a HeaderBar version). Before anyone gets too excited (both positively or negatively): It is not planned to redesign more complex applications (like Thunar) with Headerbars in 4.16. We will however try to keep the experience and looks consistent, which means gradually moving to client side decorations also with our applications (please note that client side decorations are not the same as HeaderBars!). Through this change e.g. “dark modes” in applications will look good (see the part about the Panel below). Now before there is a shitstorm about this change I would kindly ask everyone to give us time to figure out what exactly we want to change in this cycle. Also, switching to client-side decorations alone is not a big visual departure – feel free to also dig through the client-side decorations page if you want to read/see more on this. Read more