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March 2018

More Windows Server vs. Linux Benchmark Tests With Spectre/Meltdown Mitigations

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week I posted an article looking at the Relative Spectre/Meltdown Mitigation Costs On Windows vs. Linux. Today from a different system and using Windows Server 2016 rather than Windows 10 are some fresh benchmarks doing a similar comparison with different hardware and also looking at the Spectre and Meltdown mitigation performance impact again on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Clear Linux.

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Red Hat looks beyond Linux

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

The Red Hat Linux distribution is turning 25 years old this week. What started as one of the earliest Linux distributions is now the most successful open-source company, and its success was a catalyst for others to follow its model. Today’s open-source world is very different from those heady days in the mid-1990s when Linux looked to be challenging Microsoft’s dominance on the desktop, but Red Hat is still going strong.

To put all of this into perspective, I sat down with the company’s current CEO (and former Delta Air Lines COO) Jim Whitehurst to talk about the past, present and future of the company, and open-source software in general. Whitehurst took the Red Hat CEO position 10 years ago, so while he wasn’t there in the earliest days, he definitely witnessed the evolution of open source in the enterprise, which is now more widespread than every.

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Stable kernels 4.15.15, 4.14.32, 4.9.92 and 4.4.126

Filed under
Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • “Top Notch” Android Phones Are Utterly Stupid And I Feel Sorry For Them

    I’m not going to dive deep and rant about all the “courageous” paths taken by Apple that I didn’t like. I’m not going to discuss why Apple ditched the 3.5mm headphone jack or why it chose to push proprietary connectors and standards. However, since this article is all about notches and Android device manufacturers are hellbent on copying Apple, changes brought in iPhone X can’t be ignored.

  • Days of Future_Open
  • [Podcast] PodCTL #31 – Reviewing Kubernetes 1.10

    Like clockwork, a new release of Kubernetes comes out every quarter. And with the arrival of Spring comes Kubernetes 1.10. Stability, Security, Networking and Storage are front of center of the new release. This week we dig into the 1.10 release and highlight some of the features that we believe will have the biggest impact on customers being able to deploy more applications on Kubernetes (and ultimately OpenShift).

  • Qubes Version 4.0 Released, Purism Laptops Shipping Quickly, New Rust Version 1.25.0 and More

    Purism announces that its Librem laptop orders are now shipping within a week—in other words, on average, the company now can fulfill orders within five business days. See the Purism blog for more information on this milestone.

  • GDC 2018 Videos Now Available, Including Khronos/Vulkan Talks

    If you are looking for some deep technical content to watch this weekend, the video recordings from this month's Game Developers Conference 2018 (GDC 18) are now available.

  • The ways of the GNOME people

    Hidden away in the farthest corner of the planet, its slopes covered in mist and darkness and its peaks lost in the clouds, stands the formidable Mount GNOME. Perched atop the mountain is a castle as menacing as the mountain itself – its towering walls made of stones as cold as death, and the wind howling through the courtyard like a dozen witches screaming for blood.

    Living inside the imposing blackness are a group of feral savages, of whom very little is known to the world outside. The deathly walls of the castle bear testimony to their skull-crushing barbarism, and their vile customs have laid waste to the surrounding slopes and valleys. Mortally fearful of invoking their mad wrath, no human traveller has dared to come near the vicinity of their territory. Shrouded in anonymity, they draw their name from the impregnable mountain that they inhabit – they are the GNOME people.

  • Leak Hunting and Mutter Hacking

    Last week, when I upgraded to GNOME 3.28, I was sad to notice an extremely annoying bug in Mutter/GNOME Shell: every once in a while, a micro-stuttering happened. This was in additions to another bug that was disappointing me for quite a while: the tiling/maximize/unmaximize animations were not working on Wayland too.

  • openSUSE Elections Postponed

    The elections for the openSUSE Board have been postponed until April 15.

    The postponement will extend Phase 1 of the elections and give candidates more time to campaign and engage with the community. The voting phase (Phase 2) will start April 15.

OSS Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
  • Best Content Management System

    Unless you've been living under a rock, you most certainly have heard of WordPress, one of the most popular blogging platforms around that also happens to be 100% open source. WordPress powers 27% of the web from personal to corporate to even government sites (Whitehouse.gov for one).

    In a 2008 interview, Linux Journal's Katherine Druckman asked WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg, "You frequently have reiterated your commitment to open-source ideals and GPL licensing. How has this commitment factored into the development of your company, Automattic? How do you use open-source technology to achieve your goals?"

  • Chime in: Which features could Microsoft 'steal' from Linux?
  • Dumping your USB

     

    One of the many new features of OpenBSD 6.3 is the possibility to dump USB traffic to userland via bpf(4). This can be done with tcpdump(8) by specifying a USB bus as interface:

  • LG re-open sources WebOS, a look at the AI behind the Pixel 2's camera, and more news
  • 6 differences between agile and traditional planning

    Traditional and agile planning methods both focus on developing strategies to lead teams to succeed in today's competitive landscape; however, their approaches are quite distinct. If you're transitioning from traditional to agile planning, it's important to understand their substantially different mindsets and leadership styles.

  • Product Review: GitStorage

    By profession, I'm a software developer. Aside from a preferred editor, what matters most to a developer is the use of a Source Code Manager (SCM). So, when a new product comes along featuring my favorite SCM, Git, I had no choice but to spend some time using it.

  • FOSS Project Spotlight: CloudMapper, an AWS Visualization Tool

    When working with AWS, it's common to have a number of separate accounts run by different teams for different projects. Gaining an understanding of how those accounts are configured is best accomplished by visually displaying the resources of the account and how these resources can communicate. This complements a traditional asset inventory.

    Duo built CloudMapper to generate interactive network diagrams of AWS accounts and released it as open source on Github.

Carnegie Mellon University's 'Open-Source' 3-D Bioprinter

Filed under
Hardware
  • Could this $500 open-source printer be the RepRap of 3D bioprinters?

    Researchers from Adam Feinberg’s lab at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an open-source 3D bioprinter that can be built affordably using a modified desktop 3D printer. The large-volume extruder (LVE) component of the bioprinter can be 3D printed.

  • Carnegie Mellon University researchers publish designs for open-source 3D bioprinter

    Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an open-source, low-cost 3D bioprinter. They have published a paper in HardwareX with the complete instructions for the installation of a syringe-based large volume extruder (LVE) on a desktop FDM 3D printer.

    The LVE allows users to print artificial human tissues at a high resolution and scale. It is designed to print a range of materials, including biopolymers, hydrogels, pastes and epoxies.

    Adam Feinberg, one of the authors of the paper and a Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon, said “The LVE 3D bioprinter allows us to print much larger tissue scaffolds, at the scale of an entire human heart, with high quality.”

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos

KDE: QupZilla/Falkon and KDE Connect Development

Filed under
KDE
  • Yahoo hit QupZilla.

    As most you already know as an XFCE environment installation comes with QupZilla web browser.
    The QupZilla web browser is a lightweight multiplatform web browser written in Qt Framework and using its web rendering engine QtWebEngine.
    If you using Fedora 28 the you can get the Falkon web browser.
    The wikipedia tell us about Falkon browser "(formerly QupZilla[3]) is a free and open-source web browser, intended for general users. Falkon is licensed under GPLv3."
    The Falkon browser working well with Yahoo.

  • Building KDE Connect

    After I shared the link to the KDE Connect Development Telegram group almost 20 people joined within 24 hours. I certainly did not expect such a interest in KDE Connect. When I joined the project about a year ago the hardest part for me was setting up a proper development workflow, meaning configuring, building, installing and debugging the application and interacting with git and Phabricator. To ease your start in KDE Connect development I would like to give you the guide I wish I had back then.

    I will show you how to fetch the project, build, run and debug it using KDevelop. It’s an IDE by the KDE Community designed with KDE projects in mind. In theory you can use any IDE you like, if you figure out how to configure it properly.

  • KDE Connect – New stuff I

    In my first post about KDE Connect I told you about the album cover art on Android. Thanks to Matthijs it now also works when the cover art is a local file, for example when you are using VLC. It already worked when the cover art was a remote URL, for example with Spotify. The cover art is now also shown in the media control notification and added to the Android media session.

More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Lenovo Chromebook C330 2-in-1

    Today we are looking at the Lenovo Chromebook C330 (81HY0000US), it is a 2-1 device, a notebook but it can also be converted into a tablet. It comes with a fanless quad-core MediaTek MT8173C CPU, an 11.6 inch, 1366x768, IPS display, and touch screen. It has 4gb of RAM and 64GB eMMC SSD.

  • Foliate Ebook Reader Picks Up Mobi & Amazon Kindle Support

    The Foliate ebook reader app for Linux has added support for additional ebook formats, including those used by the Amazon Kindle. Now, I’m conscious that I’ve mentioned Foliate a lot recently. I generally don’t like to do that — anyone remember the omg! docky! days? — but some developers are so dang prolific, able to knock out notable update after notable update at a regular clip, that I have no choice! Foliate’s developer, John Factotum, is one such dev — nice work!

  • Install & Run Xampp on Ubuntu 19.04 using Terminal
  • How to scan your Docker installment with docker-bench-test
  • KDE Applications 19.08 branches created

    Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 19.08 release to them

  • OpenMandriva Lx 4.1 Aiming To PGO More Packages, Use IWD For WiFi Connections

    While OpenMandriva Lx 4.0 was just released last month, we are already looking forward to OpenMandriva 4.1 for a number of improvements and some new features. OpenMandriva's developer board provides an interesting look at what's ahead for OpenMandriva Lx 4.1. Already completed for this next milestone include migrating to LLVM Clang 9, and using LD.lld and BFD as the default linkers.

  • Installing Debian 10

    Debian 10 Buster was released recently. It is the newest version on Debian operating system. Debian 10 comes with Linux Kernel 4.19. It also comes with latest Linux graphical desktop environment such as GNOME 3.30, KDE Plasma 5.14, Cinnamon 3.8, LXDE 0.99.2, LxQt 0.14, MATE 1.20, Xfce 4.12 and many more. Debian 10 also comes with awesome new artworks. In this article, I am going to show you how to install Debian 10 Buster on your computer.

  • Workload Consolidation: The Entire IoT in One Box

    To deliver the benefits of workload consolidation while ensuring robust partitioning, congatec has developed a proof of concept based on a six-core Core i7-based COM Express module, a type 1 hypervisor from Real-Time Systems, and Ubuntu Linux.

  • 100,985,047 have been invited to the Evite data breach “party”

    Did you get an invitation to the latest data breach? Over the weekend it was disclosed that Evite, the online invitation platform that has sent more than a few birthday and pizza party invitations over the years, suffered a data breach that included over 100 million accounts.

  • The Gecko Hacker's Guide to Taskcluster

    I spent a good chunk of this year fiddling with taskcluster configurations in order to get various bits of continuous integration stood up for WebRender. Taskcluster configuration is very flexible and powerful, but can also be daunting at first. This guide is intended to give you a mental model of how it works, and how to add new jobs and modify existing ones. I'll try and cover things in detail where I believe the detail would be helpful, but in the interest of brevity I'll skip over things that should be mostly obvious by inspection or experimentation if you actually start digging around in the configurations. I also try and walk through examples and provide links to code as much as possible.

Events: Plasma Sprint, PyCon, SciPy and All Systems Go!

  • Plasma sprint, 2019 edition; personal updates

    In June, I had a great time at a series of KDE events held in the offices of Slimbook, makers of fantastic Neon-powered laptops, at the outskirts of Valencia, Spain. Following on from a two-day KDE e.V. board of directors meeting, the main event was the 2019 edition of the Plasma development sprint. The location proved to be quite ideal for everything. Slimbook graciously provided us with two lovely adjacent meeting rooms for Plasma and the co-located KDE Usability & Productivity sprint, allowing the groups to mix and seperate as our topics demanded - a well-conceived spatial analog for the tight relationship and overlap between the two. [...] In KDE e.V. news, briefly we stole one of the sprint rooms for a convenient gathering of most of our Financial Working Group, reviewing the implementation of the annual budget plan of the organization. We also had a chance to work with the Usability goal crew (have you heard about KDE goals yet?) on a plan for the use of their remaining budget -- it's going to be exciting. As a closing note, it was fantastic to see many new faces at this year's sprint. It's hard to believe for how many attendees it was their first KDE sprint ever, as it couldn't have been more comfortable to have them on board. It's great to see our team grow.

  • Real Python at PyCon US 2019
  • Quansight presence at SciPy'19

    Yesterday the SciPy'19 conference ended. It was a lot of fun, and very productive. You can really feel that there's a lot of energy in the community, and that it's growing and maturing. This post is just a quick update to summarize Quansight's presence and contributions, as well as some of the more interesting things I noticed.

  • ASG! 2019 CfP Re-Opened!

    Due to popular request we have re-opened the Call for Participation (CFP) for All Systems Go! 2019 for one day. It will close again TODAY, on 15 of July 2019, midnight Central European Summit Time! If you missed the deadline so far, we’d like to invite you to submit your proposals for consideration to the CFP submission site quickly! (And yes, this is the last extension, there's not going to be any more extensions.)

GNOME: GSOC, GNOME Foundation, GLib

  • Gaurav Agrawal: GSOC Progress by Mid July

    July Marked the beginning of II GSOC coding month. This month our goal is to make the diff bar model as accurate and intuitive as possible. One of the biggest thing which I learnt so far is how to contribute on upstream repositories on which our project depends. In our case this was with Libgit2, we discovered a bug in Libgit2 while doing our project, and Albfan made this a perfect example to show me how to contribute on upstream, how to raise bugs and how to do discussions for getting it solved.

  • Jean-François Fortin Tam: Available for hire, 2019 edition

    Sometime after the end of my second term on the GNOME Foundation, I was contacted by a mysterious computer vendor that ships a vanilla GNOME on their laptops, Purism.

  • Array copying and extending in GLib 2.61.2

    A slightly more in-depth post in the mini-series this time, about various new functions which Emmanuel Fleury has landed in GLib 2.61.2 (which is due to be released soon), based on some old but not-quite-finished patches from others.

Programming: Python, Vim, Go and More

  • How to integrate jenkins with webhook
  • Serving Gifs With Discord Bot - Reading Time: 12 Mins
  • Python Snippet 1: More Uses For Else
  • Python Celery Guide
  • Python String Find()
  • PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2

    It hasn’t been long since we published PyCharm 2019.2 Beta, and now we’re ready to share with you the second Beta build! The final release date is getting closer and closer, and while you wait, give PyCharm 2019.2 Beta #2 a go! Get the PyCharm 2019.2 Beta build from our website and try all the latest functionality.

  • Vimrc Tutorial

    In this article, we’re going to dive deep into the vimrc file of Vim. Once you’re inside the vimscript, it’s easy to mess things up. That’s why this rule of thumb will always be helpful in your journey with Vim. Don’t put any line in vimrc that you don’t understand.

  • CPU atomics and orderings explained

    Sometimes the question comes up about how CPU memory orderings work, and what they do. I hope this post explains it in a really accessible way.

  • You can't say Go without Google – specifically, our little logo, Chocolate Factory insists

    Back in 2009, Google chose to name its latest programming language Go, a decision that is still giving it a migraine It could have called it "Google Go" to avoid confusion with Frank McCabe's Go! programming language. Despite criticism, it didn't do so. After almost a year of online grumbling, Google software engineer Russ Cox, in 2010, closed GitHub Issue #9, dismissing the complaints as "unfortunate." And the headaches over the thing's name still won't go away (no pun intended.) Last week, Google rebuffed a request to remove its logo from the Go website, golang.org, a change supported by some developers who feel Google takes Go developers for granted.