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April 2018

Canonical Adds Multipass Cleanbuild Support to Its Snapcraft Snap Creator Tool

Filed under
Ubuntu

Snapcraft 2.42 comes less than two weeks after version 2.41, which improved the mechanism for overriding lifecycle steps, passthrough property, error reporting, and updated the dotnet, nodejs, and python plugins, to add even more enhancements to the utility that helps application developers to package their apps as Snaps.

In Snapcraft 2.42, there's a new feature called multipass cleanbuild support, which might come in handy to users of snapcraft cleanbuild with multipass installed. To try it out, you'll have to run the "$ SNAPCRAFT_BUILD_ENVIRONMENT=multipass snapcraft cleanbuild" command in the terminal emulator.

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MeX Linux OS Drops Linux Mint Base, It's Now Based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
OS
Ubuntu

If previous versions of the MeX Linux distribution were based on Linux Mint, starting with build 180426, the operating system is now only based on packages from the Ubuntu and Debian GNU/Linux software repositories. The latest release is derived from the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) operating system series.

"Mex Linux is no longer based on Linux Mint," said Arne Exton. "MeX Build 180426 is based only on Debian and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Long Term Support). I have replaced the original kernel with “my” special kernel 4.15.0-19-exton. All packages in MeX Linux have been upgraded to the latest version by 180426."

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Also: Voyager Linux 18.04 Released with Long Term Support, Based on Xubuntu 18.04 LTS

Radeon Software for Linux 18.10 Brings Vulkan 1.1, Ubuntu 16.04.4 / SLE 12 SP3 Support

System76 Releases Updated Pop!_OS Based Off Ubuntu 18.04

GNOME 3.28 in Fedora 28 and Flatpak's Latest

Filed under
Red Hat
GNOME
  • Changes to Files in GNOME 3.28

    Here are some changes in GNOME 3.28 users will see in the Fedora 28 release.

  • Flatpak Linux Application Sandboxing & Distribution Framework Learns New Tricks

    Flatpak, the Linux application sandboxing and distribution framework, has been updated recently to version 0.11.4, a maintenance update that introduces numerous important changes.

    With Flatpak 0.11.4, the development team updated the "flatpak build" command to allow it to always use multi-arch support, as well as to mount app extensions during the build process. In addition, the "flatpak build-init" command now supports adding of extension points earlier than build-finish by using the --extension argument, and build-finish now supports the --remove-extension argument.

    Updates were also made to the "flatpak uninstall" command, which can now pick the user or system automatically if they're not specified, the "flatpak run" command, which received several new options like --no-a11y-bus and --no-documents-portal. Also, users can now use "flatpak remove" (without quotes) as an alias for the "flatpak uninstall" command.

Programming: GNU/Linux Development and Custom Android ROMs

Filed under
Android
Development
GNU
Linux
  • Create a Linux desktop application with Ruby

    Recently, while experimenting with GTK and its Ruby bindings, I decided to write a tutorial introducing this functionality. In this post, we will create a simple ToDo application (something like what we created with Ruby on Rails) using the gtk3 gem (a.k.a. the GTK+ Ruby bindings).

  • C# developer, Linux two of the fastest-growing search terms for Canadian tech job seekers

    A new report from Indeed Canada shows the fastest-growing search terms for tech job seekers in Canada.

  • The pain of installing custom ROMs on Android phones

    A while back I bought a Nexus 5x. During a three-day ordeal I finally got Omnirom installed - with full disk encryption, root access and some stitched together fake Google Play code that allowed me to run Signal without actually letting Google into my computer.

    A short while later, Open Whisper Systems released a version of Signal that uses Web Sockets when Google Play services is not installed (and allows for installation via a web page without the need for the Google Play store). Dang. Should have waited.

    Now, post Meltdown/Spectre, I worked up the courage to go through this process again. In the comments of my Omnirom post, I received a few suggestions about not really needing root. Hm - why didn't I think of that? Who needs root anyway? Combining root with full disk encryption was the real pain point in my previous install, so perhaps I can make things much easier. Also, not needing any of the fake Google software would be a definite plus.

    This time around I decided to go with LineageOS since it seems to be the most mainstream of the custom ROMs. I found perfectly reasonable sounding instructions.

Linux Mint Monthly News

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Ubuntu
  • Monthly News – April 2018

    Before anything else, let’s thank all the people who contribute to this project. Many people do, in very different ways. Special thanks to our donors to our “silent friend” from Germany for the coffee!

    Many thanks also to all the developers who interacted with us on Github lately. We’ve seen a lot of new faces and very cool contributions. A slack team was recently set up to improve communication between new developers and the development team.

  • Linux Mint Continues Work On Mint 19, LMDE 3

    The Linux Mint project has published their monthly recap of activities going on for April with this popular desktop Linux distribution.

    To little surprise, much of their time has been spent on setting up their re-base against Ubuntu Bionic (Ubuntu 18.04) for Linux Mint 19 and Debian Stretch for the upcoming LMDE3 (Linux Mint Debian Edition). As part of these upcoming OS releases, they have also been buttoning up the Cinnamon 3.8 desktop environment update.

USB 3.2 Work Is On The Way For The Linux 4.18 Kernel

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

USB 3.2 was announced last summer as an incremental update to the USB standard to double the bandwidth for existing USB Type-C cables.

We haven't seen much in the way of USB 3.2 mentions in the Linux kernel yet but then again we haven't really seen USB 3.2 devices yet. USB 3.2 brings a multi-lane operation mode for hosts and devices using existing Type-C cables as well as a minor update to the USB hub specification. USB 3.2 allows for new 10 Gbit/s and 20 Gbit/s rates using two lanes, USB 3.2 Gen 1x2 and USB 3.2 Gen 2x2, respectively.

It's looking like kernel developers are now working on getting their USB 3.2 Linux support in order. We were tipped off that as of last week there are some USB 3.2 patches queued in the usb-next tree maintained by Greg Kroah-Hartman's.

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Also: Linux 4.16.6 Brings Correct AMD Ryzen 7 2700X Temperature Monitoring

Games: EARTHLOCK, FOX n FORESTS and More

Filed under
Gaming

Tired of Windows and macOS? Try out elementary OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux

It’s interesting to change your default OS to try out something new sometimes, but then if you already have Windows 10 on your machine, I don’t see a strong argument to install elementary OS. Some might prefer it, but I think I will go back to Windows for now and check back with other solutions in the future. Please consider this as my own humble opinion. I recommend you to try out new solutions and find your own favorites. So, can elementary OS replace the big players? It could, but I suppose it’s mainly depending on the tools you (want to) use in your workflows.

If you mostly leverage software that’s exclusively available on Windows or macOS, it doesn’t really work out to swap between the systems, but if you can manage to shift it all towards Linux, you might survive the transition without too much pain points. If you’re mostly working within Google Chrome, you can also just install Chrome for Linux on elementary OS and run your work like that. In this particular case, you’ll feel almost no change, but then, you might as well opt for Remix OS or another type of Chrome OS.

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Also: Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Now Available To Download With 5Yrs Of Support

More in Tux Machines

Five reasons Chromebooks are better than Windows laptops

Today, Windows users hold off for as long as possible before "updating" their PCs. Chrome OS users, on the other hand, have their systems updated every six weeks without a hitch. And, I might add, these updates take a minute or two instead of an hour or two. Chrome OS is also more secure than Windows. WIndows security violations pop up every blessed month. Sure, Chrome OS has had security holes, but I can't think of one that's been significantly exploited. Want a nightmare? Try migrating from an old Windows PC to a new one. Even if you're jumping from Windows 10 to Windows 10, there are no easy ways to do it. If you have a Microsoft account, rather than a local account, you must manually move your local files from third-party programs such as Photoshop On Chrome OS, you log in to your new Chromebook and -- ta-da! -- you're back in business. No fuss, no muss. Read more

Programming: Joget Operator, Python, LibreOffice, GNOME and KDE

  • Automating Low Code App Deployment on Red Hat OpenShift with the Joget Operator

    This is a guest post by Julian Khoo, VP Product Development and Co-Founder at Joget Inc. Julian has almost 20 years of experience in the IT industry, specifically in enterprise software development. He has been involved in the development of various products and platforms in application development, workflow management, content management, collaboration and e-commerce.

  • Python Histogram Plotting: NumPy, Matplotlib, Pandas & Seaborn

    In this course, you’ll be equipped to make production-quality, presentation-ready Python histogram plots with a range of choices and features. If you have introductory to intermediate knowledge in Python and statistics, then you can use this article as a one-stop shop for building and plotting histograms in Python using libraries from its scientific stack, including NumPy, Matplotlib, Pandas, and Seaborn.

  • PyCon 2020 Conference Site is here!

    Our bold design includes the Roberto Clemente Bridge, also known as the Sixth Street Bridge, which spans the Allegheny River in downtown Pittsburgh. The Pittsburgh Steelmark, was originally created for United States Steel Corporation to promote the attributes of steel: yellow lightens your work; orange brightens your leisure; and blue widens your world. The PPG Building, is a complex in downtown Pittsburgh, consisting of six buildings within three city blocks and five and a half acres. Named for its anchor tenant, PPG Industries, who initiated the project for its headquarters, the buildings are all of matching glass design consisting of 19,750 pieces of glass. Also included in the design are a fun snake, terminal window, and hardware related items. [...] As with any sponsorship, the benefits go both ways. Organizations have many options for sponsorship packages, and they all benefit from exposure to an ever growing audience of Python programmers, from those just getting started to 20 year veterans and every walk of life in between. If you're hiring, the Job Fair puts your organization within reach of a few thousand dedicated people who came to PyCon looking to sharpen their skills.

  • PyCoder’s Weekly: Issue #382 (Aug. 20, 2019)
  • Python Qt5 - the QTimer class.
  • [LibreOffice GSoC] Week 12 Report

    It was The last week of GSoC program. Raal was working on testing all the project and the generated files and I help him by solving some bugs or add anything.

  • Sajeer Ahamed: Review | GSoC 2019

    I've been working on GStreamer based project of Gnome Foundation. GStreamer is a pipeline-based multimedia framework that links together a wide variety of media processing systems to complete complex workflows. The framework is based on plugins that will provide various codec and other functionality. The plugins can be linked and arranged in a pipeline. And most of the plugins are written in C. Now the developers are in an attempt to convert them to Rust which is more robust and easily maintainable. My task is to be a part of this conversion and to help fix issues related to this.

  • KDE's Onboarding Sprint: Making it easier to setup a development environment

    Suse were generous enough to offer two spacious and fully equipped offices at their headquarters to host the KDE sprints. We owe a special thanks and a big KDE hug to the OpenSuse team and in particular Douglas DeMaio and Fabian Vogt for being incredible hosts.

  • Third month progress

    I am here presenting you with my final month GSoC project report. I will be providing the links to my work at the end of the section. Final month of the work period was much more hectic and tiring than the first couple of months. I had been busy more than I had anticipated. Nonetheless, I had to write code which I enjoyed writing : ) . In the first half of this work period, I was focused on completing the left-over QDBus communication from the phase 2, which I did successfully. But as when I thought my task was all over, I was faced with some regression in the code, which I utilised my rest half a month to fix it. [...] As I had said above in the intro, I was faced with some real difficulty during the second half of the work period. As soon as I finished up QDBus thing, a regression was caused (Which I should have noticed before, my bad), helper was no longer started by the main application. I spent rest of the days brain-storming the issue but due to shortage of time, could not fix it. I plan to try fixing it in the next few days before GSoC ends(26th August), if I successfully do that, I will update the status here as well .

Games: Steam Play/Proton, GNU/Linux on Xbox, and UnderMine

  • CodeWeavers Reflects On The Wild Year Since Valve Introduced Steam Play / Proton

    This week marks one year since Valve rolled out their Proton beta for Steam Play to allow Windows games to gracefully run on Linux via this Wine downstream catered for Steam Linux gaming. It's been crazy since then with all of Valve's continued work on open-source graphics drivers, adding the likes of FAudio and D9VK to Proton, continuing to fund DXVK development for faster Direct3D-over-Vulkan, and many other infrastructure improvements and more to allow more Windows games to run on Linux and to do so well and speedy.

  • Turn your Xbox console into a home PC with this guide

    If you’ve ever wondered if you can turn your Xbox into a PC, you came to the right place. Because the Xbox console has the same hardware specifications as some older computer desktops, you will be able to convert it to a fully functioning PC. Unfortunately, you will not be able to install Windows on your console, but you can use the Linux operating system. In this article you will find out what items you’re going to need in order to make this happen, and also the steps you need to follow to accomplish this.

  • Action-adventure roguelike UnderMine now available in Early Access

    UnderMine from developer Thorium is an action-adventure roguelike with a bit of RPG tossed in, it's now in Early Access with Linux support. [...] Featuring some gameplay elements found in the likes of The Binding of Isaac, you proceed further down the UnderMine, going room to room digging for treasure and taking down enemies. There's also some RPG style rogue-lite progression involved too, as you're able to find powerful items and upgrades as you explore to prepare you for further runs.

GNU Scientific Library 2.6 released

Version 2.6 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release introduces major performance improvements to common linear algebra matrix factorizations, as well as numerous new features and bug fixes. The full NEWS file entry is appended below. The file details for this release are: ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz ftp://ftp.gnu.org/gnu/gsl/gsl-2.6.tar.gz.sig The GSL project homepage is http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ GSL is free software distributed under the GNU General Public License. Thanks to everyone who reported bugs and contributed improvements. Patrick Alken Read more