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July 2018

Dell XPS 13 Kabylake Makes For A Great Linux Laptop

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When it comes to new laptops for the summer of 2018 that are Linux-friendly, the latest-generation Dell XPS 13 with Intel Kabylake-R processor ranks high on that list. Recent in upgrading my main production workstation, I decided to go with the Dell XPS 13 9370 while using Fedora Workstation 28 and it's been a phenomenal combination. Here are my thoughts on the current Dell XPS 13 as well as some benchmarks and other information.

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Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming

Here's the New Login Screen of Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) with Yaru Theme

Filed under
Ubuntu

One of the most attractive things about the forthcoming Ubuntu 18.10 operating system, due for release later this fall on October 18, 2018, is its new look and feel, which is provided by the so-called Communitheme that was recently renamed as Yaru, a system-wide theme for Ubuntu Desktop.

As part of this community initiative, Ubuntu 18.10 will get a brand-new look and feel that will make the popular computer operating system more modern, more accessible, and more attractive. And, today we finally have a first look at the Yaru theme on the current Ubuntu 18.10 (Cosmic Cuttlefish) development release.

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Red Hat's Latest Articles, OpenShift, and Finance

Filed under
Red Hat
  • How to be the lazy sysadmin

    The job of a Linux SysAdmin is always complex and often fraught with various pitfalls and obstacles. Ranging from never having enough time to do everything, to having the Pointy-Haired Boss (PHB) staring over your shoulder while you try to work on the task that she or he just gave you, to having the most critical server in your care crash at the most inopportune time, problems and challenges abound. I have found that becoming the Lazy Sysadmin can help.

  • What's in a container image: Meeting the legal challenges

    Container technology has, for many years, been transforming how workloads in data centers are managed and speeding the cycle of application development and deployment.

    In addition, container images are increasingly used as a distribution format, with container registries a mechanism for software distribution. Isn't this just like packages distributed using package management tools? Not quite. While container image distribution is similar to RPMs, DEBs, and other package management systems (for example, storing and distributing archives of files), the implications of container image distribution are more complicated. It is not the fault of container technology itself; rather, it's because container distribution is used differently than package management systems.

  • The top requirement for high-impact teams

    What is the top requirement for high-impact teams? When I was recently asked this question, I started making a list.

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: OpenShift Origin 3.10 Release Update with Derek Carr and Mike Barrett (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Derek Carr and Mike Barrett walk us thru what’s new in OpenShift Origin Release 3.10

  • OpenShift Commons Briefing: IoT Edge Deployments on OpenShift with RHEL – Luca Gabella (Red Hat)

    In this briefing, Red Hat’s Alessandro Arrichiello, Luca Bigotta and Luca Gabella (Red Hat) walk us thru leveraging containers  for IoT Edge Deployments: in this scenario and discuss how developers are using OpenShift  to build Edge Applications. Then they walked us thru  a real use case scenario how developers can leverage OpenShift features for enabling Hybrid deployments on standalone Red Hat Enterprise Linux. In the demonstration, they also show using OpenShift’s Ansible Service Broker for automating the external deployment, and talked about using Ansible Tower when large scale ones will be needed.

  • Red Hat Inc. (RHT) Dips 3.16% for July 30
  • Stock Under Review: Red Hat (NYSE: RHT)
  • Are Investors need vacation from Autodesk, Inc. (ADSK) and Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)?

Istio 1.0

Filed under
Server
  • IBM & Google Launch 'Istio' Cloud Software, but Amazon & Microsoft Skip the Party

    Istio, an open source project backed by IBM, Google, Red Hat and others for connecting, managing and securing Kubernetes containers, hits version 1.0 Tuesday. But can Istio become ubiquitous without support from market leaders Amazon Web Services and Microsoft?

    Istio, also backed by Lyft Inc. and Pivotal , is a "service mesh," picking up where Kubernetes leaves off. Kubernetes provides orchestration to run multiple containers, manage their lifecycle, keep them available and scale them up and down as needed. Istio is software for managing how containers interact with each other.

  • The Istio service mesh hits version 1.0
  • What is Istio? The latest open source project out of Google
  • Istio sets sail as Red Hat renovates OpenShift container ship

    Red Hat is celebrating the 1.0 release of Istio, the open source microservices management project, and the arrival of version 3.10 of its OpenShift software container platform.

    Istio's 1.0 release received mention at Google Cloud Next last week, but the official bits are expected on Tuesday. The software serves as a management mechanism for distributed microservices, providing capabilities like traffic management, service identity and security, policy enforcement and telemetry among apps running across multiple Kubernetes clusters and hosts.

  • IBM, Google, Red Hat push Istio to 1.0 release

    IBM launched Istio along with Google Cloud and Lyft a little more than a year ago. The goal of Istio is to give developers a vendor-neutral way to connect, secure and manage networks of various microservices.

    Managing microservices is a critical issue since enterprises are increasingly built on them. By breaking services and applications into smaller parts developers can be more agile. The issue is that managing various microservices requires a good bit of choreography.

Google’s Edge TPU AI chip will run on a USB stick computer

Filed under
Android
Linux

Google followed up on its Edge TPU machine learning chip announcement by unveiling a USB Type-C based version that you can plug into any Linux or Android Things computer, including a Raspberry Pi. There are also new details on the Edge TPU dev board.

Following Google’s announcement of an embedded friendly Edge TPU version of its Tensor Processing Unit AI chip and the related Cloud IoT Edge stack for IoT gateways, the company announced a USB stick computer version of Edge TPU that can work with any Linux or Android Things computer. It also posted more details on the upcoming, NXP-based Edge TPU development kit, including its SoC: an NXP i.MX8M.

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UK's National Cyber Security Centre Give Advice on Securing Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

Filed under
Security
Ubuntu

Dubbed Bionic Beaver, the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system was launched in April 2018 as the latest release of Canonical's popular Ubuntu Linux OS, and it's a long-term support release that will receive security and software updates for the next five years, until April 2023. The Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS point release is also available for download and includes all the latest security updates.

Being based on the Linux kernel, Ubuntu is already a secure computer operating system compared to Windows or macOS, but if you're living in the UK (United Kingdom) and you need to configure your Ubuntu 18.04 LTS installations for maximum security, the National Cyber Security Centre tells you how.

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KDE Plasma 5.13.4 Desktop Environment Released with More Than 45 Improvements

Filed under
KDE

Coming almost three weeks after the KDE Plasma 5.13.3 release, the KDE Plasma 5.13.4 maintenance update continues to improve the stability and performance of the KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment by adding total of 48 changes and bug fixes across various components, including the Plasma Desktop, Plasma Discover, Plasma Workstation, KScreen, KWin, Plasma Add-ons, Info Center, Breeze Plymouth, and others.

"Today KDE releases a Bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.13.4. Plasma 5.13 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds two week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement.

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Story of GNOME Shell Extensions

Filed under
GNOME

A long time ago (exactly 10 years ago) it was decided that the the shell for GNOME would be written in JavaScript. GNOME 3 was still looking for its new face, a lot of UI experimentation was taking place, and JavaScript looked like the best candidate for it. Moreover it was a popular language on the web, so barriers to entry for new contributors would be significantly lowered.

When you have the shell written in JavaScript you can very easily patch it and alter its look and behaviour. And that’s what people started doing. Upstream was not very keen to officially support extensions due to their nature: they’re just hot patching the GNOME Shell code. They have virtually unlimited possibilities in changing look and behaviour, but also in introducing instability.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Meetup Will Discuss Survey Results, Project Improvements

    The openSUSE Project welcomes our followers to participate in two planned meetups to discuss results from the End of the Year Community Survey on Jan. 23 and Jan. 30. Both sessions will start at 13:00 UTC on openSUSE’s Jitsi instance and go for 1:30 hours. Members of the “let’s improve the openSUSE learning experience” initiative will share results and analysis from the survey.

  • LF‌ ‌Edge‌ ‌Adds‌ ‌New‌ ‌Members‌

    LF Edge has announced the addition of four new general members (FII, HCL, OpenNebula, and Robin.io) and one new Associate member (Shanghai Open Source Information Technology Association). Additionally, Home Edge has released its third platform update with new Data Storage and Mult-NAT Edge Device Communications (MNDEC) features.

  • Text Encoding Menu in 2021

    In mid-January 2021, the Text Encoding menu in Firefox looks like this: Automatic Unicode Western Arabic (Windows) Arabic (ISO) Baltic (Windows) Baltic (ISO) Central European (Windows) Central European (ISO) Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Cyrillic (Windows) Cyrillic (KOI8-U) Cyrillic (KOI8-R) Cyrillic (ISO) Cyrillic (DOS) Greek (Windows) Greek (ISO) Hebrew, Visual Hebrew Japanese Korean Thai Turkish Vietnamese [...] For users who have telemetry enabled, we collect data about whether the item “Automatic” was used at least once in given Firefox subsession, whether an item other than “Automatic” was used at least once in a given Firefox subsession, and a characterization of how the encoding that is being overridden was determined (from HTTP, from meta, from chardetng running without the user triggering it, from chardetng as triggered by the user by having chosen “Automatic” previously, etc.). If things go well, the telemetry can be analyzed when Firefox 87 is released (i.e. when 86 has spent its time on the release channel). The current expectation for this is 2021-03-23.

  • Wikipedia is twenty. It’s time to start covering it better. - Columbia Journalism Review
  • Jimmy Wales: “Wikipedia is from a different era”

    As the online encyclopedia turns 20-years-old, its founder reflects on the internet’s halcyon days.

  • Fact check: As Wikipedia turns 20, how credible is it?

    Wikipedia, which has been referred to as a world treasure, turns 20 on Friday. According to research conducted over the years — including a scientific study published by the journal Nature in 2005 and a report commissioned by the site's Wikimedia Foundation in 2012 — Wikipedia's entries are comparable in quality to those in prestigious encyclopedias such as Britannica. However, it is difficult to measure the consistency of information that can be altered at any time.

  • Odin is finally pleased so the open-world survival game Valheim releases on February 2 | GamingOnLinux

    Odin has finally had enough sacrifices and shall be releasing Valheim from Iron Gate AB will enter Early Access with Linux and Windows support on February 2. What is it? A brutal multiplayer exploration and survival game set in a procedurally-generated purgatory inspired by viking culture. Battle, build, and conquer your way to a saga worthy of Odin’s patronage! With low-poly artwork and a very flexible building system it looks absolutely brilliant. The early builds they had available were seriously promising back in 2018 so I'm personally excited to see how far they've progress with it in that time.

Programming Leftovers

  • Ravgeet Dhillon: Offline Toast notification in Nuxt/Vue app

    We have often seen apps telling us that “You are offline. Check your network status.”. It is not only convenient to do so but adds to a great UX. In this blog, we will look at how can we display a toast notification in a Nuxt/Vue app whenever the user goes offline or online. This will also help us to understand how to use computed and watch properties together. [...] Hurray! Our toast notifications are working perfectly fine. So using the combined magic of computed and watch properties, we can create outstanding workflows and take our Nuxt/Vue app to next level. If you any doubts or appreciation for our team, let us know in the comments below. We would be happy to assist you.

  • Stephen Michael Kellat: Leveraging LaTeX In This Time

    From time to time I like to bring up fun adventures in LaTeX. In these stranges times in the United States it is important to look at somewhat practical applications beyond the normal reports and formal papers most people think of. With a Minimum Working Example we can mostly look at an idea. The Comprehensive TeX Archive Network has a package known as newspaper which is effectively subject to nominative determinism. You can make things with it that look like newspapers out of the 1940s-1960s in terms of layout. The page on CTAN shows nice examples of its use and provides a nice story as to why the package was created. The example source file on CTAN has a bug in it, though. We're going to make a new one based on it. I am also going to add but not yet utilize the markdown package to the example.

  • 2021.03 Course Topped – Rakudo Weekly News

    The course of the Raku Programming Language by Andrew Shitov made it to the top 20 of Hacker News and spurred quite a few comments. The first associated Grant Report was also published.

  • GCC 11 Is On The Final Stage Of Development With 60+ High Priority Regressions - Phoronix

    GCC 11 entered its final stage of development today as it works towards releasing around the end of Q1 / early Q2 if their past cadence holds up. Before GCC 11.1 can debut as the first stable version, there are some 60+ "P1" high priority regressions that need to be resolved or otherwise demoted to lesser priority regressions. GCC 11 release manager Richard Biener this morning announced GCC 11 is now in stage four development meaning only regression fixes and documentation fixes are allowed. As of this morning the code-base is at 62 P1 regressions, another 334 P2 regressions, 35 P3 regressions, and more than 200 regressions of the lower P4/P5 status.

Devices: Xtra-PC, Arduino and Inventor Coding Kit

  • Xtra-PC Reviews – Best Linux USB-Stick? - Product Review by Rick Finn

    The Xtra-PC Linux USB-Stick might be your solution if you have problems with your old and slow PC. It's a small flash drive stick and it's using Linux OS to boost you PC's operations. Check out now.

  • Arduino Blog » Old keyboard turned into a new children’s learning toy

    Peter Turczak’s toddler son loves “technical stuff,” especially things like keyboards and computers that adults use. After discussing this with other likeminded technical parents, the idea of giving new life to an old (PS/2 or AT) keyboard as a teaching tool was hatched.

  • SiFive Helping To Teach Kids Programming With RISC-V HiFive Inventor Coding Kit

    SiFive in cooperation with Tynker and BBC Learning have launched a Doctor Who themed HiFive Inventor Coding Kit. This Initial HiFive Inventor Coding Kit is intended to help kids as young as seven years of age get involved with computer programming through a variety of fun exercises and challenges involving the RISC-V powered mini computer and related peripherals like LED lighting and speaker control. [...] So for those looking to get their kids involved with computer programming and looking for an IoT-type device with some fun sensors and various themed exercises to get them experimenting, the HiFive Inventor Coding Kit is worth looking into further. More details on the programming platform can be found via Tynker.com and on the hardware at HiFiveInventor.com. The HiFive Inventor Kit is available from Amazon.com and other Internet retailers for $75 USD.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (atftp, coturn, gitlab, mdbook, mediawiki, nodejs, nodejs-lts-dubnium, nodejs-lts-erbium, nodejs-lts-fermium, nvidia-utils, opensmtpd, php, python-cairosvg, python-pillow, thunderbird, vivaldi, and wavpack), CentOS (firefox and thunderbird), Debian (chromium and snapd), Fedora (chromium, flatpak, glibc, kernel, kernel-headers, nodejs, php, and python-cairosvg), Mageia (bind, caribou, chromium-browser-stable, dom4j, edk2, opensc, p11-kit, policycoreutils, python-lxml, resteasy, sudo, synergy, and unzip), openSUSE (ceph, crmsh, dovecot23, hawk2, kernel, nodejs10, open-iscsi, openldap2, php7, python-jupyter_notebook, slurm_18_08, tcmu-runner, thunderbird, tomcat, viewvc, and vlc), Oracle (dotnet3.1 and thunderbird), Red Hat (postgresql:10, postgresql:12, postgresql:9.6, and xstream), SUSE (ImageMagick, openldap2, slurm, and tcmu-runner), and Ubuntu (icoutils).

  • About CVE-2020-27348

    Well this is a doozey. Made public a while back was a security vulnerability in many Snap Packages and the Snapcraft tool used to create them. Specifically, this is the vulnerability identified as CVE-2020-27348. It unfortunately affects many many snap packages… [...] The problem arises when the LD_LIBRARY_PATH includes an empty element in its list. When the Dynamic Linker sees an empty element it will look in the current working directory of the process. So if we construct our search paths with an accidental empty element the application inside our Snap Package could be caused to load a shared library from outside the Snap Package’s shipped files. This can lead to an arbitrary code execution. It has been common to put a definition of the LD_LIBRARY_PATH variable into a Snap Package’s snapcraft.yaml that references a predefined $LD_LIBRARY_PATH as if to extend it. Unfortunately, despite this being common, it was poorly understood that SnapD ensures that the $LD_LIBRARY_PATH is unset when starting a Snap Package’s applications. What that means is that where the author tried to extend the variable they have inadvertantly inserted the bad empty element. The empty element appears because $LD_LIBRARY_PATH is unset so the shell will expand it to an empty string.

  • Wait, What? Kids Found A Security Flaw in Linux Mint By Mashing Keys!

    Security flaws can be incredibly stupid and dangerous. Of course, I’m not judging anyone, we are humans after all. But this little incident is quite funny.