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September 2018

Software, Fonts, Themes, and Icons

Filed under
Software
  • Customize Linux Touchpad Gestures with ‘Gestures’ App

    If you want to set-up touchpad gestures on Linux, but don’t know how, you should check out the following app.

    The app is called ‘Gestures’ and is described by its developer as being a “minimal Gtk+ GUI app for libinput-gestures”.

    Windows and macOS both come with a variety of useful touchpad gestures pre-configured out of the box, and offer easy-to-access settings for adjusting or changing gesture behaviour to your liking.

  • MkDocs is the Perfect Open Source Documentation Software

    Whether you are a professional software developer looking for a platform to create elegant documentation for one of you projects, or someone working in a company in need to create an internal documentation for staff, or even just a power user who wants to save some notes in a good fashioned way, MkDocs is the best tool for you.

    MkDocs is a static site generator which is oriented at creating documentation platforms. It’s quite simple, beautiful and easy to configure and deploy. Written in Python, it simply requires you to create your files in Markdown format, and then, just using a single YAML configuration file, it can generate a working static website out of it for you.

  • New version of Culmus (Hebrew) fonts released

    < Many popular Linux distributions have Culmus packages in their repositories. Whether they update those packages during a release cycle and how quickly they adopt new version varies widely from distribution to distribution. /blockquote>

  • Mugricons: These Icons Seems To Fit With Any Kind Of Theme

    You may have your favorite icon theme installed on Linux desktop right now but here is the new icon pack "Mugricons". It is released just few days ago under license GNU General Public License V3, this icon pack borrowed some icons from three icon sets that are: Archdroid, Zafiro and Adwaita.

  • Qogir Theme Pack Looks Fantastic on Linux Desktop

    Some people prefer to use flat design themes, if you are then we present you this theme pack "Qogir". It is based on Arc theme and targets GTK3 and GTK2 based desktop environments. You can install and apply this theme pack, if you are running any of these desktop environments: Gnome, Gnome Shell, Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, Budgie etc.

Linux 4.20~5.0 Progress

Filed under
Linux
  • BigBen PS3OFMINIPAD Gaming Controller To Be Supported By Linux 4.20~5.0

    The PS3OFMINIPAD is a low-cost wired gamepad controller manufactured by UK-based BigBen Interactive and marketed for use with the PlayStation 3 and being a "kid friendly" controller.

    With the next Linux kernel cycle whether it ends up being 4.20 or 5.0, the BigBen PS3OFMINIPAD will now be supported. Queued this past week into the HID-next Git branch is a new driver for supporting this particular controller.

  • Thanks Google: Linux Kernel Finally Nearing Support For The Apple Magic Trackpad 2

    Apple announced the Magic Trackpad 2 almost three years ago to the day while the mainline Linux kernel will finally be supporting this multi-touch device soon.

  • Intel Lands Final Batch Of Display/Graphics Driver Updates For Linux 4.20~5.0

    Intel developers this week sent out their final set of feature updates for the "i915" Direct Rendering Manager driver for the upcoming Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel cycle.

    Complementing the earlier Intel DRM feature updates queued a few weeks back, this week Intel developers sent in their second and final batch of feature updates for this next kernel cycle.

Programming: Python and New Releases From Dirk Eddelbuettel

Filed under
Development
  • Mega-bites of code: Python snakes into 1st place for cyber-attacks [Ed: Another firm pretends that Microsoft GitHub is the same as (or is) FOSS and vice versa. Very many attacks on the GPL have been based on this same lie. And calling Microsoft "top contributor"...]

    "In virtually every security-related topic in GitHub, the majority of the repositories are written in Python, including tools such as w3af, Sqlmap, and even the infamous AutoSploit tool," the company explained on Wednesday in a blog post, adding that hackers enjoy Python's advantages – easy to learn, easy to read, comprehensive libraries – just like everyone else.

  • RcppAPT 0.0.5

    A new version of RcppAPT – our interface from R to the C++ library behind the awesome apt, apt-get, apt-cache, … commands and their cache powering Debian, Ubuntu and the like – is now on CRAN.

    This version is a bit of experiment. I had asked on the r-package-devel and r-devel list how I could suppress builds on macOS. As it does not have the required libapt-pkg-dev library to support the apt, builds always failed. CRAN managed to not try on Solaris or Fedora, but somewhat macOS would fail. Each. And. Every. Time. Sadly, nobody proposed a working solution.

  • nanotime 0.2.3

    nanotime uses the RcppCCTZ package for (efficient) high(er) resolution time parsing and formatting up to nanosecond resolution, and the bit64 package for the actual integer64 arithmetic. Initially implemented using the S3 system, it now uses a more rigorous S4-based approach thanks to a rewrite by Leonardo Silvestri.

    This release disables some tests on the Slowlaris platform we are asked to conform to (which is a good thing as wider variety of test platforms widens test converage) yet have no real access to (which is bad thing, obviously) beyind what the helpful rhub service offers. We also updated the Travis setup. No code changes.

Linux 4.19-rc6

Filed under
Linux

It's been another week, so as normal, another -rc release is here. For
a -rc6 release, it's pretty normal. There are more individual merges
from different trees than -rc5, but the number of changes is much lower
than last week. Lots of different driver tree updates, along with some
some x86 and a risc-v fix.

Full details are in the shortlog below, and as always, please go test
and report any problems. It all "just works" on my systems, and I have
not heard of any major outstanding issues as of this point in time.

Read more

Also: Linux 4.19-rc6 Kernel Released By Greg KH

OSS: CLIP OS, HAIKU, Braiins OS, SDN, SaaS

Filed under
OSS
  • CLIP OS, fighting bias and diagnosing cancer with AI, Consul open source citizen participation platform, and more news

    The National Cybersecurity Agency of France takes digital protection very seriously — so seriously, in fact, that the organization has its own secure operating system, which it's open sourced.

    Called CLIP OS, the operating system is built on Linux and "uses a 'partitioning mechanism' that allows the OS to separate public and sensitive data into two 'totally isolated' software environments." The agency says that CLIP OS is designed to be deployed "on both security gateways and workstations."

    You can learn more about CLIP OS at the project's website or on GitHub. If you want ot use it, you'll need to compile the code yourself.

  • HAIKU R1 Beta 1 released (open source operating systems)

    Open source operating system HAIKU is a lightweight, fast, and relatively simple operating system that picks up where the discontinued BeOS left off when its development ceased in 2001.

    This weekend the HAIKI team released HAIKU R1 Beta 1, which is kind of a big deal when you consider that the last major release of the operating system came in November, 2012.

    I took a look at HAIKU a few months ago when it became clear that the new beta was on the way. Now it’s here, and HAIKU R1 brings a bunch of significant updates.

  • Braiins OS Publishes Open Source Firmware for Mining Rigs

    This week the software developers behind the mining operation Slush Pool have announced a new organization alongside releasing an open source operating system (OS) for cryptocurrency devices. The new offshoot company called Braiins has produced a Linux based system for bitcoin mining rigs and they plan to extend the OS to other digital currency software embedded devices.

  • Are communications service providers confident in open source networking solutions?

    Conducted by Heavy Reading, the multi-client survey spanning six segments across networking technologies – DevOps, automation, cloud native, big data and analytics, open networking performance, software-defined networking (SDN), and management and orchestration (MANO) – indicates continued and increasing importance of open source software for network transformation.

    Key findings indicate CSPs show an unexpected level of sophistication around new technologies and approaches, including adoption of open networking solutions in numerous domains and active automation of processes across operations.

    “From the number of CSPs expecting open source to be a critical component of next-gen networks, to the growing importance of emerging technologies like DevOps and cloud native, it’s encouraging to see open source continue to mature and watch real progress unfold,” said Heather Kirksey, Vice President, Ecosystem and Community, LFN.

    The survey includes responses from 150 CSP representatives across 98 discrete companies worldwide. Bringing an unprecedented look at operator perceptions and experience of open source networking technologies, the survey delivers a comprehensive look at the state of open source in networking today.

  • Challenges to Expect When Open Sourcing your SaaS Business

    In my previous article, I walked through scenarios to help you determine whether to open source your SaaS solution, and discussed the cost-benefit analysis that goes along with this decision. From an open source point of view, there's no point in just chucking code over the wall, slapping on an open source license, and calling it a day. You want to create an inviting community where people want to collaborate and spend time-even socialize!-with you.

    John Mark Walker Chucking code over the wall accomplishes nothing, besides giving others insight into how you do things. Although that may be interesting and beneficial for them, you don't get much benefit unless you create the pathways of collaboration and communication that unlock a thriving community. Thus, you have an inherent interest in doing this The Right Way™.

Web inventor Berners-Lee creates a new privacy first way of dealing with the internet

Filed under
OSS
Web
  • Tim Berners-Lee launches open source project Solid to decentralize the web and place users in control of data
  • The Inventor of the World Wide Web Plans to Start a New Internet to Take on Google and Facebook
  • One Small Step for the Web…
  • World Wide Web inventor plans a new version to bypass big tech companies
  • Web inventor Berners-Lee creates a new privacy first way of dealing with the internet
  • Exclusive: Tim Berners-Lee tells us his radical new plan to upend the World Wide Web

    Last week, Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, asked me to come and see a project he has been working on almost as long as the web itself. It’s a crisp autumn day in Boston, where Berners-Lee works out of an office above a boxing gym. After politely offering me a cup of coffee, he leads us into a sparse conference room. At one end of a long table is a battered laptop covered with stickers. Here, on this computer, he is working on a plan to radically alter how all of us live and work on the web.

  • Tim Berners-Lee Launches Open Source Project Solid To Start A “New Internet”

    Due to the continuous torrent of data breaches and scandals like Cambridge Analytica, Tim Berners-Lee is devastated. To fight the powerful forces of the Internet, world wide web inventor has worked on a project called “Solid.”

    In collaboration with MIT, the open-source project is build to make web decentralized, snatch power from big players like Facebook, Google, Amazon, etc. Solid offers tools to create social applications which follow the existing W3C standards. In simple words, you will have a tremendous amount of control over your data.

  • One Small Step for the Web...

    I’ve always believed the web is for everyone. That's why I and others fight fiercely to protect it. The changes we’ve managed to bring have created a better and more connected world. But for all the good we’ve achieved, the web has evolved into an engine of inequity and division; swayed by powerful forces who use it for their own agendas.

    Today, I believe we’ve reached a critical tipping point, and that powerful change for the better is possible - and necessary.

    This is why I have, over recent years, been working with a few people at MIT and elsewhere to develop Solid, an open-source project to restore the power and agency of individuals on the web.

    Solid changes the current model where users have to hand over personal data to digital giants in exchange for perceived value. As we’ve all discovered, this hasn’t been in our best interests. Solid is how we evolve the web in order to restore balance - by giving every one of us complete control over data, personal or not, in a revolutionary way.

    Solid is a platform, built using the existing web. It gives every user a choice about where data is stored, which specific people and groups can access select elements, and which apps you use. It allows you, your family and colleagues, to link and share data with anyone. It allows people to look at the same data with different apps at the same time.

    Solid unleashes incredible opportunities for creativity, problem-solving and commerce. It will empower individuals, developers and businesses with entirely new ways to conceive, build and find innovative, trusted and beneficial applications and services. I see multiple market possibilities, including Solid apps and Solid data storage.

Software: Cozy, Editors, and pyRenamer

Filed under
Software
  • Cozy is a Cozy Little Audiobook Player for Linux

    Audiobooks are a great way to consume literature. Many people who don’t have time to read, choose to listen. Most people, myself included, just use a regular media player like VLC or MPV for listening to audiobooks on Linux.

    Today, we will look at a Linux application built solely for listening to audiobooks.

  • Offline WYSIWYG in 2018 - A dying breed

    Once upon a time, visual HTML editors were all the rage. You would open a browser-like program and just type your pages, without thinking too much about the source code, the scripts, or even the looks. The magic happened somewhere behind the scenes. Then, slowly but surely, online CMS started showing up, and eventually became the modern norm. But what if you still want to write Web stuff offline?

    It does sound a bit like a paradox - after all, you WILL be uploading your material one day. Still, being able to write in an offline manner has its perks and convenience. Moreover, if you do not use any CMS, writing pure HTML can be tedious. Having a nice frontend helps you focus on what you want people to read, not necessarily what machines ought to be interpretting and displaying. The question is, how difficult is this to achieve in the year 2018?

  • pyRenamer: Bulk Renaming Made Easy

    Renaming files in batches is a rare task. Probably, that is why, with the exception of Xfce’s Thunar, desktop file managers can only rename files one at a time. However, when I digitize music, I am dealing with ten or more files per albums, and I need a bulk renamer. Of course, I could use the rename command, and, using it four or fives a week, I would soon get to know the options I wanted. However, for such a repetitive task, a desktop tool is more convenient. It was with this need that I rediscovered pyRenamer for the second or third time. As I quickly remembered, it is by far the most versatile of all the alternatives.

    As the name suggests, pyRenamer is written in Python, and offers most of the options of the rename command. It comes with only brief online help embeeded in the interface, but, aside from a few obscure features, is easy enough to figure out by trial and error. By default, the interface consists of a directory manager on the top left, and a pane on the top right for the files in the currently selected directory. On the bottom left are the options for renaming, and on the bottom right the controls. Users can also choose to select View | Show Options to add an option pane on the top right. The options include such useful functions, as automatically preserving file name extensions and showing a preview of the selected renaming options. The Options pane can also be used to enter regular expressions to limit the file names that are bout to be renamed.

More in Tux Machines

The 10 Best Linux Network Monitoring Tools

Having total control over your network is essential to prevent programs from overusing your network resources and slowing down the overall performance. This is why you should install a network monitoring tool on your system, giving you a visual overview of everything that’s happening on your network. To help you out, we have put together a list of the ten best Linux network monitoring tools. All the tools mentioned here are open-source and follows an easy and intuitive UI (mostly command-line based) to help you monitor the bandwidth usage on your network. Read more

Programming: GNOME, CI/CD, Go and Qt

  • Bilal Elmoussaoui: libhandy-rs v0.6.0 is out!

    Recently I kind of took over the maintainership of libhandy-rs, the Rust bindings of libhandy. I have since then been preparing for a new release so that Rust & GTK app developers can update to the latest gtk-rs release as soon as possible. I also heavily depend on it on my various little apps.

  • Easily speed up CI by reducing download size

    Every time a CI pipeline runs on GitLab, it downloads the git repository for your project. Often, pipeline jobs are set up to make further downloads (of dependencies or subprojects), which are also run on each job.

  • What you need to know about automation testing in CI/CD

    Test automation means focusing continuously on detecting defects, errors, and bugs as early and quickly as possible in the software development process. This is done using tools that pursue quality as the highest value and are put in place to ensure quality—not just pursue it. One of the most compelling features of a continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) solution (also called a DevOps pipeline) is the opportunity to test more frequently without burdening developers or operators with more manual work. Let's talk about why that's important.

  • Generics for Go

    The Go programming language was first released in 2009, with its 1.0 release made in March 2012. Even before the 1.0 release, some developers criticized the language as being too simplistic, partly due to its lack of user-defined generic types and functions parameterized by type. Despite this omission, Go is widely used, with an estimated 1-2 million developers worldwide. Over the years there have been several proposals to add some form of generics to the language, but the recent proposal written by core developers Ian Lance Taylor and Robert Griesemer looks likely to be included in a future version of Go. [...] Generics, also known as "parameterized types" or "parametric polymorphism", are a way to write code or build data structures that will work for any data type; the code or data structure can be instantiated to process each different data type, without having to duplicate code. They're useful when writing generalized algorithms like sorting and searching, as well as type-independent data structures like trees, thread-safe maps, and so on. For example, a developer might write a generic min() function that works on all integer and floating-point types, or create a binary tree that can associate a key type to a value type (and work with strings, integers, or user-defined types). With generics, you can write this kind of code without any duplication, and the compiler will still statically check the types.

  • Fixing a common antipattern when loading translations in Qt

    I’m a Polish guy working with computers, mostly on Windows. However, the lingua franca of the IT industry is English, so every time I see a tutorial for some dev tool, it’s in that language. To lessen the burden of decoding which menu entry in the tutorial corresponds to which menu entry on my PC I decided to run the system with an English display language. I still want the rest of the i18n-related stuff (date format, keyboard, currency etc.) to be in Polish however. [...] As you can see, Thunderbird and Windows Settings show up in English but Qt Linguist is encrypted with some overengineered Slavic cipher (aka Polish language). What I further noticed, is that this incorrect language selection is particularly prevalent in Qt-based applications. Subsequent digging revealed that this antipattern is widespread in Qt world, see the relevant GitHub search (requires login).

today's leftovers and howtos

  • Digest of YaST Development Sprint 103

    Before introducing the recent changes in the YaST land, the team would like to congratulate the openSUSE community for the release of Leap 15.2. It looks like a pretty solid release, and we are proud of being part of this project. Having said that, let’s focus on what the team has achieved during the past sprint.

  • [syslog-ng] Insider 2020-07: TLS; capabilities; 3.27;

    This is the 83rd issue of syslog-ng Insider, a monthly newsletter that brings you syslog-ng-related news.

  •         
  • Top 6 Open Source Bitcoin Wallets, Rated and Reviewed for 2020

    The biggest appeal of open source wallets is that their code can be reviewed and publicly audited for potential security issues. As a result, open source software is often more robust than closed-source. The same goes for bitcoin wallets. [...] Whether you’re a beginner who needs a fantastic UI to help you navigate the intricacies of an open source wallet or you’re a developer who needs a platform that allows you to build on a secure base, these wallets will give you everything you’re looking for.

  •        
  • Android 10 has the fastest update rate ever, hits 16% of users in 10 months

    Google today dropped a blog post detailing its progress on improving the Android ecosystem's update speed. The company has been hard at work for the past few years modularizing Android, with the hope that making Android easier to update would result in device manufacturers pushing out updates faster. Google's efforts have been paying off, with the company announcing Android 10 has had the fastest rollout ever. The last few versions of Android have each brought a major improvement to Android's update system. Android 8 introduced Project Treble, which separated the OS from the hardware support, enabling easier porting of Android across devices. In Android 9 Pie, Google completed its work on Treble and started publishing Generic System Images (GSIs): drop-in versions of Android that work on any Project Treble-compatible device. Android 10 introduced Project Mainline and the new APEX file type designed for updatable lower-level system components, delivered through the Play Store. Google's stats show that all this work is actually improving the ecosystem. "Thanks to these efforts," Google writes, "the adoption of Android 10 has been faster than any previous versions of Android. Android 10 was running on 100 million devices 5 months post launch—28% faster than Android Pie."

  • LibreOffice QA/Dev Report: June 2020
  • Phoronix Test Suite 9.8 Released For Open-Source Benchmarking, New Docker Benchmarking Image

    Phoronix Test Suite 9.8 is available today as the latest quarterly stable feature release to our open-source, cross-platform benchmarking software. Phoronix Test Suite 9.8 brings numerous improvements as our Q3'2020 update including: - Improved handling of test installation failures around failed download URLs and other cases where newer minor revisions of said test profiles have corrected them. The new behavior is to seamlessly use the new minor revisions of test profile updates to correct said failures rather than requiring manual intervention over the version specified.

  • How to convert an ISO to a Docker image
  • How To Set Up Nginx Server Blocks on Ubuntu 20.04
  • How to Install MariaDB on Ubuntu 16.04 Linux Operating System

Servers: Kubernetes, MicroK8s and Ubuntu

  • What’s up with the Kubernetes ecosystem

    This week’s acquisition of Rancher Labs by the veteran enterprise Linux firm SUSE neatly illustrates the growing momentum of container-based application deployment. It also underlines the importance of Kubernetes as the orchestration tool of choice for managing all those containers. So, what does this latest move mean for the broader Kubernetes ecosystem? When containers first garnered corporate attention six or seven years ago, Docker and its tools were the centre of attention. But the focus soon shifted to management frameworks capable of automating the deployment and scaling of containers, and Kubernetes, developed by Google from technology used in its cloud platform, quickly won out. Like many open source tools, Kubernetes has its share of rough edges and does not necessarily provide all the capabilities that users need to build a functioning container-based infrastructure. Companies such as Rancher sprang forth to provide a complete software stack built around Kubernetes for those who didn’t want to build it all themselves.

  • MicroK8s HA tech preview is now available
  • Ubuntu Support of AWS Graviton2 Instances
  • Ubuntu Support of AWS Graviton2 Instances

    Ubuntu is the industry-leading operating system for use in the cloud. Every day millions of Ubuntu instances are launched in private and public clouds around the world. Canonical takes pride in offering support for the latest cloud features and functionality. As of today, all Ubuntu Amazon Web Services (AWS) Marketplace listings are now updated to include support for the new Graviton2 instance types. Graviton2 is Amazon’s next-generation ARM processor delivering increased performance at a lower cost. This