Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

February 2019

Programming: Clang, Eclipse, Qt, Python and More

Filed under
Development

i.MX8M based SMARC module available with new carrier board

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Embedian has launched a “SMARC-iMX8M” module that runs Linux on an i.MX8M SoC with up to 4GB LPDDR4, 16GB eMMC, and -40 to 85° support. There’s also a new carrier designed for SMARC 2.0 modules.

Embedian has long developed Linux-powered SMARC modules based on NXP i.MX SoCs, such as its i.MX6 based SMARC-FiMX6 and i.MX7 based SMARC-FiMX7. Now it has returned with an 82 x 50mm SMARC 2.0 module built around the 64-bit, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M. The SMARC-iMX8M runs Yocto Project, Ubuntu 16.04 ARM64 LTS, Debian 9, or Android 8.1 “Oreo” on Dual, Quad Lite, and Quad Core i.MX8M modules.

Read more

Security: Updates, Cmd, Supermicro, Reproducible Builds and Qualcomm Binary Blobs

Filed under
Security
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Linux security: Cmd provides visibility, control over user activity
  • Supermicro hardware weaknesses let researchers backdoor an IBM cloud server

    In short, BMCs are motherboard-attached microcontrollers that give extraordinary control over servers inside datacenters. Using the Intelligent Platform Management Interface, admins can reinstall operating systems, install or modify apps, and make configuration changes to large numbers of servers, without physically being on premises and, in many cases, without the servers being turned on. In 2013, researchers warned that BMCs that came preinstalled in servers from Dell, HP, and other name-brand manufacturers were so poorly secured that they gave attackers a stealthy and convenient way to take over entire fleets of servers inside datacenters.

    Researchers at security firm Eclypsium on Tuesday plan to publish a paper about how BMC vulnerabilities threaten a premium cloud service provided by IBM and possibly other providers. The premium service is known as bare-metal cloud computing, an option offered to customers who want to store especially sensitive data but don't want it to intermingle on the same servers other customers are using. The premium lets customers buy exclusive access to dedicated physical servers for as long as needed and, when the servers are no longer needed, return them to the cloud provider. The provider, in theory, wipes the servers clean so they can be safely used by another bare-metal customer.

  • Reproducible builds folks: Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #200

    Holger Levsen submitted the Reproducible Builds project to the May/August 2019 round of Outreachy. Outreachy provides internships to work free software. Internships are open to applicants around the world, working remotely and are not required to move. Interns are paid a stipend of $5,500 for the three month internship and have an additional $500 travel stipend to attend conferences/events. So far, we received more than ten initial requests from candidates. The closing date for applicants is April 2nd. More information is available on the application page.

  • Ubuntu Touch OTA-8 Won't Move To Mir 1.1 + Unity 8 Due To Qualcomm Binary Blob Issues

    The Ubuntu Touch community team has put out their latest questions/answers about this effort continuing to let the Ubuntu effort live on for mobile devices like the Nexus and other hardware as well as looking ahead to get this mobile operating system running on the likes of Librem 5 and Pine64 phones.

Wind River Linux and VxWorks team up for new Helix Virtualization Platform

Filed under
OS
Linux

Wind River Helix Virtualization Platform combines Wind River Linux and VxWorks under a common, cloud-managed edge computing platform. Features include virtualization and safety certified functionality, and support for guest OSes and mixed-criticality workloads.

Read more

What are the Different Text Editors for Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software
Ubuntu

A myriad of text editors are available for Ubuntu, and if you use them well, you may as well join the expert group of Linux code developers. In the article, we will look at some of the best text editors for Ubuntu 18.04 that you can use to take programming to the next level. A reliable text editor should guide you through features such as auto-complete, plugins and many other features that simplify programming tasks.

Read more

Also: ONLYOFFICE Announces Blockchain-Based End-to-End Document Encryption

Mozilla: Ecma TC39, VR Jingle Smash Performance Work and Common Voice

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Announcing a New Management Structure for Ecma TC39

    In 2019, Ecma’s TC39 (the standardizing body behind JavaScript/ECMAScript) will be trying something new. The committee has grown in the last few years. As a result, the requirements of running the meeting have grown. To give you an idea of the scale — between 40 and 60 delegates (and sometimes more) meet 6 times a year to discuss proposed changes to the ECMAScript specification. Since we have grown so much, we will be changing our management structure. We will move away from single-chair and vice-chair roles to a flat hierarchy with three chairs sharing the responsibility.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Jingle Smash: Performance Work

    Performance was the final step to making Jingle Smash, my block tumbling VR game, ready to ship. WebVR on low-end mobile devices like the Oculus Go can be slow, but with a little work we can at least get over a consistent 30fps, and usually 45 or above. Here's the steps I used to get Jingle Smash working well.

  • Mozilla Open Innovation Team: Sustainable tech development needs local solutions: Voice tech ideation in Kigali

    Developers, researchers and startups around the globe working on voice-recognition technology face one problem alike: A lack of freely available voice data in their respective language to train AI-powered Speech-to-Text engines.

    Although machine-learning algorithms like Mozilla’s Deep Speech are in the public domain, training data is limited. Most of the voice data used by large corporations is not available to the majority of people, expensive to obtain or simply non-existent for languages not globally spread. The innovative potential of this technology is widely untapped. In providing open datasets, we aim to take away the onerous tasks of collecting and annotating data, which eventually reduces one of the main barriers to voice-based technologies and makes front-runner innovations accessible to more entrepreneurs. This is one of the major drivers behind our project Common Voice.

    Common Voice is our crowdsourcing initiative and platform to collect and verify voice data and to make it publicly available. But to get more people involved from around the world and to speed up the process of getting to data sets large enough for training purposes, we rely on partners — like-minded commercial and non-commercial organizations with an interest to make technology available and useful to all.

Go 1.12 is released

Filed under
Development
Google

Today the Go team is happy to announce the release of Go 1.12. You can get it from the download page.

For details about the changes in Go 1.12, see the Go 1.12 release notes.

Some of the highlights include opt-in support for TLS 1.3, improved modules support (in preparation for being the default in Go 1.13), support for windows/arm, and improved macOS & iOS forwards compatibility.

Read more

Phoronix: Golang 1.12 Released With Opt-In TLS 1.3, Better Modules Support & Performance Work

LWN: Go 1.12 released

LibreELEC (Leia) 9.0.1 MR

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

LibreELEC 9.0.1 (Leia) has arrived based upon Kodi v18.1, the 9.0.1 release contains many changes and refinements to user experience and a complete overhaul of the underlying OS core to improve stability and extend hardware support. Kodi v18 also brings new features like Kodi Retroplayer and DRM support that (equipped with an appropriate add-on) allows Kodi to unofficially stream content from services like Netflix and Amazon.

Read more

Beaker: the Decentralized Read-Write Browser

Filed under
Web

The Beaker Browser project is creating a decentralized peer-to-peer web browser that, if successful, could return the web to its users. Let's explore how this is done!

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Debian: CUPS, LTS and Archival

  • Praise Be CUPS Driverless Printing

    Last Tuesday, I finally got to start updating $work's many desktop computers to Debian Buster. I use Puppet to manage them remotely, so major upgrades basically mean reinstalling machines from scratch and running Puppet. Over the years, the main upgrade hurdle has always been making our very large and very complicated printers work on Debian. Unsurprisingly, the blog posts I have written on that topic are very popular and get me a few 'thank you' emails per month. I'm very happy to say, thanks to CUPS Driverless Printing (CUPS 2.2.2+), all those trials and tribulations are finally over. Printing on Buster just works. Yes yes, even color booklets printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Archiving 20 years of online content

    mailman2 is pretty great. You can get a dump of an email list pretty easily and mailman3's web frontend, the lovely hyperkitty, is well, lovely. Importing a legacy mailman2 mbox went without a hitch thanks to the awesome hyperkitty_import importer. Kudos to the Debian Mailman Team for packaging this in Debian for us. But what about cramming a Yahoo! Group mailing list in hyperkitty? I wouldn't recommend it. After way too many hours spent battling character encoding errors I just decided people that wanted to read obscure emails from 2003 would have to deal with broken accents and shit. But hey, it kinda works! Oh, and yes, archiving a Yahoo! Group with an old borken Perl script wasn't an easy task. Hell, I kept getting blacklisted by Yahoo! for scraping too much data to their liking. I ended up patching together the results of multiple runs over a few weeks to get the full mbox and attachments. By the way, if anyone knows how to tell hyperkitty to stop at a certain year (i.e. not display links for 2019 when the list stopped in 2006), please ping me.

Running The AMD "ABBA" Ryzen 3000 Boost Fix Under Linux With 140 Tests

Last week AMD's AGESA "ABBA" update began shipping with a fix to how the boost clock frequencies are handled in hopes of better achieving the rated boost frequencies for Ryzen 3000 series processors. I've been running some tests of an updated ASUS BIOS with this adjusted boost clock behavior to see how it performs under Linux with a Ryzen 9 3900X processor. The AGESA 1.0.0.3 ABBA update has an improved boost clock frequency algorithm along with changes to the idle state handling. This AGESA update should better position AMD Ryzen 3000 processors with the boost clock behavior expected by users with better hitting the maximum boost frequency and doing so more aggressively. Read more

Stable kernels 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145

  • Linux 5.2.16
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.16 kernel. All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.74
  • Linux 4.14.145

Linux Container Technology Explained (Contributed)

State and local governments’ IT departments increasingly rely on DevOps practices and agile development methodologies to improve service delivery and to help maintain a culture of constant collaboration, iteration, and flexibility among all stakeholders and teams. However, when an IT department adopts agile and DevOps practices and methodologies, traditional IT problems still need to be solved. One long-standing problem is “environmental drift,” when the code and configurations for applications and their underlying infrastructure can vary between different environments. State and local IT teams often lack the tools necessary to mitigate the effects of environmental drift, which can hamper collaboration and agility efforts. Read more