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May 2019

openSUSE Leap 42.3 Linux OS to Reach End of Life on June 30th, 2019

Filed under
OS
SUSE

Launched on July 26, 2017, OpenSuSE Leap 42.3 was based on the SUSE Linux Enterprise (SLE) 12 Service Pack (SP) 3 operating system and it was powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel series.

openSUSE Leap 42.3 was initially supposed to be supported until January 2019, but the openSUSE Project decided to give users six more months to upgrade to the latest openSUSE Leap 15 operating system series.

Now that openSUSE Leap 15.1 is here as the latest and greatest openSUSE Leap release, it's time for openSUSE Leap 42.3 users to upgrade their installations, and they only have one month to do that, until June 30th, 2019.

Read more

Hybrid RK3399 COM/SBC hacker board can plug into feature-rich carrier

Filed under
Android
Linux

FriendlyElec’s $75, RK3399-based “SOM-RK3399” COM/SBC hybrid can stand alone or expand with a $120 “SOM-RK3399 Dev Kit” with -20 to 70℃ support and M.2 and mini-PCIe expansion.

Last year, FriendlyElec released two open-spec SBCs that ran Linux and Android on the hexa-core Rockchip RK3399: the $65 and up NanoPi M4 and the smaller, $50 NanoPi Neo4. Now, FriendlyElec has launched an RK3399-based SOM-RK3399 compute module for $75 that is available with a sandwich-style, $120 SOM-RK3399 Dev Kit. The module also qualifies as an SBC by dint of its dual USB Type-C ports.

The SOM-RK3399, which we saw on CNXSoft, is FriendlyElec’s second compute module after the Samsung S5P6818-based Smart6818 module found on its Octa-Core 64-bit AiO Android System touch-panel computer. Like Shenzhen Wesion’s RK3399-based Khadas Edge, it can operate standalone or be deployed as part of a sandwich-style SBC via an edge connector. The SOM-RK3399 is more COM-like than the Khadas Edge, which offers more real-world ports.

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Dell releases more high-end Ubuntu Linux laptops

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Canonical and Ubuntu Linux founder Mark Shuttleworth recently said, "We have seen companies signing up for Linux desktop support, because they want to have fleets of Ubuntu desktop for their artificial intelligence engineers."

Dell has noticed, too.

Dell Senior Architect Barton George announced: "If mobile power is what you're looking for, you've come to the right place. And if AI is your need, the Precision 7540 and 7740 might just be what you've been looking for."

Linux PCs may never catch up with Windows on consumer laptops, but they are starting to make a bigger impression on developer laptops. Even Microsoft is now building Linux into Windows with Windows Subsystem for Linux. Why? Because today's developers are working on projects such as Kubernetes, AI, cloud-native computing, and machine learning, which live and die on Linux.

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DragonFlyBSD's Kernel Optimizations Are Paying Off - 3 BSDs & 5 Linux OS Benchmarks On Threadripper

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

DragonFlyBSD lead developer Matthew Dillon has been working on a big VM rework in the name of performance and other kernel improvements recently. Here is a look at how those DragonFlyBSD 5.5-DEVELOPMENT improvements are paying off compared to DragonFlyBSD 5.4 as well as FreeBSD 12 and five Linux distribution releases. With Dillon using an AMD Ryzen Threadripper system, we used that too for this round of BSD vs. Linux performance benchmarks.

The work by Dillon on the VM overhaul and other changes (including more HAMMER2 file-system work) will ultimately culminate with the DragonFlyBSD 5.6 release (well, unless he opts for DragonFlyBSD 6.0 or so). These are benchmarks of the latest DragonFlyBSD 5.5-DEVELOPMENT daily ISO as of this week benchmarked across DragonFlyBSD 5.4.3 stable, FreeBSD 12.0, Ubuntu 19.04, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.0, Debian 9.9, Debian Buster, and CentOS 7 1810 as a wide variety of reference points both from newer and older Linux distributions. (As for no Clear Linux reference point for a speedy reference point, it currently has a regression with AMD + Samsung NVMe SSD support on some hardware, including this box, prohibiting the drive from coming up due to a presumed power management issue that is still being resolved.)

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Stable kernels 5.1.6, 5.0.20, 4.19.47, 4.14.123 , and 4.9.180

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.1.6

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.1.6 kernel.

    All users of the 5.1 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.1.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.1.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.0.20
  • Linux 4.19.47
  • Linux 4.14.123
  • Linux 4.9.180

antiX MX Linux 18.3 Released with Latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.9 "Stretch" Updates

Filed under
Linux
Debian

MX Linux 18.3 is now available and ships with Linux kernel 4.19.37-2 and it's fully synced with the software repositories of the latest Debian GNU/Linux 9.9 "Stretch" operating system release, which means that it is fully patched against the recently disclosed Intel MDS (Microarchitectural Data Sampling) security vulnerabilities found in Intel microprocessors.

This release also includes an updated installer (mx-installer) that now lets users input system configuration selections during installation while the installer copies the system files to speed up the installation process. The UEFI boot installation was improved as well in MX Linux 18.3, which should now be compatible with more UEFI systems.

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Deepin Linux: Security Threat or Safe to Use?

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Deepin Linux continues to show promise as a productive computing platform. This latest edition has fewer of the annoyances that plagued earlier releases.

The menus and internal dialogue boxes still have some Chinese characters. The potential user base is limited by a short list of available languages.

The ISO file on the standard download page is not a live session. It provides only a loadable interface to handle installation.

To get the live session ISO file, use the download page link in the previous paragraph. Then scroll to the bottom of the download options to the "Live Session Download" label and click the "Live Official Release" button.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Foliate is an Epic eBook Reader App for Linux Desktops

    Foliate is a new ebook reader app for Linux desktops whose streamlined, stylish GUI recently caught my eye.

    While I, personally, still find it easier to read ebooks on a dedicated e-reader device with an e-ink screen (like an Amazon Kindle) I do appreciate that there are features desktop ebook reader apps can offer that a dedicated e-reading device can not.

    Many of which you’ll find on offer in the ‘pages’ of Foliate, which pitches itself as a “simple and modern ebook viewer” for Linux desktops.

    Keen to learn more?

    Let’s dive in.

  • LibreOffice monthly recap: May 2019

    We started with a new Month of LibreOffice. These are twice-yearly campaigns where we encourage people to join our community and help to improve the software. Everyone who contributes can claim a cool sticker pack at the end – and this year, we have some exclusive glass mugs for a randomly selected bunch of winners too!

  • Lack of leadership in open source results in source-available licenses

    Don’t get me wrong — there will still be open source, lots and lots of it. But authors of open-source infrastructure software will put their interesting features in their “enterprise” versions if we as an industry cannot solve the Amazon problem.

    Unfortunately, the dark cloud on the horizon I wrote about back in November has drifted closer. Amazon has exhibited three particularly offensive and aggressive behaviors toward open source: [...]

  • Tantek Çelik: The @W3C Needs You: Please Vote For Change In The @W3CAB Election

    Please Vote in the 2019 W3C Advisory Board Election (W3C Member-only link, only Advisory Committee members can vote).

    My fellow Advisory Board (AB) candidates and additional members of the W3C Community have shared their thoughts on the AB election, some on their blogs, and some on W3C Member only list(s).

    It is very important that you explicitly rank candidates according to what is most important to you due to the way the current W3C STV mechanism is interpreted and implemented by the W3C Team. Past STV elections have shown that a Ranked 1 vote is crucial to candidates, Ranked 2 may have some impact, and the likelihood of effect drops off precipitously from there (though you should still rank at least a few more, ideally all candidates, just in case).

  • Huawei can now add the IEEE to the growing list of companies banning it

    "IEEE complies with US government regulations which restrict the ability of the listed Huawei companies and their employees to participate in certain activities that are not generally open to the public. This includes certain aspects of the publication peer review and editorial process," the organisation said.

  • Guest Post: Export Restrictions, Membership Organizations and Huawei

    New U.S. sanctions against Huawei in the escalating U.S. – China trade war have thrown another wrench into the gears of global commerce. But how do these sanctions affect standards organizations and open source development? The high level answer is that the impact will be significant for most standards organizations, and negligible for most open source projects. The major differentiator will be the degree of transparency of the organization in question.

    The details, and the answer for any given organization, however are much more complicated, and the political landscape remains dynamic and subject to change.

  • Microsoft’s Universal Windows Platform app dream is dead and buried

    Microsoft had a dream with Windows 8 that involved universal Windows apps that would span across phones, tablets, PCs, and even Xbox consoles. The plan was that app developers could write a single app for all of these devices, and it would magically span across them all. This dream really started to fall apart after Windows Phone failed, but it’s well and truly over now.

    Microsoft has spent years pushing developers to create special apps for the company’s Universal Windows Platform (UWP), and today, it’s putting the final nail in the UWP coffin. Microsoft is finally allowing game developers to bring full native Win32 games to the Microsoft Store, meaning the many games that developers publish on popular stores like Steam don’t have to be rebuilt for UWP.

    “We recognize that Win32 is the app format that game developers love to use and gamers love to play, so we are excited to share that we will be enabling full support for native Win32 games to the Microsoft Store on Windows,” explains Microsoft’s gaming chief Phil Spencer. “This will unlock more options for developers and gamers alike, allowing for the customization and control they’ve come to expect from the open Windows gaming ecosystem.”

  • Microsoft Wanted To Create History With UWP; Now It’s Turning Back
  • Cepsa Powers New Digital Customer Experiences with Red Hat-based Container Platform
  • Alibaba Cloud Launches 10+ New Products And Features @ APAC Summit

    Alibaba Cloud, the data intelligence backbone of Alibaba Group, is focused on providing the Asia Pacific region with a cloud service to drive a highly integrated technology ecosystem. In line with its goal, Alibaba Cloud today launched more than 10 new products and features at the Alibaba Cloud APAC Summit. The company also announced a new accelerator program connecting technology partners with the Alibaba ecosystem.

  • Contributing to Open Source with Docker, Inc

    The rumors have finally been confirmed. Docker, Inc. is opening their new R&D center in Sofia. At an event last night, they stated their intentions to do a fair amount of product development in Sofia as well as contribute to the local society/community too (if I got this correctly). This is very good news for the local eco-system so congrats for that from my side!

    This blog post outlines my impressions from the event and a few related more general thoughts.

Debian: Outreachy interns and Free software activities in OSI Etc.

Filed under
Debian

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

  • Font Management On Linux - YouTube

    Many new-to-Linux users have questions about installing fonts and previewing fonts on Linux. While there are some nice GUI applications that help with these tasks, you don't actually need to install any extra programs to manage your fonts.

  • Dmenu Is Great So I'll Keep Simping For It - YouTube

    At this point the only Suckless tool I actively use is Dmenu, it's an absolute great launcher especially if you're the kind of person who doesn't really care about having a super fancy looking app, Dmenu is functional and that's all it needs to be.

  • Remove ^M (CTRL-M) Characters from a File in Linux - Putorius

    Operating systems have different ways to handle a newline in their text editors. For example Windows uses a specific carriage return (CR) which is depicted as ^M on Linux, followed by a line feed (LF) to indicate a newline. Linux and UNIX on the other hand use only the line feed to denote the end of a line. This often causes issues when transferring (or even copy and pasting) a file from Windows to Linux. It is hard to spot, and often leaves people scratching their head and wondering why their configuration file is not working.

  • How to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install fonts in Gimp on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to Install Rocket.Chat on CentOS 8

    Rocket.Chat is a free and open-source chat and messaging application built with Meteor. It is an alternative to Slack and allows you to chat with other members, make video and audio calls, create channels and private groups, share files, and folders and many more. It is self-hosted and helps your team to communicate and share ideas on desktop and mobile devices.

  • How to Check Ubuntu Version with Command or Script

    The lsb-release is the standard package for reporting the version on Ubuntu systems. Which is basically written in Python programming language. The lsb-release package provides a command lsb_release used to check Ubuntu version and codename on command line. In this tutorial, you will learn various options to lsb_release command on Ubuntu system.

  • Updated Docker pages

Jetson Xavier system bundles LIPSedge 3D vision camera

LIPS’ IP67-protected “LIPSedge AE400” 3D vision industrial camera is now available with Aaeon’s Linux-driven, AGX Xavier based Boxer-8240AI computer. The RK3399-based camera is built around an Intel RealSense D415 and offers GbE with PoE. Aaeon announced that its Boxer-8240AI edge AI system based on Nvidia’s high-end Jetson AGX Xavier module has received Nvidia Isaac Certification for a bundle that combines the compact, embedded system with LIPS Corp’s LIPSedge AE400 Industrial 3D Camera. The camera is billed as an industrial version of the Intel RealSense dual-lens stereovision camera. Applications for the Aaeon/LIPS offering include autonomous guided vehicles (AGV), vision guided robots, and smart factory systems. Read more

Release of t2 GNU/Linux 20.10

  • T2 20.10 tagged and shipping!

    A decade in the making, T2 version 20.10 was finally tagged and shipped! Grab your favorite release ISO, e.g. highly optimized AMD64, PPC64 for your PS3, MIPS64 for your Sgi Octane or any other of our release builds for playing along at home!

  • t2 Linux 20.10 released

    The 20.10 release of the t2 Linux distribution is available.

Canonical/Ubuntu: FOSDEM 2021 Community DevRoom, Snap Store and Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

  • Laura Czajkowski: FOSDEM Community Devroom 2021 CFP

    The twenty-first edition of FOSDEM will take place 6-7 February, 2021 – online, and we’re happy to announce that there will be a virtual Community DevRoom as part of the event.

  • When you need the numbers just right – benchmark and profiling applications in the Snap Store | Ubuntu

    The world of software is a vast and complex one, often too difficult to easily assess by human intuition alone. Which is why detailed and accurate measurements of software behavior are essential in helping us understand and gauge how well our applications perform. The Snap Store has a fair share of productivity tools and utilities, including a wide range of benchmarking and profiling tools. These are designed to help developers, system administrators and hardcore enthusiasts get a precise sense of their software, whether as part of research and design or for troubleshooting ongoing problems in production environments. Let’s have a little tour.

  • Ubuntu Fridge | Ubuntu Technical Board Call For Nominations

    The Ubuntu Technical Board is responsible for the technical direction of Ubuntu. It makes decisions on package selection, packaging policy, installation systems and processes, kernel, X server, display management, library versions, and dependencies. The board works with relevant teams to establish a consensus on the right path to take, especially where diverse elements of Ubuntu cannot find consensus on shared components. The current Technical Board is expiring at the end of the year, and the Community Council would like to confirm a new Technical Board, consisting of five people, who will serve for two years.