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July 2019

4 best Linux sticky-note apps

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

There are a lot of great sticky-note apps on the Linux platform that allows users to quickly paste thoughts, lists, and other important information to notes in the form of virtual Post-it notes. But what app is best? Let’s find out in this list of the 5 best Linux sticky-note apps for Linux!

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux Pet Peeves: 5 Things That Really Grind my Gears
  • LHS Episode #293: Have Lawn Chair Will Broadcast

    Welcome to the 293rd installment of Linux in the Ham Shack! In the episode, the hosts tackle topics from upcoming RSGB contests on the new, hot FT-4 mode, the origin of "Mayday" as a distress call, magloop antennas, CoreCtrl, the vanishing floppy disk, DMR (Digital Mobile Radio) and much more. Thank you for tuning in and have a wonderful week.

  • DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH) Update – Detecting Managed Networks and User Choice

    At Mozilla, we are continuing to experiment with DNS-over-HTTPS (DoH), a new network protocol that encrypts Domain Name System (DNS) requests and responses. This post outlines a new study we will be conducting to gauge how many Firefox users in the United States are using parental controls or enterprise DNS configurations.

    With previous studies, we have tried to understand the performance impacts of DoH, and the results have been very promising. We found that DoH queries are typically the same speed or slightly slower than DNS queries, and in some cases can be significantly faster. Furthermore, we found that web pages that are hosted by Akamai–a content distribution network, or “CDN”–have similar performance when DoH is enabled. As such, DoH has the potential to improve user privacy on the internet without impeding user experience.

    Now that we’re satisfied with the performance of DoH, we are shifting our attention to how we will interact with existing DNS configurations that users have chosen.  For example, network operators often want to filter out various kinds of content. Parents and schools in particular may use “parental controls”, which block access to websites that are considered unsuitable for children. These controls may also block access to malware and phishing websites. DNS is commonly used to implement this kind of content filtering.

  • New CSS Features in Firefox 68

    Firefox 68 landed earlier this month with a bunch of CSS additions and changes. In this blog post we will take a look at some of the things you can expect to find, that might have been missed in earlier announcements.

  • How to Build a Career in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning?

    Math is just one of the skillsets that aspiring AI and ML professionals are expected to have. This is only one half the requirement, the other half is one’s expertise in programming languages, such as Java, C++, Python, and R.

    While C++ helps engineers increase the speed of their coding process, Python will help them understand and create complex algorithms. Python is also the go-to choice for ML developers, and also offers various libraries and frameworks to ease the process of creating an AI model. Similarly, R and Java help professionals understand stats and implement mappers, respectively. They are important considering the role of visualization in explaining AI.

Linux: Systemd, Graphics and Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Systemd 243 RC1 Brings Its PStore Service, Zen2/RdRand Workaround & More

    Lennart Poettering has made available the first release candidate of the upcoming systemd 243 update. Systemd 243 is a big one in seeing more than 1,700 commits since the April release of systemd 242. 

  • Radeon RADV Vulkan Driver Adds Navi Wave32 Support For Compute Shaders

    Thanks to Valve's open-source driver developer Samuel Pitoiset, there is now experimental support for using Wave32 support on Navi graphics cards for compute shaders. 

    Navi/RDNA brings support for single-cycle issue Wave32 execution as an alternative to Wave64 for better efficiency. Just over a week ago the initial patches landed adding Wave32 support to RadeonSI for their OpenGL driver while now Samuel has tackled the initial implementation in the RADV driver. 

  • Mining Monero Cryptocurrency On The Open-Source POWER9 Raptor Blackbird

    Unlike my POWER8 server, the Blackbird cannot measure its own system power consumption (only the processor's), so I used a simple watt meter to take measurements. When off, with just the BMC on, the system took so little power my meter could not measure it. It kept showing 0 W, so presumably it's under a Watt. At idle, 55 W.

    [...]

    For each SMT mode, I tried six thread options. The SMT scaling is as expected, at SMT1 there are eight threads, and performance drops after; at SMT2 16 threads, and a corresponding drop after. The "more resources for each thread" effect is also slightly visible, with SMT1 having the highest result at eight mining threads.
    In SMT4, the efficiency scaling is quite nice, showing that a mere eight-core is not even close to the bottleneck here.

Server: 'Cloud', virtualisation and IBM/Red Hat

Filed under
Server
  • Cloud Native Applications in AWS supporting Hybrid Cloud – Part 1

    Let us talk first about what is cloud native and the benefits of SUSE Cloud Application Platform and AWS when building cloud native applications.

  • Cloud Native Applications in AWS supporting Hybrid Cloud – Part 2

    In my previous post , I wrote about using SUSE Cloud Application Platform on AWS for cloud native application delivery. In this follow-up, I’ll discuss two ways to get SUSE Cloud Application Platform installed on AWS and configure the service broker:

  • 10 Top Data Virtualization Tools

    With the continuing expansion of data mining by enterprises, it's no longer possible or advisable for an organization to keep all data in a single location or silo. Yet having disparate data analytics stores of both structured and unstructured data, as well as Big Data, can be complex and seemingly chaotic.

    Data virtualization is one increasingly common approach for dealing with the challenge of ever-expanding data. Data virtualization integrates data from disparate big data software and data warehouses - among other sources – without copying or moving the data. Most helpful, it provides users with a single virtual layer that spans multiple applications, formats, and physical locations, making data more useful and easier to manage.

  • Running MongoDB with OCS3 and using different types of AWS storage options (part 3)

    In the previous post I explained how to performance test MongoDB pods on Red Hat OpenShift with OpenShift Container Storage 3 volumes as the persistent storage layer and Yahoo! Cloud System Benchmark (YCSB) as the workload generator.

    The cluster I’ve used in the prior posts was based on the AWS EC2 m5 instance series and using EBS storage of type gp2. In this blog I will compare these results with a similar cluster that is based on the AWS EC2 i3 instance family that is using local attached storage (sometimes referred as "instance storage" or "local instance store").

  • OpenShift 4.1 Bare Metal Install Quickstart

    In this blog we will go over how to get you up and running with a Red Hat OpenShift 4.1 Bare Metal install on pre-existing infrastructure. Although this quickstart focuses on the bare metal installer, this can also be seen as a “manual” way to install OpenShift 4.1. Moreover, this is also applicable to installing to any platform which doesn’t have the ability to provide ignition pre-boot. For more information about using this generic approach to install on untested platforms, please see this knowledge base article.

Proprietary: Microsoft, Apple and Google

Filed under
Google
Microsoft
Mac
  • Netherlands warns government employees not to use Microsoft's online Office apps

    In one example, it was found that some 300,000 top tier Office users, with the ‘365 Pro Plus' package were being sent back to the US for storage - exactly the sort of behaviour that got Dutch backs up.

    In a wider sense, this is a small but public battle in a much larger war, with the EU still leaning heavily on Microsoft to put its post-GDPR house in order.

  • The iPhone now makes up less than half of Apple’s business

    Apple today reported its fiscal third quarter 2019 earnings, earning $53.8 billion in revenue and earnings per share of $2.18. That revenue is a 1 percent jump year over year. iPhone revenue was $25.99 billion compared to $29.47 billion a year ago. That means the iPhone represented under half of Apple’s revenue for the first time since 2012.

    The all-important services unit took in $11.46 billion in revenue. Wearables saw a big boost, likely thanks to Apple’s second-generation AirPods. CEO Tim Cook said that when the services and wearables / home / accessories divisions are combined, they approach the size of a Fortune 50 company. Revenue from Mac sales was $5.82 billion, and iPads were $5.023 billion, up from $4.634 billion last year at this time.

  • Apple Finds Life After the iPhone While Still Banking on the iPhone

    Combined, Apple’s two major independent product lines not attached to the iPhone -- Mac computers and iPads -- made up only 20% of revenue in the fiscal third quarter, despite gains from the period a year ago, the Cupertino, California-based company reported Tuesday. Apple’s also working on a mixed augmented and virtual reality headset for the coming years, but that, too, is likely to be iPhone-reliant.

  • Chrome 76 for Mac, Windows rolling out: Flash blocked by default, Incognito loophole closed, Settings tweak

    As a big HTML5 proponent for the past decade, Google encouraged sites to switch away from Flash for faster, safer, and more battery-efficient browsing. In late 2016 and early 2017, Chrome blocked background Flash elements and defaulted to HTML5, with users having to manually enable the Adobe plug-in on a site-by-site basis.

  • Google Chrome 76 Released for Linux, Windows, and Mac with 43 Security Fixes

    Google promoted today the Chrome 76 web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, Windows, and macOS.

    Google Chrome 76.0.3809.87 is now available as the latest stable version of the popular and cross-platform web browser from Google, based on the open source Chromium project. It contains various bug fixes and improvements, as well as no less than 43 security fixes for the latest vulnerabilities.

Devices: Orange Pi Zero, Avalue, RTL-SDR

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • Orange Pi Zero LTS SBC Launched for $8.49 and Up

    You can now buy Orange Pi Zero LTS Arm Linux SBC for $8.49 and up. The tiny board is ideal for headless applications with WiFI and Ethernet connectivity.

  • Toughened up embedded PC can run 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs

    Avalue’s rugged “EPS-CFS” computer runs Linux or Win 10 on Intel 8th or 9th Gen Coffee Lake CPUs up to an octa-core Core i7-9700TE, and supplies up to 32GB GB DDR4, 2x SATA bays, 2x GbE, 2x HDMI, and 4x USB 3.2 ports.

    Avalue announced an embedded computer with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake T-series or the new, but similarly 14nm-fabricated, 9th Gen Coffee Lake Refresh TE-series chips. The EPS-CFS computer, which is built around Avalue’s 3.5-inch ECM-CFS SBC, joins other 9th Gen-ready products including Kontron’s COMe-cWL6 (E2S) and Congatec’s Conga-TS370 COM Express modules.

  • RTL-SDR: Seven Years Later

    When I wrote that article in 2012, the RTL-SDR project and its community were still in their infancy. It took some real digging to find out which TV tuners based on the Realtek RTL2832U were supported, what adapters you needed to connect more capable antennas, and how to compile all the software necessary to get them listening outside of their advertised frequency range. It wasn’t exactly the most user-friendly experience, and when it was all said and done, you were left largely to your own devices. If you didn’t know how to create your own receivers in GNU Radio, there wasn’t a whole lot you could do other than eavesdrop on hams or tune into local FM broadcasts.

    Nearly a decade later, things have changed dramatically. The RTL-SDR hardware and software has itself improved enormously, but perhaps more importantly, the success of the project has kicked off something of a revolution in the software defined radio (SDR) world. Prior to 2012, SDRs were certainly not unobtainable, but they were considerably more expensive. Back then, the most comparable device on the market would have been the FUNcube dongle, a nearly $200 USD receiver that was actually designed for receiving data from CubeSats. Anything cheaper than that was likely to be a kit, and often operated within a narrower range of frequencies.

Drawing is a Promising ‘Microsoft Paint’ Alternative for Linux

Filed under
Software

Looking for a program like Microsoft Paint but for the Linux desktop? Check out the aptly named ‘Drawing‘, a new GTK app that ably fills the gap.

This simple image editor for Linux desktops is made in the mould of the Microsoft Paint. That mean it isn’t trying to out-do The GIMP, pitch itself as an alternative to Photoshop, or pick up where Pinta left off.

What Drawing can’t do is almost as important as what it can do; that’s to say, it’s a simply designed app designed for simple use-cases.

Think meme making, screenshot annotations, wobbly sketched moustaches on selfies, and that sort of thing.

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Security: Small Airplanes, Hutchins, Updates, Windows XP and WireGuard

Filed under
Security
  • US issues hacking security alert for small planes [iophk: as planes become networked, attacks will no longer require physical access, such a thing has happened in cars.]

    The cybersecurity firm, Rapid7, found that an attacker could potentially disrupt electronic messages transmitted across a small plane’s network, for example by attaching a small device to its wiring, that would affect aircraft systems.

    Engine readings, compass data, altitude and other readings “could all be manipulated to provide false measurements to the pilot,” according to the DHS alert.

  • Small Airplanes Can Be Hacked to Display False Data in Flight

    However, the [attack] requires physical access.

    [...]

    Rapid7 verified the findings by investigating two commercially available avionics systems. It determined that only "some level of physical access" to the aircraft's wiring was needed to pull of the hack, which could be delivered by attaching a small device to the plane's Controller Area Network (CAN) bus to send the false commands.

    The key problem is that the CAN bus is integrated into the plane's other components without any firewalls or authentication systems in place. This means untrusted connections over a USB adapter hooked up to the plane can send commands to its electronic systems.

  • No Jail Time for “WannaCry Hero” [iophk: the plea "bargain" still means he has become a convicted felon]

    Hutchins’ conviction means he will no longer be allowed to stay in or visit the United States, although Judge Stadtmeuller reportedly suggested Hutchins should seek a presidential pardon, which would enable him to return and work here.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (389-ds-base, curl, and kernel), Debian (libssh2), Fedora (kernel, kernel-headers, and oniguruma), openSUSE (chromium, openexr, thunderbird, and virtualbox), Oracle (389-ds-base, curl, httpd, kernel, and libssh2), Red Hat (nss and nspr and ruby:2.5), Scientific Linux (httpd and kernel), SUSE (java-1_8_0-openjdk, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, polkit, and python-requests), and Ubuntu (openjdk-8, openldap, and sox).

  • It's 2019, and one third of businesses still have active Windows XP deployments [Ed: The problem is that they use Windows (back doors in all versions), not that they use "XP". They should move corporate data to something secure like BSD and GNU/Linux.]

    Zero-day attacks were the second-most cited concern among IT decision makers, according to SpiceWorks, with 18% of respondents citing that as their primary concern. Insider data leaks were the most cited, at 27%, while attacks on IoT devices was third (17%), followed by supply-chain attacks (15%), DDoS attacks (15%), and cryptojacking (15%). Fewer than 20% of respondents indicated their business was "completely prepared" for common security threats.

    Considering the risks that accompany unsupported software generally, and the larger attack surface that results from an unsupported (or otherwise unpatched) operating system, there is a relative lack of urgency to migrate from Windows 7. Certainly, while paid support for volume licenses is a possibility for some, smaller organizations ineligible for volume licensing will be left out in the cold. To date, Microsoft has shown no signs of wavering in their intent to grant a reprieve to the remaining users of Windows 7. Without a major shift, or a reprieve from Redmond, the prospect of unpatched, internet-connected systems is fertile ground for botnet creation.

  • NordLynx: NordVPN Builds New Tech Around WireGuard

    Well known Panama-based VPN provider NordVPN has announced their NordLynx technology today that is based on the WireGuard protocol.

    NordLynx is the company's new "fast and secure" VPN solution built atop WireGuard. The company describes WireGuard as a "radical change" and "a breath of fresh air in the industry."

NetBSD 9.0 release process has started

Filed under
BSD

If you have been following source-changes, you may have noticed the creation of the netbsd-9 branch!

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Also: NetBSD 9.0 Prepping For Release With AArch64 Support, Kernel ASLR & Better NVMe Perf

More in Tux Machines

Try this Linux web browser dedicated solely to web applications

When I'm on the go, I need everything to work as efficiently as possible. And although you might be thinking, "But a web browser is as efficient as it gets, right?" That depends on what task you're doing and what site you're working with. This is especially so in the modern age of web applications and with constantly on-the-move staff. Instead of always having a full-blown, kitchen-sink-type web browser, sometimes we need something a bit more stripped-down, a tool that is geared toward one thing and one thing only—web applications. Read more

Graphics: GL, Libinput, NVIDIA, and AMD

  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Underwater

    I got a request recently to fix up the WebGL Aquarium demo. I’ve had this bookmarked for a while since it’s one of the only test cases for GL_EXT_multisampled_render_to_texture I’m aware of, at least when running Chrome in EGL mode. Naturally, I decided to do both at once since this would be yet another extension that no native desktop driver in Mesa currently supports.

  • xf86-input-libinput 1.2.0

    This release introduces support for touchpad gestures that will be available as part of X server 21.1. Additionally high-resolution scrolling data is now acquired from libinput if available and sent downstream to X server. The default scroll distance has been bumped to 120 in the process, but this should not affect correctly written clients.

  • xf86-input-libinput 1.2 Brings Touchpad Gestures, High Resolution Scrolling - Phoronix

    For those continuing to make use of the X.Org Server, xf86-input-libinput 1.2 is now available for integrating the latest functionality of libinput input handling library. Libinput 1.19 released last week with support for hold gesture types and high resolution wheel scrolling. The xf86-input-libinput 1.2 release for this X.Org DDX now supports touchpad gestures and high resolution scrolling data as well when pairing this driver with libinput 1.19. In the case of the hold gestures, it requires to be used in conjunction with the forthcoming X.Org Server 21.1 release.

  • NVIDIA Prepares The Linux Kernel For Future Laptops With EC-Driven Backlights - Phoronix

    NVIDIA is contributing a new open-source driver to the upstream Linux kernel for dealing with upcoming laptops where the backlight controls are handled by the device's embedded controller (EC). With Linux 5.16 later this year NVIDIA is ready with the "wmaa-backlight-wmi" driver for EC-based backlight controls for upcoming laptop/notebook computers.

  • AMD Continues CRIU Work To Checkpoint/Restore ROCm Compute Workloads - Phoronix

    Earlier this year AMD went public with prototyping CRIU support for Radeon GPUs around ROCm to be able to checkpoint/freeze running compute workloads and to then restore them at a later point. This CRIU focus is driven by their big accelerator needs and forthcoming supercomputers for migrating workloads particularly within containers. AMD continues working on CRIU support for GPUs and last week provided an update on the project.

today's howtos

  • Getting started with JBoss | Enable Sysadmin

    JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) is an enterprise-grade, open source platform to deploy highly transactional and scalable web applications. It includes everything you need to build, run, deploy, and manage enterprise-level Java applications in different environments—including on-premises, virtual environments, and private, public, and hybrid clouds. This article explains some of what I have learned during my time with JBoss EAP, its operating modes, installing it, and managing the JBoss service. I will also show how to build and deploy a sample web application archive (WAR) file so that you can learn alongside me.

  • How to scale GRUB menu on 4K displays

    Several weeks ago, I installed Kubuntu 20.04 on my IdeaPad Y50-70, a somewhat old but rather capable 15.6-inch laptop with a 4K screen resolution. Predictably, the device wasn't usable in its native screen mode, and I had to make everything bigger, scaling and all that. In the end, I managed to create an ergonomically comfortable setup, with two exceptions - the login menu, and the boot menu. The former gave me some grief, but I was able to get it sorted. With GRUB, there were more problems. One, the menu wouldn't show, even though I had a dual-boot configuration in place. Two, the menu was tiny, with the text barely readable. So I embarked on a journey of GRUB modifications, hence this tutorial. Let me show you how you can make the GRUB menu bigger on HD/UHD displays.

  • Use this Linux command-line tool to learn more about your NVMe drives | Opensource.com

    NVMe stands for Non-Volatile Memory Express, and it refers to how software and storage communicate across PCIe and other protocols, including TCP. It's an open specification led by a non-profit organization and defines several forms of solid-state storage. My laptop has an NVMe drive, as does my desktop. And they're fast. I love how quickly my computers boot and how quickly they're able to read and write data. There's no perceptible delay. It also didn't take long for me to get curious about the technology driving this ultra-fast storage, so I did a little investigation. I learned that NVMe drives consume less power while delivering much faster access to data compared to even SSD drives over SATA. That was interesting, but I wanted to know more about my particular NVMe drives, and I wanted to know how they compared with other drives. Could I securely erase the drive? How could I check its integrity? Those questions led me to an Internet search that yielded an open source project with a collection of tools to manage NVMe drives. It's called nvme-cli.

  • Delta Chat, Overview and Installation

    The email messenger, Delta Chat, is a Germany communication app which everyone can use and just works friends and family even without them using the same application. This article overviews it and give installation guide for Ubuntu and Android users. Let's chat!

  • How to install Node.js & NPM on Debian 11

    Node.js is an open-source, cross-platform runtime environment for developing server-side and networking applications built on Chrome's V8 JavaScript engine. It uses an event-driven, non-blocking I/O model that makes it lightweight and efficient. NPM(Node Package Manager) is the default package manager for Node.js. It comes installed when you install Node.js. You can do almost everything with it since it provides access to thousands of packages that can be downloaded and installed in your application's project directory through the command-line interface. In this article, we will learn what Nodejs is and how to install it on a Linux machine using a non-root user account.

  • How to Install pgAdmin 5 PostgreSQL Administration Tool on Debian 11

    pgAdmin is a free and open-source graphical administration tool for PostgreSQL which is easy to use. It supports PostgreSQL 9.6 and above, and it can be run on multiple operating systems, including Windows, macOS, and Linux.

  • Install Filebeat on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Filebeat is used to ship logs to logstash or Elastic search to filter and use them as per requirement. Whether you’re collecting from security devices, cloud, containers, hosts, or OT, Filebeat helps you keep the simple things simple by offering a lightweight way to forward and centralize logs and files. Filebeat consists of two main components: inputs and harvesters. These components work together to tail files and send event data to the output that you specify. An input is responsible for managing the harvesters and finding all sources to read from.

  • How to Install FreeRADIUS and Daloradius on Ubuntu 20.04 – VITUX

    RADIUS is a AAA (authentication, authorization, and accounting) protocol that helps in controlling network access. In other words, RADIUS protocol is used for connection management between the Network Access Server (NAS) and Authentication server. The connection between two ends(NAC-NAS or NAS-Authentication server) is initiated after a successful negotiation on the network layer by exchanging packets containing necessary information such as NAS identification, authentication port number etc. In simple words, it can be said that RADIUS provides authentication, authorization, and account information from an Authentication server to a device requesting access.

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