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July 2019

Programming/Development Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Continuous Integration/Continuous Development with FOSS Tools

    One of the hottest topics within the DevOps space is Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD). This attention has drawn lots of investment dollars, and a vast array of proprietary Software As A Service (SaaS) tools have been created in the CI/CD space, which traditionally has been dominated by free open-source software (FOSS) tools. Is FOSS still the right choice with the low cost of many of these SaaS options?

    It depends. In many cases, the cost of self-hosting these FOSS tools will be greater than the cost to use a non-FOSS SaaS option. However, even in today's cloud-centric and SaaS-saturated world, you may have good reasons to self-host FOSS. Whatever those reasons may be, just don't forget that "Free" isn't free when it comes to keeping a service running reliably 24/7/365. If you're looking at FOSS as a means to save money, make sure you account for those costs.

    Even with those costs accounted for, FOSS still delivers a lot of value, especially to small and medium-sized organizations that are taking their first steps into DevOps and CI/CD. Starting with a commercialized FOSS product is a great middle ground. It gives a smooth growth path into the more advanced proprietary features, allowing you to pay for those only once you need them. Often called Open Core, this approach isn't universally loved, but when applied well, it has allowed for a lot of value to be created for everyone involved.

  • Use Pandas Data Frame to display market data

    In the previous article, we have used the Blockchain API to display the Bitcoin vs world major currencies exchange rate in our application. In this article, we will use the Pandas Data Frame object to create a beautiful table for our displaying data. I have already introduced the Pandas Data Frame object before in the previous chapter, therefore, I won’t go through it again in this post. Let us go straight to the business.

  • Test and Code: 82: pytest - favorite features since 3.0 - Anthony Sottile

    Anthony Sottile is a pytest core contributor, as well as a maintainer and contributor to
    many other projects. In this episode, Anthony shares some of the super cool features of pytest that have been added since he started using it.

  • Intel's OpenCL "NEO" Linux Driver Stack Rolls Out The Experimental SYCL Support

    We've been eagerly watching Intel's open-source LLVM-based SYCL compiler support developed over the past number of months and today it finally premiered as an experimental feature in their modern OpenCL Linux driver package for its CPU run-time component.

    For Intel's modern OpenCL Linux driver stack known as their "NEO" OpenCL driver now there is this experimental SYCL support bundled into their CPU-based run-time.

  • Learn a little jq, awk and sed

    sed and awk should be on every system you run across; jq is non standard, but easy to install. It’s worth spending some time getting to know these tools. So next time you are processing a text file and need to extract just a bit of it, reach for sed and awk. Next time you get a hairy json file and you are peering at it, look at jq. I think you’ll be happy with the result.

Debian Progress/Work From Sylvain Beucler, Michael Prokop and Chris Lamb

Filed under
Debian
  • Sylvain Beucler: Debian LTS - July 2019

    Here is my transparent report for my work on the Debian Long Term Support (LTS) project, which extends the security support for past Debian releases, as a paid contributor.

    In July, the monthly sponsored hours were split evenly among contributors depending on their max availability - I declared max 30h and got 18.5h.

  • Michael Prokop: Some useful bits about Linux hardware support and patched Kernel packages

    Now that we identified the relevant change, what’s the easiest way to test this change? There’s an easy way how to build a custom Debian package, based on the official Debian kernel but including further patch(es), thanks to Ben Hutchings. Make sure to have a Debian system available (I was running this inside an amd64 system, building for amd64), with according deb-src entries in your apt’s sources.list and enough free disk space, then run...

  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in July 2019

    Here is my monthly update covering what I have been doing in the free software world during July 2019 (previous month)...

Digital signage platform Xibo launches as a snap

Filed under
Ubuntu

Xibo provides a comprehensive suite of digital signage products, with its Content Management System (CMS) at the heart of this experience-led offering. Xibo for Linux is completely free and natively built for the Xibo CMS, which can be installed on servers or combined with Xibo cloud hosting.

Snaps are containerised software packages designed to work across cloud, desktop, and IoT devices. They work natively on the most popular Linux distributions and feature automatic update and rollback functionality, enhanced security, and greater flexibility for developers.

Utilising snaps allows Xibo to offer a simple, dependency-free installation, as well as the potential for feature enhancements in future offerings, and it works across many Linux distributions. It can be accessed worldwide, and when combined with Xibo in the Cloud, customers can choose whether to host in the UK, Germany, Singapore, Australia or the USA to ensure their content is kept close to them.

Read more

15 Best Free Linux Physics Tools

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Physics is a natural science concerned with the study of matter and energy applying laws that govern natural phenomena. It encompasses the study of the universe from the largest galaxies to subatomic particles, covering mechanics, radiation, heat, electricity, sound, magnetism and the structure of atoms.

A good background of physics is essential in understanding our planet, our neighbouring planets, our solar system, and the universe. It offers explanations for every observed natural phenomenon. Physics is widely regarded as the most central and fundamental science and forms the basis of many other sciences including astronomy, chemistry, biology, oceanography, seismology, and zoology.

Physics is an incredibly stimulating science, challenging our imagination with quantum mechanics, electrodynamics, chaos theory, and electromagnetism. It has contributed to modern society with the development of lasers, computers, homeland security, power transmission, biomedicine and drug development, cancer therapy, medical imaging, light sources, and much more.

Science really prospers and advances when individuals share the results of their experiments with others in the scientific community. There is a certain logic that scientific software should therefore be released under an open source license. This article focuses on selecting the best open source software for physics and physics education. Hopefully there will be something for interest here for all budding physicists.

Here’s our rating for each of the physics tools.

Read more

Linux Mint vs Ubuntu Comparison

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu and Linux Mint for legal reasons do not distribute by default all the multimedia codecs that we would like. However, in Ubuntu using the terminal we can install the package ubuntu-restricted-extras where are the Flash plugin, Microsoft fonts, and other things.

In Linux Mint we have that package, but we also have a more specialized one called codecs-multimedia that we can install from the main menu of the distribution.

Conclusion

Ubuntu and Linux Mint are quite mature Linux distributions with clear development goals and lines. Both offer the opportunity to have a nice, stable system with a great capacity to manage programs.

In this post, we have explained the main differences between the two, however, internally there are still many more. It’s up to you to know which one you like best.

Read more

Ubuntu Touch Q&A 55

Filed under
Ubuntu

Some of the problems we have had with the new adaptations to UT are caused by apps that do not function properly with Mir. There are conflicts with work done earlier by Canonical. The approach we have taken now is that if it does not work as we want, we kill the app. iOS and Android also kill apps in similar situations, so this is pretty normal practice. It avoids problems that follow when apps don’t behave correctly. The inability to close apps while not in focus has now been fixed.

There needs to be a major refactoring in qtMir and Unity8. It general though, apps take a very complicated route when handled by Mir, so it is not easy to solve problems and the refresh needed will have to be big.

Nevertheless, with those two changes we are very close to the point where Edge channel can be merged into Development channel.

Read more

Also: UBports Is Working On Ubuntu Touch OTA-10

Krita 4.2.4

Filed under
KDE

We’re releasing Krita 4.2.4 today. The most important fixes are to the shortcut input system and the saving system. Krita 4.2.3 had a bug where a message window would often pop up complaining about a shortcut not being finished properly; this should no longer happen. Anna Medonosova has hardened the saving system even more, especially when closing Krita after initiating a save operation.

There are some more bug fixes coming soon, and we will release 4.2.5 with those fixes in about two weeks, after the coming Krita sprint.

Read more

Gaming: xrdesktop, Steam Play Proton, The Humble Crusader Kings II Bundle and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • xrdesktop, a new Valve-funded open source project to bring Linux desktops into VR

    Valve seem to be pushing Linux support even harder now, with the announcement of the open source xrdesktop project from Collabora.

    This new project, funded thanks to Valve, enables interactions with traditional desktop environments, such as GNOME and KDE in Virtual Reality. With xrdesktop, Linux window managers will be aware of VR and be able to use VR runtimes to render your desktop windows in a 3D space. It also gives you the ability to manipulate them with VR controllers, which sounds pretty fun.

  • Steam Play Proton 4.11 released, a pretty huge release pulling in D9VK and a replacement for esync

    Valve have announced the release of Steam Play Proton 4.11, this is a pretty exciting one and it's pretty huge overall.

    Firstly, it was re-based on top of Wine 4.11. So it brings thousands of improvements over, considering that's quite a version bump. Additionally, 154 patches from Proton were upstreamed directly to Wine!

    The next exciting bit is that Valve are now funding D9VK (and have been since June according to developer Joshua Ashton), along with shipping it in Proton as part of this update. This Vulkan-based Direct3D 9 renderer is still experimental, so it's not enabled by default as you need to use the "PROTON_USE_D9VK" setting.

  • The Humble Crusader Kings II Bundle seems like an amazing deal for strategy game fans

    Humble Bundle are back and they've provided a pretty good one this time, with the Humble Crusader Kings II Bundle. If you enjoy strategy games, this is a seriously good deal not to miss out on!

  • Valve's new "ACO" Mesa shader compiler for AMD GPUs now has vertex shader support

    For our third bit of Valve news today, they also recently announced that their Mesa shader compiler "ACO" had a bit of an upgrade recently as well.

  • Unity 2019.2 released with lots of new features, improvements and fixes

    Further pushing what game developers are able to make, Unity 2019.2 is now officially available with plenty of new features, improvements and bug fixes.

    [...]

    There's also various improvements to their OpenGL and Vulkan API implementations. For OpenGL, it can now use the SRP batcher. For Vulkan, it now supports all GPU formats for RenderTexture, multiple Vulkan crashes were solved, fixes to dynamic resolution when using Vulkan, multiple Vulkan XR fixes and so on. Curiously, Unity will now force NVIDIA drivers on Linux to turn off VSync.

  • Space colony sim "Oxygen Not Included" from Klei Entertainment has left Early Access

    Probably some of the finest work yet from Klei Entertainment, the space colony sim Oxygen Not Included has now left Early Access.

    [...]

    This isn't just Klei pushing out what was there as released, it comes along with a big update to the game too. There's a bunch of new buildings including an Ethanol Distiller, Airborne Critter Bait, Wood Burner, Duplicant Motion Sensor and more. Two new critters are included with the Pokeshell and Pip, five new plants, new animations, new types of asteroids to colonize, new foods, new biomes and…the list goes on. They've clearly put a huge amount of work into this release.

  • Waves 2: Notorious, an absolutely mad twin-stick shooter arrives on Linux

    As a follow-up to 2011's Waves, Waves 2: Notorious has arrived on Linux as part of the 0.73 Early Access update on Steam. Originally entering Early Access in late 2015 it has continued to see big updates and the developer, Rob Hale (aka Squid In A Box Ltd), is planning a full release in Q2 next year. Note: Key provided by the developer.

    So what is it? Waves 2: Notorious puts you in the shoes of a Hacker or "Runner", tasked with infiltrating computer networks in a cyberpunk-styled version of cyberspace. Here you must protect yourself against the attacks of the AI "Administrator", while uploading viruses and downloading corporate secrets in an attempt to build your notoriety.

  • Lovecraftian horror RPG "Stygian: Reign of the Old Ones" announced for release in September

    Cultic Games and 1C Entertainment have today announced the Lovecraftian horror RPG, Stygian: Reign of the Old Ones, will be releasing with Linux support on September 26th.

    [...]

  • Previously a Humble Original, A Short Hike: The Extra Mile has released with Linux support

    This newly updated and released game adds in Linux support as part of an expanded game overall. The developer said a bunch of ideas couldn't quite fit into the original release, so here we are. It includes new characters to meet, fishing, a better water shader, a new accessibility feature to change the pixel scaling and so on.

    [...]

    You can find A Short Hike: The Extra Mile on Steam and itch.io. Seems like a really sweet experience if you're after something a little more chilled-out.

More in Tux Machines

Videos: Getting Rid of Microsoft and Linux from Scratch

Kontron takes Raspberry Pi into Industry 4.0 with Codesys

“The integrated development environment Codesys for programmable logic controllers according to the IEC 61131-3 standards is hardware-independent software for application development in industrial automation,” according to Kontron. “Thanks to its open interfaces and security features, Codesys has distinguished itself as an industry 4.0 platform and facilitates data exchange between IIoT networks.” Prior to this, Codesys has been available for Kontron’s PiXtend – a similar product that takes a standard Pi rather than a Compute Module. Of this, the company said: Codesys V3 lets you memory-program controls. An integrated web visualisation tool is available for displaying your control elements, diagrams and graphics on your smartphone, tablet or PC.” Read more

Security: Windows, Microsoft Malware, GPS Bug, and Some Exaggeration/FUD

  • Sophisticated Spearphishing Campaign Targets Government Organizations, IGOs, and NGOs - blackMORE Ops

    The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are engaged in addressing a spearphishing campaign targeting government organizations, intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). A sophisticated cyber threat actor leveraged a compromised end-user account from Constant Contact, a legitimate email marketing software company, to spoof a U.S.-based government organization and distribute links to malicious URLs.[1] CISA and FBI have not determined that any individual accounts have been specifically targeted by this campaign.

  • Malicious NPM Packages Caught Running Cryptominer On Windows, Linux, macOS Devices [Ed: Lousy anti-journalist sites try to blame the victims for having received malware from Microsoft itself]

    Three JavaScript libraries uploaded to the official NPM package repository have been unmasked as crypto-mining malware, once again demonstrating how open-source software package repositories are becoming a lucrative target for executing an array of attacks on Windows, macOS, and Linux systems.

  • GPS Daemon (GPSD) Rollover Bug

    Critical Infrastructure (CI) owners and operators, and other users who obtain Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) from Global Positioning System (GPS) devices, should be aware of a GPS Daemon (GPSD) bug in GPSD versions 3.20 (released December 31, 2019) through 3.22 (released January 8, 2021).

  • New Linux kernel memory corruption bug causes full system compromise [Ed: This is "local privilege escalation", i.e. vastly less severe than all those back doors in Windows, but so-called 'security' firms aren't meant to talk about state-mandated holes]

    Researchers dubbed it a “straightforward Linux kernel locking bug” that they exploited against Debian Buster’s 4.19.0.13-amd64 kernel.

today's howtos

  • Inspect the capabilities of ELF binaries with this open source tool

    Capa is an open source project from Mandiant (a cybersecurity company). In the project's own words, capa detects capabilities in executable files. Although the primary target of Capa is unknown and possibly malicious executables, the examples in this article run Capa on day-to-day Linux utilities to see how the tool works. Given that most malware is Windows-based, earlier Capa versions only supported the PE file format, a dominant Windows executable format. However, starting with v3.0.0, support for ELF files has been added (thanks to Intezer).

  • What you need to know about Kubernetes NetworkPolicy | Opensource.com

    With a growing number of cloud-native applications going to production through Kubernetes adoption, security is an important checkpoint that you must consider early in the process. When designing a cloud-native application, it is very important to embed a security strategy up front. Failure to do so leads to lingering security issues that can cause project delays and ultimately cost you unnecessary stress and money. For years, people left security at the end—until their deployment was about to go into production. That practice causes delays on deliverables because each organization has security standards to adhere to, which are either bypassed or not followed with a lot of accepted risks to make the deliverables. Understanding Kubernetes NetworkPolicy can be daunting for people just starting to learn the ins and outs of Kubernetes implementation. But this is one of the fundamental requirements that you must learn before deploying an application to your Kubernetes cluster. When learning Kubernetes and cloud-native application patterns, make your slogan "Don't leave security behind!"

  • 3 tips for printing with Linux

    I have a confession to make. This may be an unpopular opinion. I actually enjoy reading documents on a piece of paper as opposed to digitally. When I want to try a new recipe, I print it out to follow it so I don't have to continually swipe my mobile device to keep up with the steps. I store all my favorite recipes in sheet protectors in a binder. I also like to print out coloring pages or activity sheets for my kids. There are a ton of options online or we create our own! Though I have a fond appreciation for printed documents, I have also had my fair share of printing nightmares. Paper jams, low ink, printer not found, the list of frustrating errors goes on and on. Thankfully, it is possible to print frustration-free on Linux. Below are three tutorials you need to get started printing on Linux. The first article walks through how to connect your printer to your Linux computer. Then, learn how to print from anywhere in your house using your home network. The last article teaches you how to print from your Linux terminal so you can live out all your productivity dreams. If you are in the market for a new printer, check out this article about choosing a printer for Linux.

  • 3 basic Linux user management commands every sysadmin should know [Ed: But those have nothing to do with Linux… they’re part of shadow-utils.]

    I like logical commands; commands that are simple, straightforward, and just make sense. When I delivered Linux sysadmin training, I found Linux user management commands to be easy to explain.

  • Strange Apache Reload Issue « etbe - Russell Coker

    I recently had to renew the SSL certificate for my web server, nothing exciting about that but Certbot created a new directory for the key because I had removed some domains (moved to a different web server). This normally isn’t a big deal, change the Apache configuration to the new file names and run the “reload” command. My monitoring system initially said that the SSL certificate wasn’t going to expire in the near future so it looked fine. Then an hour later my monitoring system told me that the certificate was about to expire, apparently the old certificate came back! I viewed my site with my web browser and the new certificate was being used, it seemed strange. Then I did more tests with gnutls-cli which revealed that exactly half the connections got the new certificate and half got the old one. Because my web server isn’t doing anything particularly demanding the mpm_event configuration only starts 2 servers, and even that may be excessive for what it does. So it seems that the Apache reload command had reloaded the configuration on one mpm_event server but not the other!

  • Featured Unixcop Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) on CentOS 8 Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) on CentOS 8

    Data Integration ensures that information is timely, accurate, and consistent across complex systems. Although it is still frequently referred as Extract-Transform-Load (ETL), data integration was initially considered as the architecture used for loading Enterprise Data Warehouse systems. Data integration now includes data movement, data synchronization, data quality, data management, and data services. Oracle Data Integrator s built on several components all working together around a centralized metadata repository. Also these components – graphical modules, runtime agents and web based interfaces – in conjunction with other advanced features make ODI a lightweight, state of the art data integration platform. With its superior performance and flexible architecture, Oracle Data Integrator can_be used in various types of projects such as Data Warehousing, SOA, Business Intelligence or Application Integration.

  • Oracle Weblogic 14c on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Modern business environment demands Web and e-commerce applications that accelerate your entry into new markets like a boom ! help you find new ways to reach and retain customers, and allow you to introduce new products and services quickly. To build and deploy these new solutions, you need a proven, reliable e-commerce platform that can connect and empower all types of users while integrating your corporate data. Oracle WebLogic Server is a unified and extensible platform for developing, deploying and running enterprise applications, such as Java, for on-premises and in the cloud. Hi Guys ! Today, we will discuss about Oracle WebLogic server. We have got through some intro & now will have a glimpse of some architectural overview of this Oracle Middle ware product, Then we will go the how to’s. Don’t get bored till then ! WebLogic Server operates in the middle tier of a multi tier (or n-tier) architecture. A multi tier architecture determines where the software components that make up a computing system are executed in relation to each other and to the hardware, network, and users. Choosing the best location for each software component lets you develop applications faster; eases deployment and administration; and provides greater control over performance, utilization, security, scalability, and reliability.

  • Store Passwords Securely with Hashicorp Vault on Ubuntu 20.04 – VITUX

    It is always not possible to remember all the secret keys, passphrases, and tokens. Sometimes managing and maintaining secrets might be challenging tasks. We may need to store such secrets somewhere which we can use when needed. Hashicorp Vault is a solution that can be used to store secrets. It protects all the secrets stored on it and keeps secured. In this article, we will learn how to install Hashicorp vault on ubuntu 20.04.