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July 2019

Ubuntu in the Largest Surveillance Host and 'Store' Experience

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Announces Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

    Canonical and AWS announced today the public availability of on-demand Amazon EC2 Hibernation support for the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS operating system on AWS (Amazon Web Services).

    As one can imagine, the Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation functionality lets users start up Amazon EC2 instances, configure them to their needs, hibernate them, and then launch them again whenever they want with all the running apps in the last state before they were put to sleep.

    With Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation there's no need to rebuild the memory footprint of your apps, and it also lets you maintain a fleet of pre-warmed Amazon EC2 instances that may increase your productivity without the need to modify any of your existing applications in the cloud.

  • Amazon EC2 On-Demand Hibernation for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS now available

    AWS and Canonical today announce the public release of Amazon EC2 Hibernation support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

    Amazon EC2 Hibernation gives you the ability to launch Amazon EC2 instances, set them up as desired, hibernate them, and then quickly bring them back to life when you need them. Applications pick up exactly where they left off instead of rebuilding their memory footprint. Using hibernate, you can maintain a fleet of pre-warmed instances that can get to a productive state faster, and you can do this without modifying your existing applications.

  • A shift to the Linux app store experience

    Linux software developers historically have faced a number of challenges including fragmentation, distribution complexity and a lack of metrics into the success of their applications. Once an application is built, the journey does not end there – for companies and individual developers creating apps, thought needs to be given to promoting their software for maximum visibility, usage and customer experience.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Tuesday

    Security updates have been issued by Fedora (cutter-re and radare2), Oracle (389-ds-base, httpd, kernel, libssh2, and qemu-kvm), Red Hat (389-ds-base, chromium-browser, curl, docker, httpd, keepalived, kernel, kernel-alt, kernel-rt, libssh2, perl, podman, procps-ng, qemu-kvm, qemu-kvm-ma, ruby, samba, and vim), Scientific Linux (389-ds-base, curl, libssh2, and qemu-kvm), SUSE (bzip2 and openexr), and Ubuntu (python-urllib3 and tmpreaper).

  • Equifax Settlement Won’t be Enough to Deter Future Breaches: The Law Must Catch Up

    Last week, news broke of a large financial settlement for the massive 2017 Equifax data breach affecting 147 million Americans. While the direct compensation to those harmed and the fines paid are important, it’s equally important to evaluate how much this result is likely to create strong incentives to increase data security for both Equifax and the other companies that are closely watching.

    We doubt it will do enough. Without stronger privacy legislation, the lawyers and regulators trying to respond to these data leaks are operating with one hand tied behind their back.

    In the meantime, EFF strongly urges everyone impacted by the calamitous Equifax breach to participate in the settlement claims process. Equifax must pay for the harm they have caused to everyone. And all too often, the fact that too few people make claims in these consumer privacy cases is used in the next case to argue that consumers just don’t care about privacy, making it even harder to force real security upgrades. If you do care about your privacy and want to make companies more responsible with your data, make your position known.

  • Capitol One Breach Sets Record

    Capitol One bank announced that a criminal hacker stole the personal information of 106 million people who had applied for credit, including credit scores, social security numbers, and bank account numbers. By some measures, it is the largest data breach of a US bank in history. The FBI arrested the alleged hacker and filed a complaint in federal court. Capitol One joins a long list of companies that have had data breaches in recent years. In testimony before the Senate and the House several years ago, EPIC warned Congress that US financial institutions were not doing to safeguard consumer data. EPIC has recently renewed calls for the creation of a US Data Protection Agency.

  • Capital One Gets In On The Data Breach Action, Coughs Up Info On 100 Million Customers To A Single Hacker

    That's a big "if" -- one that's certainly called into question by the swift apprehension of a suspect. Maybe this is all on the level. Even if it is, does it matter? Companies collecting massive amounts of data are still, on the whole, pretty cavalier about data security, even as breach after horrifying breach is announced.

    Given the data obtained, it almost seems like it would have been far less labor-intensive to just scour the web for a copy of the Equifax breach and download that instead. The Venn diagram of the sensitive data likely has a significant overlap.

    Then there's the press release by Capital One, which inadvertently shows how little it really cares what happens to customers' sensitive information.

Collabora Brings VR Support to Linux Desktop Environments, Sponsored by Valve

Filed under
Linux

Sponsored by Valve, the xrdesktop project is developed by Collabora and designed to integrate into existing desktop environments like KDE and GNOME, making them running in virtual reality (VR) runtimes. It does that by rendering windows in 3D space, allowing users to manipulate them with VR controllers and headsets.

"This integration of xrdesktop into the window managers enables mirroring existing windows into XR and to synthesize desktop input through XR actions. xrdesktop can be run as a dedicated scene application, but it also features an overlay mode, where desktop windows are overlaid over any other running VR application," explains Collabora's Lubosz Sarnecki.

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

Programming: Python, Bash and HTML

Filed under
Development
  • How to drop one or more columns in Pandas Dataframe

    In this tutorial, we will cover how to drop or remove one or multiple columns from pandas dataframe.

  • Dictionaries in Python

    Python provides a composite data type called a dictionary, which is similar to a list in that it is a collection of objects.

    Here’s what you’ll learn in this course: You’ll cover the basic characteristics of Python dictionaries and learn how to access and manage dictionary data. Once you’ve finished this course, you’ll have a good sense of when a dictionary is the appropriate data type to use and know how to use it.

  • How to trim string in bash

    Sometimes it requires to remove characters from the starting and end of the string data which is called trimming. There is a built-in function named trim() for trimming in many standard programming languages. Bash has no built-in function to trim string data. But many options are available in bash to remove unwanted characters from string data, such as parameter expansion, sed, awk, xargs, etc. How you can trim string in bash is shown in this tutorial by using different examples.

  • OpenCV Crash Course for Python Developers
  • Bash eval command
  • Find Length of String in Bash
  • Bash Parameter Expansion
  • HTML Text Snippet Extension

    I often need to quickly test a snippet of HTML, mostly to see how it interacts with our accessibility APIs.

    Instead of creating some throwaway HTML file each time, I find it easier to paste in the HTML in devtools, or even make a data URI.

Blender 2.80

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Software

Thanks to the new modern 3D viewport you will be able to display a scene optimized for the task you are performing. A new Workbench render engine was designed for getting work done in the viewport, supporting tasks like scene layout, modeling and sculpting. The engine also feature overlays, providing fine control over which utilities are visible on top of the render.

Overlays also work on top of Eevee and Cycles render previews, so you can edit and paint the scene with full shading.

Read more

Also: Blender 2.80 Officially Released With Its Revamped UI, Eevee PBR Renderer

Canonical Releases New Linux Kernel Live Patch for Ubuntu 18.04 and 16.04 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Security
Ubuntu

Coming hot on the heels of the last Linux kernel security updates released by Canonical last week for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases, this new kernel live patch is now available for users of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating systems who use the Canonical Livepatch Service to apply rebootless kernel updates.

It fixes five security issues, including a race condition (CVE-2019-11815), which could lead to a use-after-free, in Linux kernel's RDS (Reliable Datagram Sockets) protocol implementation that may allow a local attacker to crash the system or execute arbitrary code, as well as a flaw (CVE-2019-2054) affecting ARM CPUs, which lets local attackers to bypass seccomp restrictions.

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KDE Plasma 5.16.4 Desktop Environment Released with 18 Changes, Update Now

Filed under
KDE

KDE Plasma 5.16.4 is now available three weeks after the KDE Plasma 5.16.3 update as yet another bugfix release in an attempt to keep the KDE Plasma 5.16 desktop environment as stable and reliable as possible. KDE Plasma 5.16.4 is not as big in changes as previous maintenance releases as it only includes a total of 18 bug fixes and improvements.

"Today KDE releases a bugfix update to KDE Plasma 5, versioned 5.16.4. Plasma 5.16 was released in June with many feature refinements and new modules to complete the desktop experience. This release adds three week's worth of new translations and fixes from KDE's contributors. The bugfixes are typically small but important," reads today's announcement.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Linux's KVM Sees Patches For RISC-V Support

    In continuation of the article last week how the RISC-V Linux kernel support has been maturing and various missing gaps filled in, another feature just arrived in patch form: support for KVM virtualization.

    Western Digital while associated with hard drives has been working big on RISC-V and already contributed Linux patches in the past. One of their engineers is the one to send out the RISC-V KVM support on Monday.

  • Keynote Speakers Announced for the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe

    The Linux Foundation today announced the keynote speakers for its Open Source Summit Europe (OSSEU), the leading conference for open source developers, architects and other technologists and a hotbed for emerging technologies, and Embedded Linux Conference Europe. The event takes place October 28-30 in Lyon, France.

    Open source software and technologies are a leading indicator of where companies are investing resources for technology development. By bringing the latest open source projects and leading technologists together in one place, the event becomes a forum for defining and advancing technology development in the years ahead.

  • Full Circle Magazine: Full Circle Weekly News #141
  • Episode 76 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, the Pinebook Pro is now available for Pre-Orders and a Critical Security Bug reported for VLC but that was quickly debunked so we’ll talk about the details for that. In App News, we got a couple new apps to check out. A command-line cheatsheet app called Cheat.sh and a live video mixer tool called Nageru. We’ve got a lot of Distro News this week from Fedora, SUSE, Mageia and we also got news from ArcoLinux, Sparky and Slackel. Later in the show, we’ll take a look at the new version of Coreboot and some Linux Gaming News with RetroArch and a new Humble Bundle that gave me some interesting perspective regarding various bundles. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Joining Purism!

    Personal news time! Starting in August I’m going to be joining the team at Purism working on the design of PureOS and related software products, but what I’m very excited about is that I get to continue to work on GNOME design!

  • The Hidden Costs of Automated Thinking

    The growing pervasiveness of machine-learning models, and the fact that anyone can create one, promise to make this process of accounting difficult. But it’s vital. Taken in isolation, oracular answers can generate consistently helpful results. But these systems won’t stay in isolation: as A.I.s gather and ingest the world’s data, they’ll produce data of their own—much of which will be taken up by still other systems. Just as drugs with unknown mechanisms of action sometimes interact, so, too, will debt-laden algorithms.

  • Are We Really Making Much Progress? A Worrying Analysis of Recent Neural Recommendation Approaches

    [...] we report the results of a systematic analysis of algorithmic proposals for top-n recommendation tasks. Specifically, we considered 18 algorithms that were presented at top-level research conferences in the last years. Only 7 of them could be reproduced with reasonable effort. For these methods, it however turned out that 6 of them can often be outperformed with comparably simple heuristic methods, e.g., based on nearest-neighbor or graph-based techniques. The remaining one clearly outperformed the baselines but did not consistently outperform a well-tuned non-neural linear ranking method. [...]

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Open source mind mapping with Draw.io

There's something special about maps. I remember opening the front book cover of JRR Tolkien's The Hobbit when I was younger, staring at the hand-drawn map of Middle Earth, and feeling the wealth of possibility contained in the simple drawing. Aside from their obvious purpose of actually describing where things are in relation to other things, I think maps do a great job of expressing potential. You could step outside and take the road this way or that way, and if you do, just think of all the new and exciting things you'll be able to see. Read more

19 Absolute Simple Things About Linux Terminal Every Ubuntu User Should Know

Terminal often intimidates new users. However, once you get to know it, you gradually start liking it. Well, that happens with most Linux users. Even if you are using Ubuntu as a desktop system, you may have to enter the terminal at times. New users are often clueless about many things. Some knowledge of basic Linux commands always helps in such cases but this article is not about that. This article focuses on explaining small, basic and often ignored things about using the terminal. This should help new Ubuntu desktop users to know the terminal and use it with slightly more efficiency. Read more

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today's leftovers

  • Mesa's Classic Drivers Have Been Retired - Affecting ATI R100/R200 & More - Phoronix

    The day has finally come that Mesa's classic OpenGL drivers (non-Gallium3D) have been cleared out of the code-base as part of their modernization effort for mainline. After a half-year pending, the "Delete Mesa Classic" merge request was honored today in eliminating the Mesa "classic" OpenGL drivers from the code-base. The drivers will still be maintained in an "Amber" branch, but considering how little focus these drivers have been receiving by upstream Mesa developers currently, don't expect much (or, if any) real changes moving ahead.

  • Steam support for Chromebooks could surface this week

    After months and months and even more months of waiting, it appears that we may finally get our first look at native Steam gaming on Chrome OS in the very near future. Affectionately known as project ‘Borealis’, the containerized version of Steam has been in the works for nearly two years and it was initially thought that Google was targeting mid to late 2022 for a release. With Chrome OS 96 just rolling out and the next iteration of Google’s desktop operating system not due until January of 2022, it’s fairly clear that this target was missed but that’s okay. I’d rather see a fully baked product released than a buggy piece of software that sours users to Chrome OS. Anyway, in its early development, I presumed that ‘Borealis’, a.k.a. Steam on Chrome OS, would simply be an optimized version of the Steam application that would install and run inside the current Linux container. Over time, we learned that Google was actually creating an entirely new container designed specifically to house Borealis and that it should run independently from the Debian container currently available in Stable Chrome OS. This makes more sense as Google can retain control of the Borealis container and keep it neat and clean for running Steam. Presumably, users will never actually interact with the container like you can with the Linux terminal.

  • iXsystems Recognized in 11th Annual Best in Biz Awards for Most Innovative Product Line of the Year

    TrueNAS by iXsystems is the world’s most popular Open Source storage operating system and is the most efficient solution for managing and sharing data over a network. TrueNAS Open Storage provides unified storage for file, block, object, and application data – making it an exceptionally flexible storage platform for business. All TrueNAS editions -- CORE, Enterprise, and SCALE -- leverage the enterprise-grade OpenZFS file system to provide an all-inclusive data management solution that protects customer data with features like Copy-on-Write, Snapshots, Checksums, Scrubbing, and 2-Copy Metadata.