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August 2019

Announcing etcd 3.4

Filed under
Server
OSS

etcd v3.4 includes a number of performance improvements for large scale Kubernetes workloads.

In particular, etcd experienced performance issues with a large number of concurrent read transactions even when there is no write (e.g. “read-only range request ... took too long to execute”). Previously, the storage backend commit operation on pending writes blocks incoming read transactions, even when there was no pending write. Now, the commit does not block reads which improve long-running read transaction performance.

We further made backend read transactions fully concurrent. Previously, ongoing long-running read transactions block writes and upcoming reads. With this change, write throughput is increased by 70% and P99 write latency is reduced by 90% in the presence of long-running reads. We also ran Kubernetes 5000-node scalability test on GCE with this change and observed similar improvements. For example, in the very beginning of the test where there are a lot of long-running “LIST pods”, the P99 latency of “POST clusterrolebindings” is reduced by 97.4%. This non-blocking read transaction is now used for compaction, which, combined with the reduced compaction batch size, reduces the P99 server request latency during compaction.

More improvements have been made to lease storage. We enhanced lease expire/revoke performance by storing lease objects more efficiently, and made lease look-up operation non-blocking with current lease grant/revoke operation. And etcd v3.4 introduces lease checkpoint as an experimental feature to persist remaining time-to-live values through consensus. This ensures short-lived lease objects are not auto-renewed after leadership election. This also prevents lease object pile-up when the time-to-live value is relatively large (e.g. 1-hour TTL never expired in Kubernetes use case).

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Petty gripes about kernel versioning and tarballs

Filed under
Linux
Red Hat

Today in gripes that about 5 people including me will have: it's really difficult to find a unified way to get a tarball from something on kernel.org to the Fedora dist-git in a way that meets the Fedora packaging guidelines.

Let's start with my pettiest gripe: the lack of a trailing 0 on official releases. Official kernel releases are usually versioned like 5.1, 5.2. Note the lack of a trailing 0 there. Stable updates are 5.2.3, 5.2.3 etc. This would be okay except for if you look at the Makefile for stable releases, there's still a 0 in the SUBLEVEL filed where stable updates come from. "But Laura, there's macros to take care of that" yes, in the kernel itself. I'm working on going from the kernel to dist-git so this means I'm writing scripts which have to re-do this work and think about this when generating a version string. If I wanted to be really petty, I'd start a conversation about changing the kernel versioning completely. The 5.0 numbering means nothing. The bump from 4.x to 5.x was because the second number was getting to high. The numbers mean nothing at this point except they keep getting larger. I'd love to see the numbers correspond to a date since the kernel is basically on a time base release at this point anyway.

Fedora has packaging guidelines describing how packages should work. It's to the benefit of everyone to follow these guidelines. The guidelines for Source recommend using tarballs and give a few other suggestions for how to set Source0 appropriately.

The Fedora kernel generates 3 types of kernel releases: official releases (v5.2, v5.2.1), rc releases (v5.3-rc6), and snapshots that don't correspond to an official tag. Currently, the way we generate all these is starting with the base (e.g. 5.2) and then applying a patch on top of it (patch-5.3-rc6, patch-5.2.10). We do this by grabbing the individual tarballs and patches from kernel.org.

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'Abandon Ship' on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Gaming

Wine 4.15

Filed under
Software
  • Wine Announcement
    The Wine development release 4.15 is now available.
    
    What's new in this release (see below for details):
      - Initial implementation of the HTTP service.
      - Stack unwinding support on ARM64.
      - Better multi-monitor support on macOS.
      - RichEdit control optimizations.
      - Various bug fixes.
    
    
  • Wine 4.15 Brings Initial HTTP Service Implementation (HTTP.sys)

    Wine 4.15 is out for testing this US holiday weekend. With Wine 4.15 it brings an initial implementation of Windows' HTTP.sys as the HTTP protocol stack that is a kernel-mode driver that lists for HTTP requests and passes it onto Microsoft's IIS.

    An initial implementation of this HTTP.sys service is now in place as one of the major features to Wine 4.15. HTTP.sys has been the replacement to the Winsock API by IIS and is geared to provide better performance than the Windows Sockets API and other features. This big round of HTTP.sys work was led by Wine developer Zebediah Figura.

  • The Wine 4.15 development release is out now

    What's a Friday without a little Wine? Thankfully today we don't have to find out as the Wine 4.15 development release is now out.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Storj Labs advances decentralized cloud storage platform

    Open source cloud storage startup Storj Labs is set to bring its vision of decentralized cloud storage to enterprise users.

    The Storj Labs Tardigrade service uses blockchain technology and a distributed network of storage nodes, provided by people or organizations that are paid for providing storage capacity. The initial versions of the Storj Labs decentralized cloud storage platform were not focused on providing the controls and guarantees needed for commercial use, but that is changing with version 3 of the Storj Labs platform and the Tardigrade platform, which became available in beta on Aug. 22.

  • Open-source serverless framework wants to pave the way towards serverless 2.0

    According to Jonas Bonér, CTO at Lightbend, today’s current serverless movement focuses a lot on automation and infrastructure, but neglects requirements at the application layer. This is because data, streaming and event-driven stateful architectures can be challenging, he explained.

    “The next generation serverless platform and programming model will take a more holistic grip on the whole system, end-to-end, and allow general-purpose application development—e.g. microservices, fast data, streaming pipelines, AI/ML, etc. It will let us implement common use-cases such as: shopping carts, user sessions, transactions, ML model training serving, low-latency prediction and recommendation serving, anomaly detection, job scheduling, and much more,” Bonér told SD Times. “What we are missing is support for long-lived virtual stateful functions, a way to manage distributed—durable and ephemeral—state in a scalable and available fashion, ways to co-locate processing and data, and options for choosing the right consistency model for the job.”

  • Talking Digital Transformation With The New And Prior CEO

    Here is a situation that each and every IT manager and chief information officer has experienced and will continue to experience: Having a very long conversation with the president or chief executive officer of their company about how to engage in or continue with digital transformation and the application and database modernization that this entails. And sometimes, that conversation will happen as a new person takes the helm of the company.

    That’s precisely what we did this week, but with a twist or two. We are not an IT manager or CIO, but rather an observer in the boardrooms of IBM i shops around the world, and the current and prior CEOs that we were talking to not only had to do some digital transformation and modernization projects of their own, but more importantly they run a company that for more than three decades has been involved in helping other organizations make this transformation. Specifically, we talked to Daniel Crépeau, who has just been appointed president and CEO at Fresche Solutions, one of the largest IBM i business partners in the world, and Andy Kulakowski, one of the co-founders of the company and the leader of the management buyout of what was then called Fresche Legacy and what was also a much smaller company with a much narrower market.

  • Unix as a Second Language: The touch command
  • Fabiano Fidencio: GUADEC 2019

    I've just came back from GUADEC 2019, which happened in Thessaloniki (Greece), and it's time to a small report of what has been accomplished there.

    As most of you probably know although I'm not exactly a GNOME developer, I do a bunch of work which is either specifically to be consumed by GNOME Boxes (and other management applications will take advantage of the work) or GNOME Boxes can, at least, take advantage of.

    With that in mind, I've headed to GUADEC 2019 with basically two major things in mind:
    - Meet my Google Summer of Code student and plan what's going on for the future;
    - Join the GNOME Boxes' BoF and check whether we could have an agreement on how to default to UEFI whenever it's possible;

    What I didn't have in mind, though, was that I'd be able to meet people like Will Thompson (from Endless OS), Carl Richell (from System76), and Cassidy James (from Elementary OS). Talking to them in person was something amazing which allowed me to have conversations on how to have the work they do better present in GNOME Boxes (with regard to displaying updated entries, in case of Endless OS and Pop!_OS, or with regard to having their entries added, in case of Elementary OS).

Linux Foundation: Hyperledger and LF Edge

Filed under
OSS
  • Ethereum Poised to Be First Public Blockchain in Hyperledger Consortium

    Ethereum could become the first public blockchain on Hyperledger – if the open-source consortium’s technical steering committee approves a proposal to adopt the ConsenSys-backed Pantheon project.

    Pantheon is a suite of ethereum-based services built by PegaSys, a 50-strong engineering team at ConsenSys. The Pantheon ethereum client, built on Java, is used to develop enterprise applications with features like privacy and permissioning.

    The proposal was sent out in a Hyperledger mailing list email on Aug. 8, and if it is accepted, Pantheon will be renamed Hyperledger Besu (a Japanese term for base or foundation).

  • Ethereum Client Becomes First Public Blockchain on Hyperledger

    “We’ve always wanted to be a gateway for enterprises to public chains while also meeting the needs of private and permissioned networks,” Hartley told CoinDesk. “I think this is a good step in that process.”

    Now the Hyperledger staff will work with ConsenSys to transfer Pantheon’s GitHub repository to the consortium and set up email lists and chat channels connected to the project. In recent months, ConsenSys has also donated ConsenSys CAVA to the Apache Software Foundation, which is now being incubated as Apache Tuweni.

  • Linux Foundation Defines Edge Computing with New Glossary

    Edge Computing today is a somewhat nebulous concept with an associated set of equally hazy related technologies. The Linux Foundation's LF Edge project is all about Edge Computing and is seeking to help define Edge Computing and its' associated concepts with the second version of the Open Glossary of Edge Computing released on August 29.
    "As the diversity of LF Edge increases, we want frameworks in place that make it easy to talk about edge computing in consistent and less-biased ways," stated Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge, and IoT, at the Linux Foundation. "It’s imperative the community comes together to converge on a shared vocabulary, as it will play a substantial role in how our industry discusses and defines the next-generation internet."

Hardware With Linux: OrangeCrab, Nexcom’s and Arbor’s Devices

Filed under
Hardware
  • ULX3S Education Board is Powered by Lattice Semi ECP5 FPGA & ESP32 WiFi/BLE Module

    A few days ago, we covered the KiCAD designed OrangeCrab open-source hardware board powered by a Lattice Semi ECP5 FPGA, and compliant with Adafruit Feather form factor.

    It’s turned out there’s another Lattice Semi ECP5 FPGA board that’s also designed with KiCAD and open source hardware. Radiona ULX3S differs are it’s larger and exposes more I/Os since it was specifically designed to meet the meets of the digital logic course at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing (FER) of the University of Zagreb in Croatia.

  • Apollo Lake industrial computer is only 26mm tall

    Nexcom’s compact, rugged “NISE 51” industrial computer runs Linux or Windows on a dual-core Apollo Lake Celeron with a pair each of GbE, USB 3.0, USB 2.0, M.2, and RS232 plus RS422/485, DP, and mini-PCIe.

    Nexcom has announced an “affordable” and “cost effective” computer for smart factory and M2M applications that measures a trim 162 x 150 x 26mm. The rugged NISE 51 runs Linux 4.1 or Windows 10 IoT Enterprise on an up to 2.4GHz, dual-core Celeron N3550 from Intel’s Apollo Lake generation.

  • Coffee Lake signage player supports triple 4K displays

    Arbor’s fanless, rugged ”ELIT-1930” signage player runs Linux or Windows on an 8th Gen Coffee Lake-S CPU with up to 32GB DDR4, triple 4K displays, 2x GbE, 3x COM, 4x USB 3.1, and 3x M.2.

    Arbor Technology announced a new member of its ELIT series of digital signage systems equipped with Intel’s 8th Gen Coffee Lake S-series Core processors with 35W TDPs. The ELIT-1930 runs Linux 4.x or Windows 10 IoT on CPUs including the 6x core/12x thread Core i7-8700T clocked at 2.4GHz/4GHz. There’s also a hexa-core i5-8500T and quad-core i3-8100T, both of which are single threaded. The system has an Intel Q370 chipset and Intel UHD Graphics 630.

OSS and Security Leftovers

Filed under
OSS
Security
  • What Would it Take to Challenge DJI’s Dominance in the Drone Market?

    Monday, CNN reported that Ellen Lord, the U.S. Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, told reporters that the department was seeking investors to develop U.S. manufactured drones so that the military would not be reliant upon Chinese-manufactured DJI products. That may be somewhat misleading – DJI certainly has never claimed to go after the military market, and accusations about “sending data back to China” remain vague and unproven. It is true, however, that drone manufacturers globally have struggled to compete with DJI’s rapid development cycles and manufacturing efficiencies: and there may be an argument that more competition in the commercial market could help to expand use cases and broaden the scope of drone innovation.

    [...]

    Understanding the Concept of an Open Source Platform for Drones

    While adoption of the open source platform is growing rapidly, it’s still a confusing concept to many consumers or commercial drone pilots. The common comparison is between Apple and Android, with DJI as the iOS of the drone world. Auterion co-founder Kevin Sartori clarifies that the comparison isn’t entirely accurate: the drone industry is still in the very early stages of development towards its real potential.

    “Our high level assumption is that drones are still feature phones,” says Sartori. “We might not be at smart phone stage, we’re still talking about Nokia,” he explains. “Drones aren’t connected yet. There is no easy way to distribute apps. With Auterion, we are building the infrastructure that will allow the industry to get there.”

    How Open Source is Being Used Now – and Auterion’s Place in the Market

    PX4 and open source tools are now being used to make new and innovative hardware products fly: from offerings from Chinese manufacturer Yuneec to new U.S. drone manufacturer Impossible Aerospace, developing a long endurance battery powered aircraft. Open source is allowing new drone companies and customers to focus on specific problems, says Sartori, without having to reinvent a way to make the drone fly: “Companies don’t actually build the whole solution, they focus on their added value,” he says. “It’s a natural evolution of the industry, and it helps the industry accelerate.”

  • The 13 Best Open Source Network Monitoring Tools

    We at Solutions Review compiled a list of the best open source network performance monitoring tools currently on the market!

  • Platform9 Raises $25 Mn to Leverage Open-source Modern Technologies and Enhance Cloud-native Infrastructure

    Platform9, the in SaaS-managed hybrid cloud company, announced that raised $25 million in Series D funding, bringing the total amount raised by the company to $61.5 million. This round was led by NGP Capital, with participation from Mubadala Ventures and all existing investors (Redpoint Ventures, Menlo Ventures, Canvas Ventures, and HPE Pathfinder). Rohini Chakravarthy, Partner at NGP Capital, joins Platform9’s board of directors with this round of financing.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (dovecot, gettext, go, go-pie, libnghttp2, and pigeonhole), Debian (djvulibre, dovecot, and subversion), Fedora (sleuthkit and wireshark), openSUSE (containerd, docker, docker-runc, and qbittorrent), Oracle (pango), SUSE (kernel, nodejs10, and python-SQLAlchemy), and Ubuntu (apache2).

  • This Week In Security: VPN Gateways, Attacks In The Wild, VLC, And An IP Address Caper

    We'll start with more Black Hat/DEFCON news.

Highlights of YaST Development Sprint and OpenSUSE Tumbleweed News

Filed under
SUSE
  • Highlights of YaST Development Sprint 83

    The summer is almost gone but, looking back, it has been pretty productive from the YaST perspective. We have fixed a lot of bugs, introduced quite interesting features to the storage layer and the network module refactoring continues to progress (more or less) as planned.

    So it is time for another sprint report. During the last two weeks, we have been basically busy squashing bugs and trying to get the network module as feature-complete as possible. But, after all, we have had also some time to improve our infrastructure and organize for the future.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the weeks 2019/34 & 35

    The last two weeks have been average weeks when it comes to the number of snapshots and updates. We have released a total of 6 snapshots. From a user point of view, I think this is actually a pretty good pace. The 6 snapshots were 0815, 0820, 0822, 0823, 0824 and 0828.

More in Tux Machines

libinput 1.16.0

libinput 1.16.0 is now available.

No significant changes since the second RC, so here's slightly polished RC1
announcement text.

This has been a long cycle, mostly because there weren't any huge changes on
the main development branch and a lot of the minor annoyances have found
their way into the 1.15.x releases anyway.

libinput now monitors timestamps of the events vs the current time when
libinput_dispatch() is called by the compositor. Where the difference
*may* result in issues, a (rate-limited) warning is printed to the log.
So you may see messages popping up in the form of
  "event processing lagging behind by XYZms, your system is too slow"
This is a warning only and has no immediate effect. Previously we would only
notice (and warn about) this when it affected an internal timer. Note that
these warnings do not show an issue with libinput, it shows that the the
compositor is not calling libinput_dispatch() quick enough.

The wheel tilt axis source was deprecated. No device ever had the required
udev properties set so we should stop pretending we support this.

Touchpads now support the "flat" acceleration profile. The default remains
unchanged and this needs to be selected in the configuration interface. The
"flat" profile applies a constant factor to movement deltas (1.0 for the
default speed setting).

Events from lid or tablet-mode switches that are known to libinput as being
unreliable are now filtered and no longer passed to the caller.
This prevents callers from receiving those known-bogus events and having to
replicate the same heuristics to identify unreliable devices that libinput
employs internally.

A new "libinput analyze" debugging tool is the entry tool for analysing
various aspects of devices. Right now the only tool is
"libinput analyze per-slot-delta" which can be used to detect pointer jumps
in a libiput record output. This tool used to live elsewhere, it was moved
to libinput so that reporters can easier run this tool, reducing the load on
the maintainers.

The tools have seen a few minor improvements, e.g.
- "libinput record touchpad.yml" does the right thing, no explicit --output
  argument required
- libinput measure touchpad-pressure has been revamped to be a bit more
  obvious
- libinput measure touchpad-size has been added (as replacement for the
  touchpad-edge-detector tool)
- libinput measure fuzz has been fixed to work (again and) slightly more
  reliable

The libinput test suite has been fixed to avoid interference with the
currently running session. Previously it was virtually impossible to work
while the test suite is running - multiple windows would pop up, the screen
would blank regularly, etc.

And of course a collection of fixes, quirks and new bugs.

As usual, see the git shortlog for details.

Diego Abad A (1):
      FIX: typo on building documentation

Peter Hutterer (2):
      test: semi-fix the switch_suspend_with_touchpad test
      libinput 1.16.0

git tag: 1.16.0
Read more Also: >Libinput 1.16 Released - Ready To Warn You If Your System Is Too Slow

18 Frameworks, Libraries, and Projects for Building Medical Applications

Open-source is not just a license or a code-based that left free on an online repository, It's a complete concept which comes with several advantages. Moreover, the most advantage you can get from Open-source is beyond the open-code it's FREEDOM; freedom to use or re-shape it as you see fit within your project commercial or otherwise, and that depends on the license of course. You are free from the headache of license conflict legal problems but also from the dilemma of dealing with restrections and limitations which come with property licenses. You are free from the system lock-in schemes, furthermore, you own your data, and freedom to customize the software as your structure requires and workflow demands. The Community: The Open-source project gains a powerful community as they gain users, the community users vary between advanced users, end-users, developers and end-users on decision-making level. Many of the community users are providing quality inputs from their usage and customized use-case and workflow or test-runs, Furthermore, they always have something to add as new features, UI modification, different usability setup, and overall introducing new workflows and tools, and That's what makes the progress of the open-source different than non-free solutions. While, Good community means good support, The community is a good resource to hire advanced users, developers, and system experts. It also provides alternative options when hiring developers. Unlike non-free software which are not blessed with such communities and where the options there are limited, The rich open-source community provides rich questions and answers sets that contributed by users from all around the world. Higher education value for the in-house team The open-source concept itself provides educational value, I owe most of what I know to open-source communities.The access to the source code and open-channels communication with the core developers is the best educational value any developer can get. Read more

Android Leftovers

Python Programming