Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

September 2019

Linux 5.4-rc1

Filed under
Linux

I didn't really extend the merge window by a day here, but I gave
myself an extra day to merge my pending queue. Thus the Monday date
for the rc1 rather than the usual Sunday afternoon.

And it wasn't all _that_ big or painful a merge window, for some
reason I just didn't get to the end of the queue until fairly late in
the second week, and continued to get a few more pull requests even
then. Part of it was just other discussions too happening, so I didn't
do _just_ merges all the time. But part of it was just that I also
spent some of Sunday away from the computer, doing some welding
instead.

Anyway, what I'm saying is that the Monday rc1 isn't really a sign of
any real trouble or more issues than usual. More just random timing.

Size-wise, 5.4 looks to shape up very regular. It's almost exactly the
same size as 5.3 was at the same stage, both in commits and in lines
added (honestly in advertising: 5.3 had more lines removed mainly due
to some isdn removal). Nothing major stands out, the most notable may
be the long-pending lockdown patches that weren't all that big, but
that now finally aren't tied to just EFI secure boot, so you can test
them out other ways too.

Read more

Also: The 5.4-rc1 kernel is out

Linux 5.4-rc1 Kernel Steps Forward With Next-Gen GPU Bits, Arm Laptop Support & exFAT

Manjaro Linux makes two bold moves

Filed under
Linux

Manjaro has had one heck of a ride lately. Recently, the Arch-based Linux distribution went from being just that (an Arch-based Linux distribution) to a full-blown company: Manjaro GmbH & Co. KG. The move was to shift the distribution from being a hobby project to something that should (and will) be taken seriously.

In fact, Philip Müller said he'd been researching "ways to secure the project in its current form and how to allow for activities which can't be undertaken as a 'hobby project.'" What this boils down to is that the Manjaro developers could now focus on the desktop Linux distribution full time, all the while getting paid for their efforts.

Read more

Raspberry Pi OS Raspbian Improves Raspberry Pi 4 Support, Adds Many Improvements

Filed under
Linux

Raspbian 2019-09-26 images are now available to download and they include the rpi-eeprom tool, which will automatically update the SPI EEPROM on the new Raspberry Pi 4 computer to the latest stable version. Furthermore, it adds overscan support added for FKMS driver, and improves Bluetooth connection with audio devices by adding the latest changes to the Bluez ALSA interface.

Furthermore, the Audio Settings tool has been modified to integrate more closely with the Volume plugin, which now lets users switch audio input devices, as well as the audio output between two HDMI devices. Support for more audio devices has been added as well in Raspbian 2019-09-26 by implementing "plug" values in the ALSA configuration file (.asoundrc).

Read more

Android Leftovers

Filed under
Android

The Xeon vs. EPYC Performance With Intel's oneAPI Embree & OSPray Render Projects

With Intel seemingly ramping up work on their open-source OSPray portable ray-tracing engine now that they have pulled it under their oneAPI umbrella as part of a forthcoming rendering tool-kit, I figured it would be the latest interesting candidate for benchmarking of AMD EPYC 7742 vs. Intel Xeon Platinum 8280 performance. In addition, the Embree ray-tracing kernels are also being benchmarked as part of this performance comparison.

Intel's oneAPI is expected to see a beta release next quarter and among the libraries making up the oneAPI Rendering Toolkit will be OSPray and Embree. The OSPRay ray-tracing engine is geared for scientific visualizations and supports a wide range of features all while being open-source under the Apache 2.0 license. OSPray also builds off Embree itself as well as the Intel SPMD Program Compiler (ISPC). The SPMD Program Compiler is for Intel's C-derived language optimized for SIMD on their modern architectures.

Read more

Security in Linux 5.4

Filed under
Linux
Security

Security Updates

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Monday

    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (dovecot, kernel, and qemu-kvm), Debian (cimg, cups, e2fsprogs, exim4, file-roller, golang-1.11, httpie, and wpa), Fedora (curl, ghostscript, ibus, krb5, mod_md, and nbdkit), Mageia (chromium-browser-stable, libheif, and nghttp2), openSUSE (djvulibre, expat, libopenmpt, mosquitto, phpMyAdmin, and webkit2gtk3), Red Hat (nodejs:10), SUSE (gpg2), and Ubuntu (e2fsprogs and exim4).

  • Exim 4.92.3 security release

    Exim 4.92.3 has been released with a fix for CVE-2019-16928, a heap-based buffer overflow in string_vformat that could lead to remote code execution. "The currently known exploit uses a extraordinary long EHLO string to crash the Exim process that is receiving the message. While at this mode of operation Exim already dropped its privileges, other paths to reach the vulnerable code may exist."

  • pam-python: local root escalation (CVE-2019-16729)

    Last week the openSUSE Security Team spent some time to check and review the PAM module from the pam-python project. Main reason for that – to make sure that the source code of the project is secure enough and bug free of course. Badly implemented PAM modules may cause user authentication to always succeed or otherwise badly influence security.

Exaile Music Player Got Its First Release in 4 Years, And I Didn’t Even Notice!

Filed under
Software

It turns out that this long-forgotten music library-come-player quietly squeaked back into life in the summer with the release of Exaile 4.0.0.

Exaile, for those who don’t know about it, is a GTK-based music player that was (arguably) most popular during the “halcyon” days of omg! in 2009-2012, aka the era of apps like CoverGloobus, Docky, eMeSeNe, Songbird, et al.

But the player (like other great apps of its time) soon faded from earshot as the music player scene solidified around apps like Banshee and Clementine and music streaming services like Spotify, Pandora and Deezer.

Read more

Microsoft Loves Linux Needs More Work Argues Open Source Leader

Filed under
GNU
Microsoft

Microsoft has increasingly embraced Linux in recent years, enough for Redmond to run under the mantra, “Microsoft Loves Linux”. Of course, the reason for the sea change from hating open source to embracing it is simply good economic movement.

Despite its new-found love for Linux, one expert believes Microsoft has a long way to go to atone for past problems. Specifically, free-software leader Richard Stallman says Microsoft’s top execs previously targeted open source in the past.

Most famous of the Linux attacks was former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, who described the platform as a “cancer”. Former Windows chief Jim Allchin said the open source idea was both un-American and a killer of intellectual property.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Multi-touch Gestures in elementary OS 6

One of the most hotly requested features for years has been to have multi-touch gestures in elementary OS, and with 6.0 I’m excited to say that we will deliver. Like the dark style preference, delivering a great multi-touch experience is a little more complicated than it seems on the surface. There have been some 3rd party tools to detect touchpad gestures and then trigger actions after-the-fact, but it wasn’t until recently that we’ve had the technical ability to provide smooth, responsive animations that track 1:1 with your finger movement across a touchpad or touch screen. We’ve had the great pleasure of working with José Expósito, the author of Touchégg, on our window manager gestures. In elementary OS 6, we use Touchégg Daemon behind the scenes to capture input events and communicate them to Gala, our window manager. Read more Also: elementary OS 6 to get great looking multi-touch gestures

Watch Live TV on Linux With Hypnotix: A New IPTV Application Being Developed by Linux Mint Team

The rise of streaming services like Netflix made people speculate about the dim future of TV channels. While the newer generation might not watch TV anymore, TV channels are not out of fashion, yet. Many streaming services like Hulu and Hotstar include TV channels in their offering. TV channels are also utilizing live streaming to broadcast their content to viewers on the internet. Another way to watch live TV is by using IPTV. There are a number of TV channels available via IPTV so that viewers can use internet to watch the live broadcast. Some channels are available for free while some might require subscription. Read more

Best Linux distros for power users in 2020

The Linux power user is a celebrated breed, and one that does not simply burst fully-formed from the earth. All newbies must toil long and hard with their Linux installations before they can describe themselves as one. At the very least, the power user will have a great degree of skill concerning all things Linux, whether it's the kernel, Bash or package management systems – and they won’t be afraid to get their hands dirty in the name of configuring the system. Read more

Budgie 10.5.2 Desktop Environment Released with Support for the GNOME 3.38 Stack

More than a year in the works, Budgie 10.5.2 is here with a wide range of changes, starting with support for GNOME Project’s latest GNOME 3.38 stack. However, Budgie still supports the older GNOME 3.36 stack to make it easier for Linux OS maintainers to backport it to older operating systems. The biggest new feature in this release is the new desktop icons implementation called Budgie Desktop View. While an initial release, it already supports single (default) or double-click for launching items. However, future releases will bring drag and drop support, keyboard navigation, and GTK4 support. Read more