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October 2019

Next Pinebook Pro Pre-Order Window Opens Early November

Filed under
Linux

Linux laptop and general ARM computing enthusiasts alike will be able to pre-order the Pinebook Pro for $199 (excluding shipping costs) from November 6 direct from the Pine64 website.

But if you plan on being among them you’ll want to act fast as the first batch of Pinebook Pros sold out crazily fast — so fast that by the time I hit publish on an article about it, they were all gone!

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GIMP 2.10.14 Released

Filed under
GNU
Software

This is basically the first shot at the previously missing feature set, so expect more to land to GIMP at some point in the future. Making selection tools work outside the canvas sounds like a sensible next stop. Then maybe we can seriously talk about boundless canvas.

This new feature is closely related to out-of-canvas viewing and editing and was also contributed by Ell.

Now when you e.g. rotate a single-layer image, you can use this transform type to automatically expand the canvas to include all of rotated pixels when using the default Adjust clipping mode. The switch is right next to layer/path/selection toggle at the top of any transform tool’s settings.

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Also: GIMP 2.10.14 Released With Better HEIF Support, More Filters Ported To Using GEGL

i.MX8M and i.MX8M Mini SMARC modules debut with 3.5-inch carrier

Filed under
Linux

Ibase’s rugged “RM-N8M” SMARC module runs Linux on an i.MX8M with 3GB soldered LPDDR4 and up to 64GB eMMC. There’s also an upcoming “RM-N8MMI” SMARC that taps the i.MX8M Mini and a new 3.5-inch “RP-103-SMC” carrier.

Ibase announced an RM-N8M Series SMARC 2.0 form-factor module equipped with an NXP i.MX8M SoC. While poking around the Ibase website to see if the company had launched any previous SMARC modules, we found that indeed there is an i.MX6-based RM-F6 SMARC 1.0 module. We also saw a “preliminary” RM-N8MMI Series SMARC 2.0 module with an i.MX8M Mini that we cover farther below.

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Native GTK Dialogs in LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO

The LibreOffice UI was traditionally implemented with its own VCL toolkit which via theming emulated the host desktop toolkit.

Then we migrated the file format the dialogs were described in to the GtkBuilder file format. But still implemented with VCL widgetry, though with additional GTK-alike layout widgets.

Then migrated the translation format to gettext .mo files, which added plural form translation support we had lacked.

Then incrementally migrated the code driving the dialogs to a new API with two implementations, one for VCL widgetry and one for GTK.

Over the last few major releases the GTK version of LibreOffice has increasingly had true GTK dialogs and less VCL dialogs and in master, as of this week, there are now no direct uses of the VCL dialog APIs.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Rugged embedded trio run Linux on Whiskey Lake

    Vecow launched two compact, rugged embedded PCs with Intel's 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE. The Linux-ready SPC-5000 and -5100 offer 4x 10Gbps USB 3.1 Gen2 ports and SUMIT expansion with optional 10GbE modules, and the RES-3000 features IP67-protected M12 ports.

    Vecow announced a fanless, rugged SPC-5000 computer and almost identical, but wider-temp SPC-5100, equipped with Intel's 8th Gen Whiskey Lake-UE CPU. Both embedded computers target machine vision, in-vehicle computing, factory automation, ITS, intelligent control, and AIoT/Industry 4.0 applications.

    The SPC-5000/5100 systems appear to be based on Vecow's recently launched, 3.5-inch EMBC-3000 SBC. The EMBC-3000 also powers a larger, more feature-rich SPC-5200 computer that was announced at the same time in early September.

  • GStreamer & automated testing in Lyon

    Following three days at Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Collaborans are continuing their stay in the capital of France’s Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region to take part the annual GStreamer Conference, as well as the Automated Testing Summit.

    Our entire multimedia team will be attending the GStreamer Conference, which takes place at L'Embarcadère on October 31 & November 1. They'll be presenting no less than a dozen times during the conference, on topics including RTP jitter buffer timers, network streaming protocols and PipeWire in the automotive industry. Read below for details & links to each of their talks.

    Back at the Palais des congrès de Lyon where ELCE took place, Gustavo Padovan, Linux Core Technologies Lead, will be taking part in the Automated Testing Summit on October 31. KernelCI will undoubtedly be a hot topic and heavily discussed as it became a Linux Foundation project just a few days ago.

  • Top opensource Android apps

    Since my transition to Linux I have acquired a culture of open source software, a culture that is expanding with every day I spend in Linux. 

    Especially after having seen the importance of open source applications in fighting the monopoly of Big softwares companies such as Microsoft, Apple, Adobe ...

    It has expanded to include even the way I use my smartphone, where I have become inclined to use open source applications, because of my love for open source on the one hand, and on the other hand because of the thirst of commercial software to spy on my personal information as well as the aggressive bad ads that hinder the good use of softwares. 

  • GraphQL a cut above the REST, say query lang's fans: Airbnb, Knotel, others embrace the tech

    At the GraphQL Summit in San Francisco on Wednesday, Matt DeBergalis, co-founder and CTO at data plumbing biz Apollo GraphQL, urged companies to appoint a data graph champion to help ease the implementation of GraphQL, a query language for fetching data.

    It's not yet a given that organizations want to implement GraphQL. But at a gathering arranged by Apollo, which makes the de facto standard open-source client and the commercial Apollo GraphQL Platform, there's a certain incentive to imagine GraphQL everywhere.

    It's already halfway there, at least among the 472 companies attending the show – about 52 per cent of organizations represented are already using the technology in production. Some of the more recognizable names include Airbnb, Audi, Expedia, The New York Times, Medium, PayPal, and Priceline.

  • After Server Breach, NordVPN Has Strengthened Security Measures

    What do you do when you find out the company you were entrusting with your privacy was hacked? Panic? There may have been a lot of that going on when NordVPN admitted to a security breach of their server.

    The good news is that NordVPN is on top of it, and it has already strengthened security measures. But will they be able to trust NordVPN again?

  • Shadow tree encapsulation theory

    Types 3 through 5 do not have any kind of support and type 4 and 5 encapsulation would be hard to pull off due to Spectre. User agents typically use a weaker variant of type 4 for their internal controls, such as the video and input elements, that does not protect confidentiality.

    [...]

    Type 2 encapsulation gives component developers control over what remains encapsulated and what is exposed. You need to take all your users into account and expose the best possible public API for them. At the same time, it protects you from folks taking a dependency on the guts of the component. Aspects you might want to refactor or add functionality to over time. This is much harder with type 1 encapsulation as there will be APIs that can reach into the details of your component and if users do so you cannot refactor it without updating all the callers.

Programming: Python, Bash and More

Filed under
Development
  • Python 3.8 Adds Walrus Operator, Improves Developer Experience

    The new release of the popular programming language includes capabilities to help developers produce better code, but it might take a while for enterprise adoption.

  • 4 Python tools for getting started with astronomy

    NumFOCUS is a nonprofit charity that supports amazing open source toolkits for scientific computing and data science. As part of the effort to connect Opensource.com readers with the NumFOCUS community, we are republishing some of the most popular articles from our blog. To learn more about our mission and programs, please visit numfocus.org. If you're interested in participating in the NumFOCUS community in person, check out a local PyData event happening near you.

  • Bash completion in Zato commands

    This is a quick tip on how to quickly and easily enable Bash completion for Zato commands - each time you press Tab when typing a Zato command, its arguments and parameters will be auto-completed.

  • Configurama - Building SaaS #36

    In this episode, we turned our attention to handling settings and configuration. We discussed different techniques for handling settings, looked at available tools, and started integrating one of the tools into the project.

    The initial discussion in the stream focused on different ways of doing settings. I talked about what I view as a difference between configuration (mostly static stuff) and settings (dynamic parts of the app).

    I also discussed where to get settings from. We talked about the 12 Factor App style with environment variables, and secret management tools like HashiCorp Vault and AWS KMS. Ironically, I blanked out on AWS Secrets Manager as an option. Additionally, we considered the alternative of reading settings from a file instead of environment variables and the security implications of environment variables.

  • Site.js: now with auto server reload on source code changes

    Sorry, your browser doesn't support embedded videos. But that doesn’t mean you can’t watch it! You can download this video directly, and watch it with your favourite video player.

Red Hat: Kubernetes, RHEL Impact and Halloween Release

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Why you don't have to be afraid of Kubernetes

    It was fun to work at a large web property in the late 1990s and early 2000s. My experience takes me back to American Greetings Interactive, where on Valentine's Day, we had one of the top 10 sites on the internet (measured by web traffic). We delivered e-cards for AmericanGreetings.com, BlueMountain.com, and others, as well as providing e-cards for partners like MSN and AOL. Veterans of the organization fondly remember epic stories of doing great battle with other e-card sites like Hallmark. As an aside, I also ran large web properties for Holly Hobbie, Care Bears, and Strawberry Shortcake.

    I remember like it was yesterday the first time we had a real problem. Normally, we had about 200Mbps of traffic coming in our front doors (routers, firewalls, and load balancers). But, suddenly, out of nowhere, the Multi Router Traffic Grapher (MRTG) graphs spiked to 2Gbps in a few minutes. I was running around, scrambling like crazy. I understood our entire technology stack, from the routers, switches, firewalls, and load balancers, to the Linux/Apache web servers, to our Python stack (a meta version of FastCGI), and the Network File System (NFS) servers. I knew where all of the config files were, I had access to all of the admin interfaces, and I was a seasoned, battle-hardened sysadmin with years of experience troubleshooting complex problems.

    But, I couldn't figure out what was happening...

    Five minutes feels like an eternity when you are frantically typing commands across a thousand Linux servers. I knew the site was going to go down any second because it's fairly easy to overwhelm a thousand-node cluster when it's divided up and compartmentalized into smaller clusters.

  • The economic impact of Red Hat Enterprise Linux: How IT professionals benefit

    It’s not overstated to say that the IT landscape completely changed with the introduction of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, more than a decade and a half ago. For 2019, IDC estimated a global business revenue of $188 trillion. Of this, they estimate that at least 40% is touched by software, leaving the IT footprint to be an estimated $81 trillion. Yes, you read that right, $81 trillion. As all of this software forming the global business IT footprint has to run on an operating system, IDC estimates that over 50% is running on Linux, with Red Hat Enterprise Linux accounting for 25% of that.

    That’s a lot of big numbers but what does it all mean? It means that Red Hat Enterprise Linux has changed the experience of many IT professionals around the globe. In a software-centric world, ongoing we have seen higher demand in support and IT services which in turn further helps fuel the global IT ecosystem.

    When IDC asked IT organizations how Red Hat Enterprise Linux benefitted them, they discovered a 12% savings in IT staff productivity. This means that IT professionals spend less time managing servers, doing routine IT tasks, resolving support calls, deploying new business apps and upgrading mission-critical apps. But that’s not all.

  • The spooktacular tale of Red Hat's Halloween release

    In many stories and myths, naming is important. Knowing the proper name of something gives you power over it. Likewise, naming has been important for Red Hat Linux over the years.

    The Halloween release was actually a paid beta and not a 1.0. The Halloween release was dubbed Red Hat Software Linux 0.9, and started a tradition of having a codename for the release that lasted through the final Red Hat Linux release (9.0.93, "Severn"), and carried over to Fedora for many years.

    The tradition was to have a name for a release that was somewhat related to the previous release name. For example, the 1.0 release was "Mother's Day," and "Rembrandt" followed "Picasso," and "Colgate" followed it. (For the record, the best release name was a Fedora release, dubbed "Zod." Allowing many fun headlines playing off the Superman II villain.)

Linspire 8.5 Linux Operating System Released, Based on Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Linspire 8.5 "Swordfish 2" is a major release compared to the previous versions, bringing numerous updated components and various new features for a full-fledged Linux desktop experience. Just like its little brother Freespire 5.0, Linspire 8.5 is based on Ubuntu 18.04.3 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and uses the Linux 5.0 kernel.

Similar to Freespire 5.0, the goal for Linspire 8.5 was to address the bloatware complaints from the community and make the distribution slimmer by including only the "best of breed" applications. Of course, this means that, if users want to replace the default apps or install more, they can use the software center utility.

Read more

Direct: Linspire 8.5 Released

More in Tux Machines

5 collaboration tips for using an open source alternative to Google Docs

ONLYOFFICE Docs is highly flexible in how you can store documents. By default, you can use ONLYOFFICE Docs within an ONLYOFFICE Workspace. This provides a productivity solution for managing documents and projects. It's the clear way to use ONLYOFFICE Docs because it's included; when you install one, you get the other. However, the full ONLYOFFICE suite can be integrated with ownCloud, Nextcloud, and other popular sync and share platforms. Helpful connectors are available in your sharing platform's official app store or on GitHub. Read more

The Best RedHat-based Linux Distributions

Red Hat Enterprise Linux is a hugely popular enterprise-level operating system that supports a diverse range of open-source technologies such as Ansible automation, Hybrid Cloud, virtualization, and containerization. In this guide, we highlight some of the most popular and widely used Linux distributions based on Red Hat Enterprise Linux. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Day 2: Perl is dead. Long live Perl and Raku. – Raku Advent Calendar

    ‘Perl is dead’, is a meme that’s just plain wrong. Perl isn’t dead. It’s just dead to some programmers. Complicated regexes? Sigils? There’s more than one way to do it (TMTOWTDI)? Sometimes when programmers encounter Perl in the wild they react with fear. “WTF!?”, they cry! But fear needn’t be a Perl killer. If you take the time to see past Perl’s imperfections and walk the learning curve, there are rich rewards: Perl is an imperfect but pragmatic and expressive language that for 30+ years has helped programmers get the job done. When Larry Wall designed Raku he fixed most of Perl’s imperfections and doubled down on Perl’s DNA. Perl values pragmatism, expressivity, and whipupitude and Raku does too! Why stop at sigils ($@%) when you can have twice the fun with twigils ($!, %!, @! etc)? For some programmers, however, the mere sight of a twigil can induce fear. Like Perl, Raku’s expressive power is a double-edged sword – potentially stopping other programmers in their tracks. A Raku programmer’s, “DWIM” (do what I mean) can be another programmer’s “WAT!?”

  • Deriving Patterns of Fraud from the Enron Dataset

    Enron filed for bankruptcy on December 2, 2001. Arthur Anderson, one of the “Big Five” accounting firms, which audited the financial statements was dissolved as a result of the Enron scandal.

    The Enron email and financial datasets are big, messy treasure troves of information, which become much more useful once you know your way around them a bit. Enron’s complete data may be downloaded from this link here, and the refined pickle files may be downloaded from the following Github repository along with the complete code used in this article.

  • Qt Quick MultiEffect

    If you read the recent Qt Marketplace blog post, you may have noticed that something called Qt Quick MultiEffect has become available. This blog post gives more details on what Quick MultiEffect actually is and why you might want to consider using it in your Qt Quick projects. Let's start with a bit of background information. Qt Graphical Effects module contains a set of effects which can be used in Qt Quick user interfaces. These cover blur, shadow, mask, contrast etc. effects which can be easily applied into Quick items. When you need a single effect, these are great. But when you want to use multiple effects at the same time, performance is not optimal, because each effect renders into FBO texture which next effect then uses as its source. Because of this separation of effects, shaders also can't share calculations and textures. So multiple Qt Graphical Effects increase GPU and memory usage a bit more than desired.

  • Graylog provides end-user advancements in latest platform update

    Server Side Public License-Beginning with v4.0, Graylog Open Source will be licensed under the Server Side Public License (SSPL). First introduced by MongoDB, the SSPL license provides similar open source rights to GPL v3, and additionally extends those rights to cover cloud and SaaS offerings.

  • WordPress 5.6 Release Candidate 2 – WordPress.org

    WordPress 5.6 is slated for release on December 8, 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.6 yet, now is the time!

  • 4 talks from Bootlin at Live Embedded Event, December 3

    As we announced back in October, Bootlin has participated to the organization of a new online conference around embedded systems: Live Embedded Event, which will take place on December 3. The registration is totally free, and the event will propose 4 tracks throughout the day, covering a wide range of topics. We encourage you to register and participate to the event!

  • Librem 14 Status Update: EVT2 Sample Is Almost There – Purism

    We truly think of the Librem 14 as our dream laptop here at Purism, and because of that and because this is a brand new design compared to the Librem 13 we find ourselves nitpicking a bit more than usual as our design becomes a reality. As part of this nitpicking process we make EVT (Engineering Verification Test) samples which allow us not only to fine-tune our manufacturing process, it also allows us to physically examine the laptop. Using kill switches, using the keyboard, examining the print on the case and keyboard–all these and other tests help us refine things so that the final product is something we are proud of. In addition to the more cosmetic bugs we list below, it also helps us find larger bugs. For instance we discovered issues not just with the microphone but also an issue that limited the 2nd SO-DIMM slot to 16GB RAM. We needed to re-do the PCB to address both of these issues. We know a lot of people have been interested to see pictures of the actual Librem 14 instead of just renders. We have made the second round of EVT samples a few weeks ago and have finally gotten a chance to take some high-quality pictures to share. We are almost there! There are just a few more tweaks we want to make that will only add a few weeks to our shipping plan, but we think it’s important to get everything perfect. With the holidays this will likely mean shipping won’t start until the beginning of January.

  • DIY Pi KVM: An easy and cheap KVM over IP for Raspberry Pi

    Traditional IP-KVM systems may cost you hundreds of dollars. DIY Pi KVM over IP is a very simple and fully functional Raspberry Pi-based KVM over IP that you can make yourself. If you do not know what IP-KVM is, it stands for keyboard, video, and mouse. It allows you to connect to a computer or a server remotely. With this, you can fix problems such as configuring the BIOS or reinstalling the OS using a virtual CD-ROM or flash drive.

  • Sparky news 2020/11

    The 11th monthly Sparky project and donate report of 2020...

  • Utkarsh Gupta: FOSS Activites in November 2020 · utkarsh2102

    Here’s my (fourteenth) monthly update about the activities I’ve done in the F/L/OSS world. [...] This was my 23rd month of contributing to Debian. I became a DM in late March last year and a DD last Christmas! \o/ Apart from doing a bunch of activitites like attending KubeCon + RubyConf (blog to follow!), et al and simultaneously giving my undergrad exams, I did (relatively) more work than I had really anticipated!

  • FOSS Activities in November 2020

    Second month of doing these posts. In short not much has been happening the past weeks, but that would be a slight lie. I have sponsored rgacognes Trusted User application. The application was posted to the mailing list, and it’s currently being voted and decided by a weeks time. There has also been some discussion for years about bringing debug packages into Arch. This has largely been stalled but I brought it back to life again. Essentially the problem might be solved by utilizing the new debuginfod project, and we can later distribute the packages itself when we understand the new mirror requirements. There is currently a discussion on [arch-dev-public] about it. Along with the above, chugging along nicely with packages. Python has been rebuilt for the Python 3.9 release. This means there hasn’t been as many python package updates. Currently everything is in testing and we should see packages move to the stable repositories early next week. I simply haven’t been bothered going through the hoops of releasing package updates into stable and then deal with a rebuild for python 3.9 for testing.

  • A New Endeavour | LINUX Unplugged 382 | Jupiter Broadcasting

    A problem that just kept getting worse and worse. What it was, and why it led us to "check in" on EndeavourOS.

  • Top 10 Tools to Automate Linux Admin Tasks – Linux Hint

    If you are a Linux administrator, or you want to become one, there are certain tasks that can become repetitive and boring. In fact, back in the day, some tasks were so incredibly repetitive that it became very hard to keep track of all the servers; this is why automation tools were created to help with such tasks. These tools help you manage and administer different servers or systems at once, and some of them allow you to do a particular task with only a click or a command line. These tools mentioned below will definitely help you automate some of the tasks of a system administrator so that you can concentrate on other interesting concepts and tasks. Here are the top 10 Linux Admins to boost office productivity and ease of access. Click on the links to visit the homepage.

  • Google Anthos Gets Edgy on Bare Metal Servers - SDxCentral

    Google’s Anthos hybrid cloud platform now runs on bare metal servers. The move targets enterprise workloads running in on-premises data centers or edge locations, and the announcement preempts a ton of new products and capabilities that rival Amazon Web Services (AWS) will undoubtedly rollout at its annual re:Invent, which kicks off today. Anthos is Google’s fully managed, Kubernetes-based platform that allows users to manage their data and applications in an on-premises environment or across cloud platforms from rivals like AWS and Microsoft. Google announced the platform at its Cloud Next event in 2018, and made it generally available last year.

  • Mandriva Linux Chronicles: Good-bye, ZaReason!

    The best laptop I have ever owned (and still own, despite being purchased 6 years ago) is a ZaReason Strata. It is still working great, but I was one of these days fishing the market for Linux laptops, just in case. When I visited the ZaReason page several months ago this year, I saw that they had very few products. This year has been tough.

  • Oil and gas industry embraces open-source collaboration, encourages greener energy solutions [Ed: Greenwashing plus Openwashing]

    Krebbers and Liz Dennett (pictured, left), lead solutions architect at Amazon Web Services Inc., spoke with Rebecca Knight, host of theCUBE, SiliconANGLE Media’s livestreaming studio, during the AWS Executive Summit. They discussed how the Open Group OSDU Forum is reinventing the energy data platform. (* Disclosure below.)

Proprietary Software and DRM Travesty

  • Internet Explorer fails to make the cut, banished from Microsoft Teams for good

    As of today, the Microsoft Teams web app no longer supports Internet Explorer 11, as the Windows giant foretold in August. Microsoft says that customers using IE 11 with Teams can expect either degraded capabilities or the inability to connect at all. Redmond noted earlier this year that Teams usage had surged with so many people working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic. The end of Teams support for Internet Explorer is a prelude for a broader abandonment of Microsoft's legacy browser planned for August 17, 2021, when the other Microsoft 365 apps and services shut the door on the creaking software.

  • Salesforce is acquiring workplace chat app Slack for $27.7 billion

    Salesforce is paying $27.7 billion for Slack, according to the press release. “Under the terms of the agreement, Slack shareholders will receive $26.79 in cash and 0.0776 shares of Salesforce common stock for each Slack share, representing an enterprise value of approximately $27.7 billion based on the closing price of Salesforce’s common stock on November 30, 2020,” the announcement reads.

  • Dana Walden Reorganizes Disney TV Team; Karey Burke Moves to 20th as Craig Erwich Adds ABC Entertainment

    Disney Television entertainment chief Dana Walden is reshuffling her executive team as she consolidates the company’s programming operations. The moves will see Disney streamline its three distinct studios into two and integrate programming teams at ABC and Hulu.

    Karey Burke will move from her role as head of ABC Entertainment into a new position as president of studio 20th Television. Craig Erwich, longtime head of originals at Hulu, will add oversight of ABC Entertainment to his purview. Burke and Erwich will continue to report to Walden.

  • Quibi Is Officially Dead

    In October, Quibi announced that its board had decided to shut down the company, less than seven months after its April 6 debut. The startup, led by Katzenberg and CEO Meg Whitman, had promised subscribers a daily dose of “quick bite” originals, chopped into episodes of 10 minutes or less, featuring recognizable Hollywood talent.

  • ‘The Joe Rogan Experience’ Is Spotify’s Most Popular Podcast

    There’s a reason Spotify shelled out millions to bring Joe Rogan’s podcast exclusively to its platform. The Joe Rogan Experience was the most popular podcast on Spotify in 2020, the audio streamer revealed as part of its year-end Wrapped campaign.

    Spotify has been investing aggressively into podcasts in recent years, buying up audio-first studios and striking exclusive deals with top podcasters. In May, the company made its biggest bet yet on a podcasting personality when it inked a reported $100 million deal with Rogan to bring his show to its listeners.

    The often controversial Joe Rogan Experience hit Spotify on Sept. 1 and becomes exclusive to the platform in December. After making its debut on Spotify, it quickly rocketed to the top of the service’s podcast rankings and, in just three months, has become the most popular audio show of 2020 among its global listenership.