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January 2020

Linux Mint 20 and LMDE 4 Announced, Cinnamon 4.6 Gets Fractional Scaling

Filed under
Linux

Work on the Linux Mint 20 and Linux Mint Debian Edition (LMDE) 4 operating system releases, as well as the Cinnamon 4.6 desktop environment kicks off over at the Linux Mint headquarters.

Linux Mint project leader Clement Lefebvre revealed today in the monthly newsletter that the development cycle of the upcoming Linux Mint 20 and LMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) 4 has begun, and it starts with LMDE 4, which will be the first to be released later this year.

Packed with all the goodies from Linux Mint 19.3 “Tricia” and based on the latest Debian GNU/Linux 10 “Buster” operating system series, the Linux Mint Debian Edition 4 release will feature a better looking installer that now supports Btrfs submodules and /home directory encryption.

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Direct: Monthly News – January 2020

Raspberry Pi Is Getting Vulkan Support

Filed under
Linux

The Raspberry Pi Foundation announced today that it has started working on implementing support for the open-source Vulkan graphics API for their Raspberry Pi single-board computers.

While the latest Raspberry Pi 4 board is OpenGL ES 3.1 conformant, the company also wants to add support for the famous open-source Vulkan driver, which provides high-efficiency access to modern GPUs and better performance than the older OpenGL driver.

But don’t get too excited about this because the Raspberry Pi Foundation is just getting started on this Vulkan on Raspberry Pi thing, which will be big for gaming on the tiny boards.

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Lightmeter will soon help you tune up your email server

Filed under
GNU
OSS

If you refuse to be tied to a big-name email server, such as Gmail, Outlook, or Yahoo, then you probably run your own mail server. While that requires some technical savvy, you don't need to be a computer scientist to do it… until recently. Lately, 15% of all email messages fail to reach their destination. That's lousy. The new open-source delivery monitoring tool, Lightmeter, may be able to change those numbers for the better.

There are many reasons for this. One is that spam, powered by botnets such as Emotet, often overwhelms not just frustrated users but overwhelmed email servers as well. For those problems, server-based spam filtering programs, such as SpamTitian, MX GuardDog, or the good-old, do-it-yourself, open-source SpamAssassin are a must.

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Meet The Best Music App For Linux — And It Actually Looks Good, Too

Filed under
Linux

If you’re a Linux user and music junkie, there is no shortage of apps to choose from on your favorite Linux distribution. Amarok, Clementine and Rhythmbox? They’ve been around the block and have some name recognition — they’re perfectly capable music players — but they don’t exactly excel in the aesthetics department. It’s time to check out Lollypop, which is not only feature-rich but looks gorgeous on your desktop.

Right out of the gate, Lollypop distinguishes itself by simply look superb. The mandatory-in-2020 dark theme option is present, the UI is clean and easy to navigate, feature icons are simple but instantly recognizable, and the app puts a heavy emphasis on staying uncluttered and letting your music collection shine.

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Intro to the Linux command line

Filed under
Linux

If you’re new to Linux or have simply never bothered to explore the command line, you may not understand why so many Linux enthusiasts get excited typing commands when they’re sitting at a comfortable desktop with plenty of tools and apps available to them. In this post, we’ll take a quick dive to explore the wonders of the command line and see if maybe we can get you hooked.

First, to use the command line, you have to open up a command tool (also referred to as a “command prompt”). How to do this will depend on which version of Linux you’re running. On RedHat, for example, you might see an Activities tab at the top of your screen which will open a list of options and a small window for entering a command (like “cmd” which will open the window for you). On Ubuntu and some others, you might see a small terminal icon along the left-hand side of your screen. On many systems, you can open a command window by pressing the Ctrl+Alt+t keys at the same time.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • QuiteRSS 0.19.3 (29.01.2020)
  • PhotoFlare Open Source Image & Photo Editor

    If you’re looking for a free photo editor to use on your Linux or Windows system then do check out PhotoFlare.

    I hadn’t heard about PhotoFlare until very recently. But it only took one look at this image editor’s well-designed interface, ample feature set, and open-source friendly nature, to know that I had to try it out.

    In this post i’ll tell you more about PhotoFlare, its features, and show you how to install it on Ubuntu (or download it for Windows).

  • Sparky news 2020/01

    The 1st monthly report of 2020 of the Sparky project:

    • added to repos: ElectronPlayer, Stremio
    • added a new script to Sparky APTus Upgrade which lets you upgrade your OS in text mode via one command: sparky-upgrade
    • added Sparky configuration of Draco desktop to Sparky APTus-> Desktop mode; thanks to lami07
    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.5.0
    • new live/install media of Sparky 5.10 of the stable line released
    • the old repo address: sparkylinux.org/repo/ is no available any more; use repo.sparkylinux.org instead
    • Sparky Wiki has been moved to a subdomain: wiki.sparkylinux.org
    • Nemomen translate Sparky Wiki pages to Hungarian, thanks a lot
    • migration to a new vps is on the way, stay tuned.

  • Dremio CEO: Open Cloud Data Lake Levels on the Rise

    Cloud data warehouses are an improvement from the legacy on-premises versions, but they’re still just data warehouses, according to Tomer Shiran, co-founder and CEO of data lake engine company Dremio. Shiran says the cloud crusades will escalate this year, particularly in the realm of modern open cloud data lakes, as big data adoption continues to explode.

    The maturation of the technology stack, in addition to more machine learning frameworks entering the mainstream, has both accelerated cloud data lake adoption and sparked an evolution on two fronts: open cloud data lake storage and proprietary cloud data warehouses. “We believe the former will eclipse the latter,” Shiran said.

Audiocasts/Shows: Jupiter, Python and Linux Mint

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Devices: Raspberry Pi and Production Woes in China

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
  • Create a real-time object tracking camera with TensorFlow and Raspberry Pi

    Are you just getting started with machine/deep learning, TensorFlow, or Raspberry Pi?

    I created rpi-deep-pantilt as an interactive demo of object detection in the wild, and in this article, I'll show you how to reproduce the video below, which depicts a camera panning and tilting to track my movement across a room.

  • Free Raspberry Pi 4 cooling stand with The MagPi 90!

    In issue 88 of The MagPi, we discovered that Raspberry Pi 4 can be kept cooler than usual if placed on its side. This gave us an idea, and thanks to many Top People, it resulted in the small, simple, and very practical Raspberry Pi 4 stand that you will find on the cover of all physical copies of The MagPi 90.

  • Coronavirus Impact on Manufacturing and Shipping from China

    Unless you are living under a rock, you may have heard about the coronavirus originated in Wuhan, China. 

Security: Tor, Amazon, Avast, Spam and Windows

Filed under
Security
  • [tor-announce] New stable releases: Tor 0.4.1.8 and 0.4.2.6

    Source code for Tor 0.4.2.6 is now available from the usual place at https://www.torproject.org/download/tor/ . Packages should be available within the next several weeks, with a new Tor Browser by mid-February.

    Source code for Tor 0.4.1.8 is available from our distribution site, at https://dist.torproject.org/ .

  • Amazon Tells Ukraine Publication To Alter Its Article After It Links The Company To Ring's Problematic Ukraine Branch

    An extremely-problematic wing of an extremely-problematic company is back in the news. Ring's Ukraine division made headlines last fall when the presence of a "Head of Facial Recognition Tech" in the Ukraine office appeared to contradict Ring's claims it was not interested in adding facial recognition to its cameras.

  • Should Your Antivirus Software Be Spying On You?

    Back in August, Wladimir Palant, the creator behind Adblock Plus, wrote a blog post detailing how Avast Online Security and Avast Secure Browser were collecting and selling the browsing data of the Czech company's 400 million users. In response, both Opera and Mozilla pulled Avast extensions from their respective add on markets, forcing Avast CEO Ondrej Vlcek to go on a PR tour last month to downplay the issue.

  • SEO Spam Dominated Website Infections in 2019: Report

    Last year, SEO spam was the most frequently observed threat on compromised websites, according to a new report from GoDaddy-owned web security company Sucuri.

  • [Attackers] were paid ransom after attack on Canadian insurance firm, court documents reveal [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The unnamed firm had itself purchased coverage in case of a cyberattack. The company's U.K.-based reinsurer paid $950,000 US to unlock the hijacked files and is now fighting to get the money back from criminals, according to court documents stemming from a hearing held in private.

    "A [cracker] managed to infiltrate and bypass the firewall of [the Canadian company] and installed malware called BitPaymer," reads a Dec. 13 ruling from England's High Court in London. The document was published Jan. 17 and the case was first reported by the New Money Review.

Graphics: Mir/Wayland, NVIDIA and RADV

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • UBports' Unity 8 Has Working Wayland Support

    UBports has managed to upgrade their Mir support so Unity 8 can ride off the modern Mir implementation that provides Wayland support. In turn this means Unity 8 (and Ubuntu Touch) can run Wayland applications. There are also other benefits like now being able to run Unity 8 off the upstream Mesa graphics drivers without needing any Mir patches as was formerly the case. This also opens up Unity 8 to running nicely on more Linux distributions.

  • NVIDIA Retiring Their Pre-Fermi "340 Series" Legacy Linux Graphics Driver

    NVIDIA has sent out word that they no longer plan to issue anymore driver updates for their 340 series Linux legacy branch.

    This Linux 340 legacy driver series has provided extended support for the G8x, G9x, and GT2xx GPUs. Or in other words, the GeForce 8 series through GeForce 200 series. Moving forward though they will still be maintaining the NVIDIA 390 driver series that is their legacy driver for the Fermi GPUs.

  • NVIDIA end updates to the 340 series legacy driver for Linux

    If you have an older NVIDIA GPU, chances are you've been using the 340 legacy series. Well, NVIDIA have said that it's no longer getting updates. This does not affect any of their modern GPUs, just to be clear on that point.

    The 340 legacy series is the newest driver that supports NVIDIA GPUs from the GeForce 8 Series from 2006 up to the GeForce 3xx series (rebrands of the GeForce 200 series) from 2009. We're talking GPUs that can be well over ten years old, so it's only natural their support had to end at some point. NVIDIA did recently give it one last update, with the 340.108 released back in December 2019 which boosted compatibility with newer Linux Kernels so hopefully if you're still on it you will be good for a little while.

  • RADV Re-Enables NGG Geometry Shader Support

    On top of the last minute Radeon Vulkan "RADV" improvements landing on Wednesday for Mesa 20.0, another big ticket item landed... Well, re-enabled.

    Back in July shortly after the Radeon RX 5700 series unveil, RADV added NGG geometry shader support for Navi/GFX10. NGG is the Next-Gen Geometry engines found with Navi but as shown by the RADV driver work and RadeonSI OpenGL driver changes, it can be difficult/buggy to target.

More in Tux Machines

Free Software and More

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 15 October 2021

    Happy Friday, everyone. The Apache community has had another great week.

  • The Intelligent Edge – Coming Soon to Arm DevSummit 2021 [Ed: What a ridiculous coredump of mindless buzzwords by SUSE]

    For those of us not keeping score, we’re at the cusp of a technology shockwave that will fundamentally change the way we live, work, and interact with each other. Some call it the fourth industrial revolution (I4). While the third industrial revolution was all about process and product automation, the fourth industrial revolution (from an IT perspective) will center on the fusion of IT and OT.

  • Five of Monday's 'All Things Open' Presentations We Wouldn't Miss - FOSS Force

    If you couldn’t make it to Raleigh, North Carolina to attend this year’s All Things Open, you’re in luck. You can go to the conference’s web site and register for the free online version of the event, which will include live streaming of all presentations happening at the event (including all keynotes), as well as a large number of prerecorded presentations that were put together specifically for the online audience. That’s how we at FOSS Force are planning on attending this year, although downtown Raleigh is only a couple of hours away by car.

  • Community Member Monday: Hlompho Mota

    I am a native of Lesotho, and a dreamer and a person who aspires to make changes. Currently I’m working in a business that serves other businesses in Lesotho to get recognition in the market, and generally grow to become more self-reliant. Other than my business, I do try and dabble in technology and try to understand how it works – and get a sense on how it can be relevant in the area of life that I live in at this moment. But besides that, I consider myself as lifelong learner and I hope that the learning will continue for the rest of my life. Currently, I’m a self-taught developer trying to participate in as many open-source projects as possible, with the hope of bringing much-needed development to my part of the world.

Programming Leftovers

  • Use KPNG to Write Specialized kube-proxiers

    The post will show you how to create a specialized service kube-proxy style network proxier using Kubernetes Proxy NG kpng without interfering with the existing kube-proxy. The kpng project aims at renewing the the default Kubernetes Service implementation, the "kube-proxy". An important feature of kpng is that it can be used as a library to create proxiers outside K8s. While this is useful for CNI-plugins that replaces the kube-proxy it also opens the possibility for anyone to create a proxier for a special purpose.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: dang 0.0.14: Several Updates

    A new release of the dang package arrived at CRAN a couple of hours ago, exactly eight months after the previous release. The dang package regroups a few functions of mine that had no other home as for example lsos() from a StackOverflow question from 2009 (!!), the overbought/oversold price band plotter from an older blog post, the market monitor from the last release as well the checkCRANStatus() function recently tweeted about by Tim Taylor. This release regroups a few small edits to several functions, adds a sample function for character encoding reading and conversion using a library already used by R (hence “look Ma, no new depends”), adds a weekday helper, and a sample usage (computing rolling min/max values) of a new simple vector class added to tidyCpp (and the function and class need to get another blog post or study …), and an experimental git sha1sum and date marker (as I am not the fan of autogenerated binaries from repos as opposed to marked released meaning: we may see different binary release with the same version number).

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.42 Learning With

    Daniel Sockwell was inspired by a blog post a few weeks ago about a bouncing balls demo. The result is a new framework for learning Raku, but this time with some nice graphics: Learn Raku With: HTML Balls. Apart from the technical points, it’s also a great way (for people without much programming experience) to get involved with Raku while creating graphics and animations, rather than textual output. Check it out!

  • Russ Allbery: rra-c-util 10.0

    It's been a while since I pushed out a release of my collection of utility libraries and test suite programs, so I've accumulated quite a lot of chanages. Here's a summary; for more, see the NEWS file.

  • 1.56.0 pre-release testing | Inside Rust Blog

    The 1.56.0 pre-release is ready for testing. The release is scheduled for this Thursday, October 21th. Release notes can be found here.

  • Apple Announces The M1 Pro / M1 Max, Asahi Linux Starts Eyeing Their Bring-Up

    Apple today announced the M1 Pro and M1 Max as their most powerful SoCs ever built by the company. The new chips feature up to a 10-core processor, 32-core GPU, and up to 64GB of unified memory. While the Apple M1 was already well regarded for its speed, the M1 Pro and M1 Max are said to deliver up to 70% faster CPU performance than last year's M1. Meanwhile the GPU within the M1 Pro is up to 2x faster than the M1 while the M1 Max's GPU is said to be 4x faster.

Mozilla Firefox: Spyware, Password Loggers, and Performance Monitoring

  • This Week in Glean: Designing a telemetry collection with Glean

    (“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean.) All “This Week in Glean” blog posts are listed in the TWiG index). Whenever I get a chance to write about Glean, I am usually writing about some aspects of working on Glean. This time around I’m going to turn that on its head by sharing my experience working with Glean as a consumer with metrics to collect, specifically in regards to designing a Nimbus health metrics collection. This post is about sharing what I learned from the experience and what I found to be the most important considerations when designing a telemetry collection. I’ve been helping develop Nimbus, Mozilla’s new experimentation platform, for a while now. It is one of many cross-platform tools written in Rust and it exists as part of the Mozilla Application Services collection of components. With Nimbus being used in more and more products we have a need to monitor its “health”, or how well it is performing in the wild. I took on this task of determining what we would need to measure and designing the telemetry and visualizations because I was interested in experiencing Glean from a consumer’s perspective.

  • Firefox Add-on Reviews: How to choose the right password manager browser extension

    All good password managers should, of course, effectively secure passwords; and they all basically do the same thing—you create a single, easy-to-remember master password to access your labyrinth of complex logins. Password managers not only spare you the hassle of remembering a maze of logins; they can also offer suggestions to help make your passwords even stronger. Fortunately there’s no shortage of capable password protectors out there. But with so many options, how to choose the one that’ll work best for you? Here are some of our favorite password managers. They all offer excellent password protection, but with distinct areas of strength.

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (September 2021)

    In September there were 174 alerts generated, resulting in 23 regression bugs being filed on average 6.4 days after the regressing change landed. Welcome to the September 2021 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 25 October 1300 UTC

    Please join us at the next regular Open NeuroFedora team meeting on Monday 25 October at 1300UTC in #fedora-neuro on IRC (Libera.chat). The meeting is a public meeting, and open for everyone to attend.

  • Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending October 16 - RTInsights

    In this week’s real-time analytics news: Red Hat announced updates in its portfolio of tools and programs for building applications on Red Hat OpenShift, and more. Keeping pace with news and developments in the real-time analytics market can be a daunting task. We want to help by providing a summary of some of the items our staff came across each week. Here are some of the news items from this week: Red Hat announced a series of updates in its portfolio of developer tools and programs for developers building applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The updates were to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift GitOps, and the Red Hat build of Quarkus. Additionally, Red Hat expanded the roster of training resources available on Kube By Example.

  • What I learned about Kubernetes and Knative Serverless

    If you happened to miss this year’s Kubernetes Summer Camp, there’s some good news! The sessions were recorded and are available for on-demand viewing. Along with those, you’ll also get access to a variety of downloadable content, including a free O’Reilly e-book.

  • Awards roll call: August to October 2021 [Ed: Those accolades and fake rewards/awards can easily be bought; they let you game the system for money]

    From workplace accolades to product wins, we are proud to be able to highlight some aspects of our company and the recognition they’ve received in the past few months. We recently published our DEI Statement, which declares our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion—not just for our associates, but for our partners, customers and open source contributors. Our culture is rooted in transparency, collaboration, and inclusion—open source principles that continue to drive our company forward. We see the following awards as a recognition of our open source-driven innovation, where the best ideas can come from anywhere and anyone.