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January 2020

Sony Now "Officially" Maintaining The Linux PlayStation Input Driver, But Leads To Interesting Problem

Filed under
Linux
Gaming

It turns out Sony is now maintaining the mainline Linux kernel's hid-sony input driver in an "official capacity now across various devices." This hid-sony driver is what traditionally has supported the various PlayStation controllers and other input devices for their hardware. But their newfound "official" support for this open-source input driver could lead to interesting predicaments.

Sent out this week by an independent Linux user was a patch for supporting Gasia controllers with the HID Sony driver. These controllers made by Gasia Co are USB-based controllers aiming for compatibility with the PlayStation 3 controller. These Gasia controllers are similar to "knockoff controllers" we've seen from other vendors for the PlayStation and other game consoles like the Xbox in that often times they even use the same device IDs and aim to mirror the hardware/software behavior all the same.

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KDE: Calamares, Season of KDE (Calligra Suite) and Paul Adams/Christelle Zouein on Community Analytics

Filed under
KDE
  • conf.kde.in and Calamares

    I spent a week in Delhi on a trip to be part of conf.kde.in. One of the talks I gave had a line in it Translation is Accessibility.

    I would probably add accessibility is a right, although that would be hypocritical of me, given that Calamares’s accessibility isn’t all that good (part of that is down to Qt and a languishing patch for making Qt-applications-as-root accessible). There’s some open issues on that front, and I hope that we’re going to find some progress in the next few months.

    In any case, one of the talks was on the transition of the Janayugom newspaper to Free Software – Scribus and KDE applications. That includes the challenges of dealing with fonts, writing, transliteration, and more. Read the upstream story from the people who did the work. At conf.kde.in both Kannan and Subin spoke about Malayalam topics; Kannan about the newspaper, and Subin about KDE bits. I showed off Calamares running in Malayalam as well, although since I hadn’t prepared that, I didn’t have proper Indic fonts installed and it was terribly ugly. In Hindi it looked ok, so there’s plenty of work for system integrators to do to deliver a good-looking localized desktop there.

    Since I was also giving a talk about translations and one about Calamares, I decided to canvas for more translators. Gujrati, for instance, has only one translator and not much work done, so I was hoping to find some helpers.

  • Season of KDE

    I am thrilled to be a part of Season of KDE 2020. I am working with the KDE Web and Calligra teams to create a new website for the Calligra Suite. The project involves converting the website to jekyll so that it is inline with the rest of the KDE websites.

    I got involved with KDE in december 2019 by joining their telegram group. I have been trying to contribute to open source projects since a long time but always found it difficult getting started. KDE dev’s helped me get started. I would especially like to thank my mentor Carl Schwan for guiding me in contributing to KDE.

    As mentioned in my previous post, I’ll be documenting my Season of KDE journey in this blog. This is first report for my project.

  • Guest Post: Current State of ComDaAn: Community Data Analytics, by Christelle Zouein

    Paul Adams is a developer renowned for his work in the field of free software and his many contributions to the KDE FOSS community. Before retiring from KDE, Adams provided the community with a service in the form of community data visualization using git repositories. To ensure the continuity of the service, Kevin Ottens, Libre software craftsman and developer at enioka Haute Couture, decided to take over.

    And so, ComDaAn took form as a way of modernizing Paul Adams’ scripts while staying true to his vision.

    That later turned into a complete rewrite with the purpose of creating a solid base for community data analytics in general. The project then became a suite of tools to study and analyze data produced by software communities and teams.

CBS All Access serves ads, but not content, to Linux users

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Movies

I'm both a Linux user and a CBS All Access subscriber myself, but I had been unaware of the problem since I do all my own watching on a Roku. Technically, the Roku is a Linux PC in its own right—but CBS has its own app in the Roku store, which works perfectly.

Moving back to one of my own PCs, I was quickly able to confirm the issue: trailers autoplay properly, and even the ads work—but the actual content won't play on a Linux desktop PC on any browser including Google Chrome. Diving into the Chrome Web Console, we can see HTTP 400 (Bad Request) errors when the browser attempts to fetch a license from CBS' Widevine back end.

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Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, Linux Headlines, FLOSS Weekly, Full Circle Weekly News and GNU/Linux Vloggers

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • mintCast 327 – The Mozilla Thrilla

    First up, in our Wanderings, I follow in Tony H?s footsteps and paint, Tony H upgrades a laptop and attends another LUG, Josh returns, Moss meets a mintCast listener, Joe listens to more books and learns about Cockpit, and Tony Watts edits video and works on his Studio.

    Then in our news a new Wine, GParted, Edge and Yaru theme for Ubuntu. The Pinephone ships and Firefox runs into issues.

  • 2020-01-29 | Linux Headlines

    LibreOffice focuses on performance, a new FreeNAS release is out, Thunderbird gets a new home, and more.

  • FLOSS Weekly 564: Open Mainframe Update

    The Open Mainframe Project is to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. The project intends to increase collaboration across the mainframe community and to develop shared toolsets and resources. Furthermore, the project seeks to involve the participation of academic institutions to assist in teaching and educating the mainframe engineers and developers of tomorrow.

  • Full Circle Weekly News #162

    Arch Linux Now Using ZStandard Instead of XZ for Compression
    https://www.archlinux.org/news/now-using-zstandard-instead-of-xz-for-package-compression/

    EA Is Permanently Banning Linux Gamers in Battlefield V
    https://itsfoss.com/ea-banning-linux-gamers/

    OpenBSD’s Calm Window Manager version 6.6 is now available in a portable package
    https://github.com/leahneukirchen/cwm

    Smartmontools 7.1 is available
    https://www.smartmontools.org/browser/tags/RELEASE_7_1/smartmontools/NEWS

    Supertux Cart 1.1 is available with better multiplayer
    http://blog.supertuxkart.net/2020/01/supertuxkart-11-released.html

    GitBucket has released version 4.33.0
    https://gitbucket.github.io/gitbucket-news/gitbucket/2019/12/31/gitbucket-4.33.0.html

    Linux Kernel 5.5 rc5 is available
    https://lkml.org/lkml/2020/1/5/185

    Credits:
    Ubuntu “Complete” sound: Canonical

    Theme Music: From The Dust – Stardust
    https://soundcloud.com/ftdmusic
    https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

  • Most Dangerous Tech Job in the World?

    There's one tech job that's easy to get into, and HARD to get out of. Know what you're getting yourself into, and know how you'll get out if you've had enough.

  • My YouTube Recording Studio Layout and Gear

    As I navigate trying to improve my video and audio quality, I figured I would create a video to show off some of my customizations and how my studio is set up. I'll talk about my recording gear, and more. It's still a work in progress, but here I show it's current state.

Here’s Ubuntu Touch Running on the PinePhone

Filed under
Ubuntu
Gadgets

UBports’ Marius Gripsgård has shared today on YouTube a more in depth overview of the Ubuntu Touch mobile operating system on the PinePhone Linux phone.

The PinePine is already shipping to customers who pre-ordered the BraveHeart edition, but the new Linux phone doesn’t ship with an operating system pre-installed. Several options are available though, including Ubuntu Touch and Plasma Mobile.

Its makers, PINE64, are currently waiting for a Linux mobile OS vendor to port their operating system to the PinePhone before shipping the second edition in spring 2020, and I really hope that Ubuntu Touch will be the first option they choose.

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Snowflake is the Linux SSH GUI you didn't know you needed

Filed under
Linux

Every single day I rely on secure shell. 90% of the time I'm using that tool from the Linux platform, where I open a terminal window and SSH into what seems like an endless array of remote servers. Because I'm accessing so many servers, having a GUI tool makes that task less of a strain on my memory.

What IP address goes to what server? There are so many of them.

That's why I've taken to using the Snowflake GUI tool. Snowflake includes a connection manager, file browser, terminal emulator, resource/processor manager, disk space analyzer, text editor, log viewer, SSH key authentication support, and more.

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Libvirt, PHP, FFmpeg Updates Roll Out on Tumbleweed

Filed under
SUSE

The 1.4 version of kdeconnect-kde was updated in the most recent 20200127 snapshot. The version offers a new “KDE Connect” desktop app to control the phone from the PC and SMS app that can read and write SMS texts. The newer version also offers compatibility with Xfce‘s file manager Thunar. The third release candidate for LibreOffice requires java 1.8 or newer with the libreoffice 6.4.0.3 package. Some core and curl bugs were fixed with php7 7.4.2, which included an Exif fix, and a handful of rubygem packages had minor version bumps. The snapshot is currently trending at a stable rating of 99, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Snapshot, 20200125 had a half dozen packages updated. GNU’s Utilities tool package for multi-lingual messaging, gettext-runtime 0.20.1, removed dynamic linker ldconfig and script builder autoreconf. GNU Multiple Precision Arithmetic Library has a new C++ function in the gmp 6.2.0 update and the new version provides better assembly code and greater speed for AMD Ryzen, Power9 and ARM 64-bit CPUs. An updated to the authentication-related tool shadow 4.8 synced password field descriptions in man pages and migrated to ITS Tool for translations. The snapshot is currently trending at a stable rating of 99.

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Python Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Python '!=' Is Not 'is not': Comparing Objects in Python

    There’s a subtle difference between the Python identity operator (is) and the equality operator (==). Your code can run fine when you use the Python is operator to compare numbers, until it suddenly doesn’t. You might have heard somewhere that the Python is operator is faster than the == operator, or you may feel that it looks more Pythonic. However, it’s crucial to keep in mind that these operators don’t behave quite the same.

    The == operator compares the value or equality of two objects, whereas the Python is operator checks whether two variables point to the same object in memory. In the vast majority of cases, this means you should use the equality operators == and !=, except when you’re comparing to None.

  • Webinar: “Security Checks for Python Code” with Anthony Shaw

    Software has security issues, Python is software, so how do Python developers avoid common traps? In this webinar, Anthony Shaw discusses the topic of security vulnerabilities, how code quality tools can help, and demonstrates the PyCharm plugin he wrote to let the IDE help.

  • Leysin Winter sprint 2020: Feb 29 - March 8th

    The next PyPy sprint will be in Leysin, Switzerland, for the fourteenth time. This is a fully public sprint: newcomers and topics other than those proposed below are welcome.

  • [Old] BPF Theremin, Tetris, and Typewriters

    If you wish to develop your own BPF observability tools, start with bpftrace and only use BCC when needed. My BPF Performance Tools book has plenty of examples. This is the culmination of five years of work: the BPF kernel runtime, C support, LLVM and Clang support, the BCC front-end, and finally the bpftrace language. Starting with other interfaces is like writing your first Java program in JVM bytecode. You can...but if you're looking for an educational exercise, I'd recommend using BPF tools to find performance wins.

  • Introducing Anaconda Team Edition: Secure Open-Source Data Science for the Enterprise

    I’m very excited to announce a new addition to Anaconda’s product line — Anaconda Team Edition!

    For the last few years, Anaconda has offered two products: our free Anaconda Distribution, meant for individual practitioners, and Anaconda Enterprise, our full-featured machine learning platform for the enterprise. This left a gap for many data scientists and developers who use Anaconda professionally, but whose companies either do not yet need a fully-featured machine learning platform, or are building their own solution.

    But even for these companies, open-source data science and machine learning tools are largely undermanaged. There are thousands of open-source packages data scientists and developers could bring into an organization, unaware of potential security or licensing implications. Moreover, these packages have complex inter-dependencies and intricate build requirements, which are underserved by traditional IT OSS management solutions.

    Many of our enterprise users have been asking for the convenience and security of mirroring Anaconda’s repository onto their own infrastructure, using an official facility rather than relying on our community-facing free services. This is why we are offering Anaconda Team Edition.

More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 21.04 (Hirsute Hippo) Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 Now

Dubbed by Canonical as the “Hirsute Hippo,” Ubuntu 21.04 was released nine months ago, on April 22nd, 2021. It was the first Ubuntu release to use the next-generation Wayland display server by default for its Ubuntu Desktop flavor, which uses a modified version of the GNOME desktop environment. Ubuntu 21.04 didn’t make the plunge into the GNOME 40 desktop environment series due to its redesigned Activities Overview, but it did ship with support for GNOME 40 apps while being built on top of the older GNOME 3.38 desktop environment series. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Supplino is a variable benchtop power supply that you can build yourself | Arduino Blog

    Working with electronics requires access to stable power in a variety of voltages. Some components require 3.3V and others require 5V. Still others need 9V or 12V — there are many possibilities. You could keep a variety of wall warts on hand, but a variable benchtop power supply is a more convenient option. Supplino is one choice and this guide from Giovanni Bernardo and Paolo Loberto will walk you through how to build one. Supplino can accept anything from 4 to 40 volts and can output anything from 1.25 to 36 volts, with a maximum of 5A. An XH-M401 module with an XL4016E1 DC-DC buck converter handles the voltage regulation. Technically, you could use that alone to power your components. But the addition of an Arduino Nano board (or Nano Every) makes the experience far friendlier. It monitors the power supply output and drives a 1.8″ 128×160 TFT LCD screen, which displays the present voltage, amperage, and wattage.

  • Relocating Fedora's RPM database [LWN.net]

    The deadlines for various kinds of Fedora 36 change proposals have mostly passed at this point, which led to something of a flurry of postings to the distribution's devel mailing list over the last month. One of those, for a seemingly fairly innocuous relocation of the RPM database from /var to /usr, came in right at the buzzer for system-wide changes on December 29. There were, of course, other things going on around that time, holidays, vacations, and so forth, so the discussion was relatively muted until recently. Proponents have a number of reasons why they would like to see the move, but there is resistance, as well, that is due, at least in part, to the longstanding "tradition" of the location for the database.

  • CPU Isolation – A practical example – by SUSE Labs (part 5)
  • How to install Mantis bug tracker on Debian 11?

    Hello friends. In this post, you will learn how to install Mantis Bug Tracker on Debian 11.

Server: MongoDB vs. DynamoDB, Mirantis, and More

  • MongoDB vs. DynamoDB: What you need to know

    NoSQL databases have become more popular because of the need for more flexible backend solutions. These databases run applications that require a more flexible data structure than traditional structured databases can provide. Robust feature-rich NoSQL database platforms famous for NoSQL databases include MongoDB and DynamoDB. This article guide will compare these two databases to help you choose the right one for your project.

  • Mirantis brings secure registries to Kubernetes distros | ZDNet

    Mirantis Secure Registry, formerly Docker Trusted Registry, provides an enterprise-grade container registry solution. You can use this as a foundation to build a secure software supply chain. It does this by providing you with access to a container image registry that has enhanced levels of security beyond that of public registries. This, in turn, gives you more control over this critical part of their software supply chain. The comprehensive, built-in security enables users to verify and trust the automated operations and integration with Continuous Integration/Continuous Delivery (CI/CD) pipelines to speed up application testing and delivery. You can use MSR alongside your other apps in any standard Kubernetes 1.20 and above distribution, via standard Helm techniques. While the new MSR is no longer integrated with Mirantis Kubernetes Engine (MKE) as it was earlier, it still runs as well as ever on MKE as it does with any other supported Kubernetes distribution.

  • How North Dakota Is More Like Windows than UNIX

    If your official name is YATES, you can't (and presumably needn't) file a petition to change it to Yates. "Petitioners have offered no authority or reasoned argument that there is any legal significance to the capitalization of their names."

  • The Success of ‘Open-hearted’ Partnerships in the Cloud | SUSE Communities

    The future is open — and it’s better together. At SUSE, we pride ourselves on our partnerships, and sometimes what we can achieve together surpasses even our greatest hopes. That’s what our award-winning, cloud-based, high-performance computing (HPC) partnership with UberCloud, Dassault Systèmes, and Google Cloud achieved, by enabling 3DT Holdings researchers to create an affordable, real-time heart surgery simulator for physicians to use when it matters most. This is an ongoing relationship with the Living Heart Project that we think is just the beginning of what this ground-breaking research can achieve — and the lives it can save.

Programming Leftovers

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?

  • An outdated Python for openSUSE Leap [LWN.net]

    Enterprise distributions are famous for maintaining the same versions of software throughout their, normally five-year-plus, support windows. But many of the projects those distributions are based on have far shorter support periods; part of what the enterprise distributions sell is patching over those mismatches. But openSUSE Leap is not exactly an enterprise distribution, so some users are chafing under the restrictions that come from Leap being based on SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLE). In particular, shipping Python 3.6, which reached its end of life at the end of 2021, is seen as problematic for the upcoming Leap 15.4 release. [...] OpenSUSE and SLE have generally been aligned over the years. In 2020, Leap and SLE grew even closer together. The build system and repositories between the two were shared starting with Leap 15.2, which corresponded to the second "service pack" (SP) of SLE (i.e. SLE 15-SP2). In 2021, with Leap 15.3 and SLE 15-SP3, the two distributions effectively merged, such that all of the base packages were shared between the two. To a first approximation, Leap is an openSUSE-branded version of SLE, much like what CentOS used to be for Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

  • Make Your Python CLI Tools Pop With Rich | Hackaday

    It seems as though more and more of the simple command-line tools and small scripts that used to be bash or small c programs are slowly turning into python programs. Of course, we will just have to wait and see if this ultimately turns out to be a good idea. But in the meantime, next time you’re revamping or writing a new tool, why not spice it up with Rich?