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January 2020

Sad news about Scott Rifenbark

Filed under
Obits

I'm sorry to have to pass on the sad news that Scott Rifenbark, our
tech writer for the project passed away on Wednesday after a battle
with cancer.

I remember interviewing Scott over 10 years ago when forming a team at
Intel to work on what became the Yocto Project, he was with it from the
start. He warned me he wasn't an entirely traditional tech writer but I
warned we weren't aiming to be a traditional project either. It was a
great match. He stayed with the project ever since in one way or
another, he enjoyed working on the project and we enjoyed working with
him.

Read more

Windows 10 vs. Ubuntu Linux Performance On A $199 AMD Ryzen Laptop

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

When carrying out our Windows vs. Linux benchmarks we normally are doing so on interesting high-end hardware but for today's benchmarking is a look at how a $199 USD laptop powered by an AMD Ryzen 3 3200U processor compares between Windows 10 as it's shipped on the laptop against the forthcoming Ubuntu 20.04 LTS Linux distribution.

The $199 AMD laptop being used for testing is the Motile M141, a 14-inch laptop with Ryzen 3 3200U and Vega 3 graphics, 4GB of RAM, 120GB solid-state drive, and 1080p display. This 14-inch Ryzen 3 laptop is currently selling for just $199 USD at Walmart. While never hearing of Motile previously, I decided to go ahead and buy this laptop for some Linux testing... Motile is a private-label brand from Walmart.

Read more

Solus Shines With Plasma Desktop Options

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Solus is one of the leading alternative distros to other more mainstream Linux OSes. The 4.1 upgrade, especially the Plasma edition, clearly set the standard that other Linux distributions should follow.

If you are a gamer, take note of this: Solus 4.1 just made gaming simpler. Solus 4.1 ships with increased file limits to enable ESync support. This release also raises the file limits in the PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules) package to Lutris' suggested value. This lets you spend less time configuring your system and more time playing games.

Read more

LibreRouter: An open-source router that offers GPIO pins in a Raspberry Pi form factor

Filed under
OSS

Single-board computers (SBCs) can not only be used as cost-effective options for developers or for creating retro emulators. On the contrary, they can also serve as routers thanks to their wide range of connection options, while some can offer a lot of performance for their size. The Raspberry Pi has practically pre-configured software solutions to this effect, for example.

Now, a DIY solution has been announced by LibreRouter.org. The LR1 is based on a Qualcomm Atheros QCA9558 MIPI processor that can utilise 128 MB of RAM. The router has built-in Wi-Fi too that supports up to IEEE 802.11 b/g/n, while LibreRouter also offers an optional GPS sensor. Using the two mPCIe slots you can connect powerful network cards or cellular routers, too.

Read more

Qt 5.12.7 Released

Filed under
KDE

I am happy to announce we have released Qt 5.12.7 today.

The Qt 5.12 LTS is in 'strict' phase, so it will receive only the selected important bug and security fixes. This 7th patch release for Qt 5.12 LTS series contains almost 50 bug fixes including security issue fixes for both Qt ( CVE-2020-0569 and CVE-2020-0570) and 3rd party components (CVE-2019-19244, CVE-2019-19603, CVE-2019-19242, CVE-2019-19645, CVE-2019-19646 & CVE-2019-19880). Also in QtWebEngine there are many CVE fixes from Chromium. Please check other most important changes from Qt 5.12.7 Changes Files.

Qt 5.12.7 is now available via the maintenance tool of the online installer. For new installations, please download latest online installer from Qt Account portal or from qt.io Download page. Offline packages are available for commercial users in the Qt Account portal and at the qt.io Download page for open-source users. You can also try out the Commercial evaluation option from the qt.io Download page.

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Pentoo – A Security-Focused Linux Distro Based on Gentoo

Filed under
Gentoo
Security

Pentoo is an open-source Live CD and Live USB Gentoo Linux-based operating system designed for experts in the field of penetration testing and security assessment. It is available for both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures and is can be run as an overlay on an existing Gentoo installation.

If you’re not familiar with Gentoo Linux, it is an advanced Linux distro that enables users to compile their operating system from the source in other to enjoy advantages such as applications and optimal performance specific to the computer, to mention a couple.

It does not have an installer and users are to translate the software they want before continuing with the installation. In short, one shouldn’t go near it if they don’t have the perseverance for filing through Linux documentation.

Just like with Gentoo, Pentoo has an advanced Python-based package management system with cool features such as “fake” (OpenBSD-style) installs, system profiles, config file management, safe unmerging, and virtual packages, among others.

Read more

/e/OS and the Art of Remote Project Management

Filed under
OS
Android

In this article, we look behind the scenes to understand how the team at /e/OS works!
For those who have not been following up on the developments in the smartphone OS world, /e/ OS is a de-googled, privacy-focused, android-based smartphone operating system. The project is the brain child of Gaël Duval, the man who created Mandrake Linux. /e/OS is forked from LineageOS.
The team did not just stop with the forking. First, they removed the Google calls which were spread all over the source code. Next, they replaced several of the default apps and added FOSS replacements. With a single /e/ account, user data on the phone could be automatically synchronized with ecloud servers. What data was to be synced can be controlled by the user.
By the middle of 2018, the beta version of the /e/OS was ready. /e/OS today supports 91 smartphones. For those who are not comfortable flashing their smartphones, /e/ offers a range of refurbished smartphones, which can be purchased with /e/OS already flashed on them. Currently they are testing Mail-in-your-phone, a service where users who are not confident flashing their own devices, can send it to /e/ and get it flashed!
All this forking, debugging, rewriting and modification requires design, development and testing efforts. After the OS is flashed on smartphones, support for the end users is required.
Lets understand how /e/ manages all these different activities.

Read more

Also: /e/ OS and the Art of Remote Project Management

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla Firefox: Spyware, Password Loggers, and Performance Monitoring

  • This Week in Glean: Designing a telemetry collection with Glean

    (“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean.) All “This Week in Glean” blog posts are listed in the TWiG index). Whenever I get a chance to write about Glean, I am usually writing about some aspects of working on Glean. This time around I’m going to turn that on its head by sharing my experience working with Glean as a consumer with metrics to collect, specifically in regards to designing a Nimbus health metrics collection. This post is about sharing what I learned from the experience and what I found to be the most important considerations when designing a telemetry collection. I’ve been helping develop Nimbus, Mozilla’s new experimentation platform, for a while now. It is one of many cross-platform tools written in Rust and it exists as part of the Mozilla Application Services collection of components. With Nimbus being used in more and more products we have a need to monitor its “health”, or how well it is performing in the wild. I took on this task of determining what we would need to measure and designing the telemetry and visualizations because I was interested in experiencing Glean from a consumer’s perspective.

  • Firefox Add-on Reviews: How to choose the right password manager browser extension

    All good password managers should, of course, effectively secure passwords; and they all basically do the same thing—you create a single, easy-to-remember master password to access your labyrinth of complex logins. Password managers not only spare you the hassle of remembering a maze of logins; they can also offer suggestions to help make your passwords even stronger. Fortunately there’s no shortage of capable password protectors out there. But with so many options, how to choose the one that’ll work best for you? Here are some of our favorite password managers. They all offer excellent password protection, but with distinct areas of strength.

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (September 2021)

    In September there were 174 alerts generated, resulting in 23 regression bugs being filed on average 6.4 days after the regressing change landed. Welcome to the September 2021 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 25 October 1300 UTC

    Please join us at the next regular Open NeuroFedora team meeting on Monday 25 October at 1300UTC in #fedora-neuro on IRC (Libera.chat). The meeting is a public meeting, and open for everyone to attend.

  • Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending October 16 - RTInsights

    In this week’s real-time analytics news: Red Hat announced updates in its portfolio of tools and programs for building applications on Red Hat OpenShift, and more. Keeping pace with news and developments in the real-time analytics market can be a daunting task. We want to help by providing a summary of some of the items our staff came across each week. Here are some of the news items from this week: Red Hat announced a series of updates in its portfolio of developer tools and programs for developers building applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The updates were to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift GitOps, and the Red Hat build of Quarkus. Additionally, Red Hat expanded the roster of training resources available on Kube By Example.

  • What I learned about Kubernetes and Knative Serverless

    If you happened to miss this year’s Kubernetes Summer Camp, there’s some good news! The sessions were recorded and are available for on-demand viewing. Along with those, you’ll also get access to a variety of downloadable content, including a free O’Reilly e-book.

  • Awards roll call: August to October 2021 [Ed: Those accolades and fake rewards/awards can easily be bought; they let you game the system for money]

    From workplace accolades to product wins, we are proud to be able to highlight some aspects of our company and the recognition they’ve received in the past few months. We recently published our DEI Statement, which declares our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion—not just for our associates, but for our partners, customers and open source contributors. Our culture is rooted in transparency, collaboration, and inclusion—open source principles that continue to drive our company forward. We see the following awards as a recognition of our open source-driven innovation, where the best ideas can come from anywhere and anyone.

Study of Editable Strokes for Inking

So, with Krita 5.0 nearing completion. There’s been some discussion about what we’ll do next. On of the proposed topics has been to replace our calligraphy tool with something that can produce nice variable width editable lines. Read more

Screencasts/Shows/Videos: KaOS 2021.10, Ubuntu Kylin 21.10, Late Night Linux, Linux in the Ham Shack

  • KaOS 2021.10 Run Through - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at KaOS 2021.10. Enjoy!

  • Linux overview | Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 - Invidious

    In this video, I am going to show an overview of Ubuntu Kylin 21.10 and some of the applications pre-installed.

  • A Terror So Terrifying, You'll Swear It's Just A Myth - Invidious

    This Halloween comes a film so terrifying that you will swear it's just an urban legend. You think nothing bad can ever happen to you. After all, you run Linux! But what did you install on that Linux machine? And what does it want from you?

  • Late Night Linux – Episode 147

    The pros and cons of tiling window managers, and how we nearly use them. Plus your feedback about Flatpak, Firefox as a Snap, a web-based image editor, starting a FOSS career, and why we have a Telegram group instead of IRC or Matrix.

  • FOSS Alternatives For The Windows Refugee - Invidious

    When you first switch to Linux it can be hard to out what alternatives you should look into for the apps that you want to run so today we're going to look at exactly that

  • LHS Episode #436: Bowling for Ham Radio

    Hello and welcome to Episode 436 of Linux in the Ham Shack. In this short-topics episode, the hosts discuss an ARDC grant for high school STEM students, a pair of intrepid amateur radio hobbyists, state-sponsored ARCs in Africa, Ubuntu 21.10, Sysmon for Linux and much more. Thank you for listening and have a great week.