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April 2020

scrcpy 1.13 Released and COVID-19 Response by Rocket.Chat

Filed under
Software
OSS
  • scrcpy 1.13 Released With Improved Display Quality, Option To Lock Video Orientation, More

    scrcpy 1.13 has been released with some important new features, including option to lock the video orientation, shortcuts to rotate the display, and trilinear filtering which should improve the display quality when the scrcpy window is much smaller than the Android device display.

    New to scrcpy? This is an application that can be used to display, record and control Android devices connected via USB or wirelessly, from a macOS, Windows or Linux desktop. The application focuses on performance and quality, offering 30~60 FPS with a resolution of 1920x1080 or more, and low latency.

    The communication between the server (Android device in this case) and client (desktop computer) is done via a socket over an adb tunnel. The server streams H.264 video of the device screen, passing it to the client to decode and display it, without buffering in order to minimize latency. The mouse and keyboard events are captured and transmitted to the server, which injects them to the Android device.

  • How Open-Source And AI Are Helping Brazil To Spot COVID-19

    The arrival of COVID-19 brought complex challenges worldwide. In Latin America, precisely in Brazil, the worst pandemic seen in a century challenges states, cities, and public health care management. Recently, the country surpassed China in the total number of confirmed deaths

    With cases expected to accelerate in Latin America’s biggest country, a question arises: How to provide healthcare services in Brazil without overloading the health system and reducing the pace of contagion?

    To answer that question and propose a solution, Rocket.Chat, a Brazilian startup responsible for one of the main open-source communication hub partnered with Amazon and tech players, such as Ilhasoft, Elogroup, and Konecty to build a digital assistance platform for COVID-19.

LWN on Kernel Development, Debian Discussing Discourse

Filed under
Linux
Debian
  • The integrity policy enforcement security module

    There are many ways to try to keep a system secure. One of those, often employed in embedded or other dedicated-purpose systems, is to try to ensure that only code that has been approved (by whoever holds that power over the system in question) can be executed. The secure boot mechanism, which is intended to keep a computer from booting anything but a trusted kernel, is one piece of this puzzle, but its protection only extends through the process of booting the kernel itself. Various mechanisms exist for protecting a system after it boots; a new option for this stage is the Integrity Policy Enforcement (IPE) security module, posted by Deven Bowers.
    IPE is one of a new generation of security modules that has been enabled by the ongoing work to implement module stacking. It does not attempt to provide a full security enforcement mechanism like SELinux, AppArmor, or Smack do; instead, it focuses specifically on the task of vetting attempts to execute code. And, in particular, its enforcement mechanism comes down to a simple question: does the code that the system is proposing to execute come from an appropriately signed disk volume?

    IPE is designed to work with dm-verity, which provides integrity checking for block devices. Each dm-verity volume has a root hash, which is derived from the hashes of the individual blocks in that volume. Whenever blocks are read from this volume, the hashes are checked up to the root to ensure that nothing has been tampered with. Assuming everything is working as intended, the data read from a dm-verity volume is guaranteed to be the data that the creator put there and hashed, with no subsequent tampering.

    While dm-verity can be used to ensure that nobody has corrupted a disk image, there are still a couple of pieces missing when it comes to ensuring the integrity of the system as a whole. One is ensuring that the root hash for the volume is the one that the creator of the volume intended; that can be done by either storing the hash value separately or applying a cryptographic signature. Even a verified, integrity-protected volume is only of limited use, though, if the system is able to execute code that doesn't come from that volume.

  • How to unbreak LTTng

    Back in February, the kernel community discussed the removal of a couple of functions that could be used by loadable modules to gain access to symbols (functions and data structures) that were not meant to be available to them. That change was merged during the 5.7 merge window. This change will break a number of external modules that depended on the removed functions; since many of those modules are proprietary, this fact does not cause a great deal of anguish in the kernel community. But there are a few out-of-tree modules with GPL-compatible licenses that are also affected by this change; one of those is LTTng. Fixing LTTng may not be entirely straightforward.
    LTTng is a tracing subsystem; to carry out that sort of task, it must be able to hook into the kernel in a number of fairly deep places. It is unsurprising that LTTng was accessing parts of the kernel that are not deemed suitable for export to modules in general. Losing access to kallsyms_on_each_symbol() deprived LTTng of the ability to find those addresses, thus breaking much of its functionality. That is not welcome news to those who work on — or use — LTTng.

    LTTng developer Mathieu Desnoyers has responded to this change with a patch series exporting a number of new symbols; with those available, LTTng can do what it needs to do without using the rather more general kallsyms_on_each_symbol() function. For example, LTTng needs access to stack_trace_save_user() to be able to save user-space stack traces. It also needs access to functions like task_prio(), disk_name(), and get_pfn_blocks_mask(). LTTng obtains kernel information from tracepoints as well, of course, and that usage will increase as tracepoints replace some of the direct internal accesses that were used before. The patch set raises the number of arguments that can be passed to a BPF program from a tracepoint to an eye-opening 13 (to allow more information to be passed out via a specific tracepoint), but that change may prove to be unnecessary in the end.

  • Proactive compaction for the kernel

    Many applications benefit significantly from the use of huge pages. However, huge-page allocations often incur a high latency or even fail under fragmented memory conditions. Proactive compaction may provide an effective solution to these problems by doing memory compaction in the background. With my proposed proactive compaction implementation, typical huge-page allocation latencies are reduced by a factor of 70-80 while incurring minimal CPU overhead.

    Memory compaction is a feature of the Linux kernel that makes larger, physically contiguous blocks of free memory available. Currently, the kernel uses an on-demand compaction scheme. Whenever a per-node kcompactd thread is woken up, it compacts just enough memory to make available a single page of the needed size. Once a page of that size is made available, the thread goes back to sleep. This pattern of compaction often causes a high latency for higher-order allocations and hurts performance for workloads that need to burst-allocate a large number of huge pages.

    Experiments where compaction is manually triggered on a system with a fragmented memory state show that it could be brought to a fairly compacted memory state within one second for a 32GB system. Such data suggests that a proactive compaction scheme in the kernel could allow allocating a significant fraction of memory as huge pages while keeping allocation latencies low.

  • Debian discusses Discourse

    Given the recent history of attacks on the Debian project, arguments against moderation of the communication channels seem less likely than usual to find wide support.

    That said, the way in which Discourse handles moderation did raise a few eyebrows. Rather than having specific people designated as moderators, Discourse spreads that task among the "trusted" members of the community. There are, by default, five trust levels; new users start at level 0 and work their way up from there. At level 3, users can flag posts and cause them to be hidden.

    Movement through the trust levels is managed automatically by the system (with the exception of the highest level, which requires manual promotion). Moving up requires that the user spend a specific amount of time on the site, read a certain number of articles, hand out and receive "likes", and more. To implement this mechanism, Discourse tracks the amount of time spent reading each article. Reaching level 3 requires visiting the site 50 out of the last 100 days, replying to at least ten different topics, viewing at least 25% of new topics, and more. Users can be demoted back to level 2 if they fail to maintain that level of performance.

    This aspect of Discourse repels a number of Debian developers for a couple of reasons. Debian folks are naturally resistant to the idea of a communication system that is monitoring their activity, tracking the time spent on each topic, and making decisions based on that data. Many of them use free software precisely to get away from that kind of thing. They also dislike the whole "gamification" aspect of this system — a feeling that is only made stronger by the extensive system of "badges" handed out by the system to encourage various types of activity.

Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Thursday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, git, and webkit2gtk), Debian (nodejs and tiff), Fedora (libxml2, php-horde-horde, pxz, and sqliteodbc), Oracle (python-twisted-web), Red Hat (chromium-browser, git, and rh-git218-git), Scientific Linux (python-twisted-web), SUSE (ceph, kernel, munge, openldap2, salt, squid, and xen), and Ubuntu (mailman, python3.8, samba, and webkit2gtk).

  • WordPress 5.4.1 fixes 7 security vulnerabilities

    WordPress 5.4.1 is now available!

    This security and maintenance release features 17 bug fixes in addition to 7 security fixes. Because this is a security release, it is recommended that you update your sites immediately. All versions since WordPress 3.7 have also been updated.

  • Almost Every Antivirus Software Program Can Be Exploited, Researchers Say

    RACK911 Labs has found a unique method of using directory junctions (in Windows) and symlinks (in macOS and Linux) to turn antivirus software products into self-destructive tools. However, it was reported that most of the antivirus companies have now fixed the vulnerability in their products.

    Researchers stated that an attacker must be highly time-sensitive and should know when to exploit the directory junction or symlink vulnerabilities. “What most antivirus software fail to take into consideration is the small window of time between the initial file scan that detects the malicious file and the cleanup operation that takes place immediately after. A malicious local user or malware author is often able to perform a race condition via a directory junction (Windows) or a symlink (Linux & macOS) that leverages the privileged file operations to disable the antivirus software or interfere with the operating system to render it useless,” the researchers explained.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Fuzzing with WebIDL

    Fuzzing, or fuzz testing, is an automated approach for testing the safety and stability of software. It’s typically performed by supplying specially crafted inputs to identify unexpected or even dangerous behavior. If you’re unfamiliar with the basics of fuzzing, you can find lots more information in the Firefox Fuzzing Docs and the Fuzzing Book.

    For the past 3 years, the Firefox fuzzing team has been developing a new fuzzer to help identify security vulnerabilities in the implementation of WebAPIs in Firefox. This fuzzer, which we’re calling Domino, leverages the WebAPIs’ own WebIDL definitions as a fuzzing grammar. Our approach has led to the identification of over 850 bugs. 116 of those bugs have received a security rating. In this post, I’d like to discuss some of Domino’s key features and how they differ from our previous WebAPI fuzzing efforts.

  • Belkin Shut Down Wemo NetCam Feeds

    One of the major downsides of an IoT system provided by another company is that it will eventually die out. Companies can’t afford to maintain a service forever and will eventually let it go. Belkin made a shock announcement when they stated they will no longer support their Wemo NetCam product.

Graphics: Mesa 20.1, X.Org Board Elections, AMD, OpenXR

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
  • mesa 20.1.0-rc1
    I'd like to announce the first release candidate of the 20.1 branch,
    Mesa 20.1.0-rc1.
    
    Please test it, and report any issues you might find to:
    https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/issues/new
    
    We also have a GitLab milestone to track issues that need to be fixed
    and MRs that need to be merged before 20.1.0 final. Please add it to
    the relevant issues & MRs:
    https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/mesa/mesa/milestones/14
    
    The next release candidate is scheduled for 7 days from now, on
    2020-05-06.
    
    Eric
    
    
  • Mesa 20.1 Feature Development Ends With RC1 Released

    Mesa 20.1 feature development is now over with it being branched from Git master and subsequently Mesa 20.1-RC1 being released this evening.

    Mesa 20.1 is the Q2'2020 update to this collection of open-source graphics drivers, predominantly Vulkan and OpenCL driver implementations for the likes of not only Intel, Radeon, and Nouveau (NVIDIA) graphics but also Arm/SoC graphics drivers as well.

  • X.Org Board Elections Wrap Up For 2020

    They join existing X.Org board members Samuel Iglesias Gonsálvez [Igalia], Manasi D Navare [Intel], Lyude Paul [Red Hat], and Daniel Vetter [Intel]. Of the new members, three of them previously served with Collabora's Mark Filion being new to the foundation's board.

    The X.Org Board of Directors is principally responsible for organizing the annual XDC developer conference, overseeing the X.Org Endless Vacation of Code and their usual participation within the Google Summer of Code, arranging sponsorships and travel reimbursements and other finances under the SPI, and related matters like their skyrocketing cloud costs associated with the X.Org/FD.o CI.

  • AMD AOMP 11.5 Released For OpenMP Offloading To Radeon GPUs

    Released on Wednesday was AOMP 11.5 as the latest version of the AMD/ROCm compiler based off LLVM Clang and focused on OpenMP offloading to Radeon GPUs.

    AOMP is part of the ROCm umbrella for Radeon OpenMP device offloading. This is a branched version of upstream LLVM Clang that recently was re-based to LLVM 11 development code and thus the version number for AOMP.

  • AMDVLK 2020.Q2.2 Flips On The Pipeline Binary Cache, Tunes SoTR Performance

    AMDVLK 2020.Q2.2 has been issued today as the company's latest open-source AMD Radeon Vulkan driver based off their official driver source tree.

    With this second AMDVLK driver snapshot of Q2-2020, there are a few notable changes in tow. The AMDVLK pipeline binary cache has been enabled by default for helping with load times. AMDVLK also now supports the Vulkan memory protected bit (VK_MEMORY_PROPERTY_PROTECTED_BIT). This driver update has also seen more performance optimization work around the few month old Linux port of Shadow of the Tomb Raider.

  • Service process and out of process compositing in Monado

    Moving all drivers and the compositor to the service process brings many advantages to the previous in-process model. For this input and rendering needed to be sent over our new IPC infrastructure. With a separate render loop, now independent of the OpenXR client, the compositor can provide a constant frame rate, even when the application doesn't deliver frames on time. This is required and the foundation of future reprojection work, where old frames can be transformed with new tracking data for a smoother experience if the client lags behind. In addition, the obvious advantage of an out of process compositor is that the compositor can be started asynchronously to the application and run on its own without any application. This is also required for running multiple clients in the future and for implementing OpenXR extensions like XR_EXTX_overlay.

    Amongst other small improvements to the compositor we improved support for direct mode on NVIDIA by recognizing more display identifiers like the Valve Index and the Oculus Rift series of HMDs.

  • Open-source OpenXR runtime for Linux 'Monado' gets an improved compositor - runs Blender VR

    Those crazy-smart folks over at Collabora have continued hacking away on Monado, a fully open source OpenXR (VR / AR standard) runtime for Linux. Now it's progressed quite far and it can run Blender VR.

    A refresher on Monado: Monado is the first OpenXR runtime for GNU/Linux. Monado hopes to jump-start development of an open source XR ecosystem and provide the fundamental building blocks for device vendors to target the GNU/Linux platform.
    Writing on the Collabora development blog, engineer Lubosz Sarnecki mentioned that Monado now has a "new monado-service binary and out of process compositor" which brings several advantages over the original in-process model. It now has a separate render loop, with the compositor now being able to provide a constant frame rate "even when the application doesn't deliver frames on time". Something that's absolutely vital to produce a smoother experience and help prevent nausea.

Red Hat/Fedora: Summit, OpenShift 4.4, Fedora and Taskotron EOL

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Recapping day two of Red Hat Summit Virtual Experience

    Anybody who thinks open source enterprise software is boring has clearly never watched a demo with Red Hat's Burr Sutter at the helm. Sutter and team pulled together a fantastic demo that showed how Red Hat's portfolio can come together to provide an application platform for global organizations.

    In real time, the team updated an application, added a Red Hat OpenShift cluster, added features, tested failover, and handled thousands of users interacting with the application. A real showcase for what edge computing and the open hybrid cloud can do. If you missed it, be sure to read our blog about the day's demos and catch the replay on demand.

    We know that the concept of the datacenter is changing, and that there's been increasing demand pushing compute to the network edge. During Red Hat CTO Chris Wright's session, we had a look at how Red Hat is using AI and data, through our implementation of Open Data Hub, to help our customers based on data from connected systems.

  • The Specter of Coronavirus Dominates Red Hat Summit 2020

    Despite everyone sheltering in place, it was impossible to avoid COVID-19 during the Linux vendor’s virtual Red Hat Summit 2020 event.

  • What’s new in the OpenShift 4.4 web console developer experience

    The developer experience in the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform web console keeps getting better. You’ve probably already heard about our streamlined user flows to build and deploy applications, plus the ability to understand the structure of your application via the Topology view. Each new release of Red Hat OpenShift includes usability improvements and new features to help developers reach their goals.

  • Creating Pipelines with OpenShift 4.4’s new Pipeline Builder and Tekton Pipelines
  • Serverless applications made faster and simpler with OpenShift Serverless GA
  • Application deployment improvements in OpenShift 4.4
  • Join a Fedora Ask Me Anything (AMA)

    The admins of Fedora Telegram group, would like to invite you to participate in a big “ask me anything” (AMA) session. Join us on May 6th at 18:00 UTC (14:00 US/Eastern) in the Fedoraama telegram group (bridged to #fedora-ama on Freenode IRC). The session is expected to span an hour and a half.

  • PHP version 7.3.18RC1 and 7.4.6RC1

    Release Candidate versions are available in testing repository for Fedora and Enterprise Linux (RHEL / CentOS) to allow more people to test them. They are available as Software Collections, for a parallel installation, perfect solution for such tests, and also as base packages.

    RPM of PHP version 7.4.6RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 32 or remi-php74-test repository for Fedora 30-31 and Enterprise Linux 7-8.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.18RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

  • Taskotron is EOL (end of life) today

    As previously announced, Taskotron (project page) will be shut down today. See the announcement and its discussion for more details and some background info.

    As a result, certain tests (beginning with “dist.“) will no longer appear for new updates in Bodhi (in Automated Tests tab). Some of those tests (and even new ones) will hopefully come back in the future with the help of Fedora CI.

Debian LTS, Sparky and DOSEMU in Debian 10

Filed under
Debian
  • Mike Gabriel: My Work on Debian LTS (April 2020)

    Due to sickness I was not able to complete my 8 hours of work on Debian LTS as planned. I only worked 1.5 hours this month, moving the remaining 6.5 hours over to May.

  • Sparky news 2020/04

    The 4rd monthly report of 2020 of the Sparky project:

    • Linux kernel updated up to version 5.6.8 & 5.7-rc3
    • added to our repos: Picom, Sparky-Picom, Delta Chat Desktop, jgmenu, Waterfox current
    • changed ‘obmenu’ to ‘jgmenu’ at Sparky Openbox edition of the rolling line
    • Sparky stable 5.11 released
    • Sparky 2020.04~dev0 with experimental support of installation on machines with Secure Boot released
    • lami07 hard works on a modern version of Openbox edition called “Noir”, which will be available to install via APTus and Minimal iso, stay tuned
    • ‘sparky-su’ has gotten an option to check given password

  • DOSEMU in Debian 10

    Incredible as it may seem, I still have MS-DOS applications that I need to run. And fortunately, there's a DOS Emulator for Linux, DOSEMU. (There's also DOSBox but I've never used that.) One thing DOSEMU handles well is access to legacy serial and parallel ports; I need that too.

    In Debian 8 it was an easy install; DOSEMU and the required FreeDOS were in the Debian repository. So I was dismayed to find that DOSEMU is not available from the Debian 10 "Buster" repository.

    My first thought was to get DOSEMU straight from the source. They offer a precompiled "binary distribution," but that failed to run. Plan B would be to compile DOSEMU from the provided source packages, but I worried, what if DOSEMU simply isn't compatible with 64-bit Linux?

    So I got curious. 32-bit Debian 8 had DOSEMU. Was it available then for 64-bit? When did it get dropped from the repository?

Python Programming

Filed under
Development
  • Reminder: My free, weekly “Python for non-programmers” course continues on Friday, May 1st
  • How and why I built Data Scraping script in Python3

    I am a Professional Python Developer at W3sols who has built complex data scrapers, Python backends for mobile and web apps. I am working on AI and ML based tech stack these days and plan to progress my career as a Professional AI and ML engineer.

  • PyCharm: R 4.0.0 and better UX in the R Plugin

    Although it has not been a while since our last update release, we’re ready to announce some important enhancements and new features...

  • Full Stack Development in Django

    Talks about how versatile Django could be used by breaking the default Django to mix and match it to fit your own use case. Instead of using what is provided by Django.

  • How I learned Python Programming

    I am a lead Python developer at W3sols and I have been working on Web and its related technology stack for 3 years now.
    I have a high versatility in solving real world problems with different programming languages.
    My expertise is Python 3 and the best part I like to do with it is Data scraping from websites.

  • User Testing Feedback - Building SaaS #54

    In this episode, we worked on issues found from a round of user testing. I talked about how I did user testing with my customer, then started to tackle the usability issues that she identified. We’re taking a break from building the onboarding flow so that we can take some time to address feedback from user testing with my customer. I started the stream by explaining how I set up user testing and what I got out of the experience.

  • Add Python support to Tekton Pipelines

    My colleague Priti Desai has been working on Tekton for more than a year and has made some great contributions. After seeing how much fun she was having, I decided to take a leap in the same direction. Priti already built a Tekton pipeline for Java and JavaScript applications, so I figured adding Python support to her pipeline was a great way to become familiar with Tekton.

  • Debugging C with Python and unittest

    The title makes this sound oddly specific, but the information can be applied to other projects. I am using one of my projects as an example. Let me set things up.

    I work on a project called rpminspect which consists of a frontend program called rpminspect, a shared library called librpminspect, and a test suite primarily written in Python and using the unittest module. I say primarily written in Python because there are some helper programs written in C that the test suite invokes. The Python part is the test suite driver which is invoking the rpminspect program with the right settings and checking the output.

Modernizing AutoYaST

Filed under
SUSE

YaST2 is a venerable project that has been around for more than 20 years now. It keeps evolving and, with every SUSE and openSUSE release, it takes several new features (and a couple of new bugs). Needlessly to say that, to some extent, YaST2 is showing its age. We are aware of it, and we have been working to tackle this problem. The successful rewrite of the storage layer, which brought many features, is an example we can feel proud of.

Now that the development of SLE 15 SP2 and openSUSE Leap 15.2 features is mostly done, we have started to look to AutoYaST. The purpose of this article is to present our initiative to modernize AutoYaST.

Read more

Linux Foundation Miscellany

Filed under
OSS
  • LF Networking Accelerates 5G, Cloud Native, and Edge Readiness with Expanded Projects and Growing Community Ecosystem

    LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across open source networking projects, today announced continued successes with cross-industry, global collaboration. Progress includes the Linux Foundation induction of new project, XGVela, an open source telco Platform as a Service (PaaS) for 5G network functions and related applications; new LFN silver member everis; expanded mentorship and training opportunities; and a new verified product by the OPNFV Verification Program (OVP). Together, these efforts bring additional support for future automation and deployment of 5G, edge, and cloud native networking technologies.

  • Telcos Increase Focus on Cloud Native as LF Networking and Ecosystem Groups Solve Interoperability Challenges

    LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across open source networking projects, today announced a turning point for the industry, with integrated initiatives focused on cloud native interoperability and deployment for telcos. Consolidated efforts among the Common NFVI Telco Taskforce (CNTT), LF Networking’s Compliance and Verification Committee (or OPNFV Verification Program, “OVP”), and the OPNFV project through CNTT’s cloud native “R2” workstreams, OVP’s cloud native “OVP 2.0,” and OPNFV’s renewed commitment to testing and integration alignment with end users indicate a deep commitment to address challenges faced in cloud native adoption.

    “NFV continues to evolve as telcos increasingly adopt cloud native technologies,” said Heather Kirksey, vice president, Community & Ecosystem Development, the Linux Foundation. “Change, however, brings challenges, especially to areas like compliance, testing, automation, and integration. With input from telcos directly, collaborative efforts across CNTT, OVP, and OPNFV enable our ecosystem to benefit from cloud native adoption.”

  • Fact gathering: The first and most important task in software negotiations

    When negotiating a software development agreement, and if the developers for both parties assume that the software will include many pre-existing components, the process will be inefficient and becomes a significant waste of time.

  • LF Edge Expands Ecosystem with Open Horizon, adds Seven New Members and Reaches Critical Deployment Milestones

    LF Edge, an umbrella organization under The Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced continued project momentum with the addition a new project and several technical milestones for EdgeX Foundry, Akraino Edge Stack and Fledge. Additionally, the project welcomes seven new members including CloudBrink, Federated Wireless, Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), Kaloom, Ori Industries, Tensor Networks and VoerEir to its ecosystem.

  • LF Edge Expands Ecosystem with Open Horizon, adds Seven New Members and Reaches Critical Deployment Milestones
  • Open Horizon joins Linux Foundation to grow open edge computing platform

    The Open Horizon software project, the core technology that powers IBM’s edge computing offerings, has joined LF Edge. LF Edge is part of the Linux Foundation and hosts all of their open source projects related to edge computing.

    Edge computing brings computation and data storage closer to where data is created by people, places, and things. Open Horizon simplifies the job of getting the right applications and machine learning onto the right compute devices, and keeps those applications running and updated. With 50% of enterprise data expected to be processed at the edge by 2022, compared to only 10% today, Open Horizon will play a critical role in how data is processed in the era of edge computing

    By contributing this important project to the Linux Foundation, just as the sector is set to experience tremendous growth, IBM has underscored its commitment to trust, transparency, and collaboration on standards in the edge computing space.

    While IBM has been the only developer on the project thus far, open sourcing the core components of Open Horizon enables a broader, more diverse ecosystem to build out the technology into a robust, secure foundation that all solution providers can adopt as their foundation. As a founding member of the LF Edge community, IBM felt this was the most effective organization to form and grow an active community within.

  • Linux Foundation and Intel to train people who are displaced during COVID-19

    The Linux Foundation has announced that it's expanding its Mentorship Program with seed funding from Intel in response to COVID-19. The programme will grow to support interns who have been displaced as a result of the global pandemic and to give individuals an opportunity to reskill for future jobs.

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • Announcement : An AArch64 (Arm64) Darwin port is planned for GCC12

    As many of you know, Apple has now released an AArch64-based version of macOS and desktop/laptop platforms using the ‘M1’ chip to support it. This is in addition to the existing iOS mobile platforms (but shares some of their constraints). There is considerable interest in the user-base for a GCC port (starting with https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96168) - and, of great kudos to the gfortran team, one of the main drivers is folks using Fortran. Fortunately, I was able to obtain access to one of the DTKs, courtesy of the OSS folks, and using that managed to draft an initial attempt at the port last year (however, nowhere near ready for presentation in GCC11). Nevertheless (as an aside) despite being a prototype, the port is in use with many via hombrew, macports or self-builds - which has shaken out some of the fixable bugs. The work done in the prototype identified three issues that could not be coded around without work on generic parts of the compiler. I am very happy to say that two of our colleagues, Andrew Burgess and Maxim Blinov (both from embecosm) have joined me in drafting a postable version of the port and we are seeking sponsorship to finish this in the GCC12 timeframe. Maxim has a lightning talk on the GNU tools track at LPC (right after the steering committee session) that will focus on the two generic issues that we’re tackling (1 and 2 below). Here is a short summary of the issues and proposed solutions (detailed discussion of any of the parts below would better be in new threads).

  • Apple Silicon / M1 Port Planned For GCC 12 - Phoronix

    Developers are hoping for next year's GCC 12 release they will have Apple AArch64 support on Darwin in place for being able to support Apple Silicon -- initially the M1 SoC -- on macOS with GCC. LLVM/Clang has long been supporting AArch64 on macOS given that Apple leverages LLVM/Clang as part of their official Xcode toolchain as the basis for their compiler across macOS to iOS and other products. While the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) supports AArch64 and macOS/Darwin, it hasn't supported the two of them together but there is a port in progress to change it.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.5 on CRAN: More Protect’ion

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN overnight. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. The Protect class now uses the default methods for copy and move constructors and assignment allowing for wide use of the class. The small NumVec class now uses it for its data member.

  • QML Modules in Qt 6.2

    With Qt 6.2 there is, for the first time, a comprehensive build system API that allows you to specify a QML module as a complete, encapsulated unit. This is a significant improvement, but as the concept of QML modules was rather under-developed in Qt 5, even seasoned QML developers might now ask "What exactly is a QML module". In our previous post we have scratched the surface by introducing the CMake API used to define them. We'll take a closer look in this post.

  • Santiago Zarate: So you want to recover and old git branch because it has been overwritten?
  • Start using YAML now | Opensource.com

    YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a human-readable data serialization language. Its syntax is simple and human-readable. It does not contain quotation marks, opening and closing tags, or braces. It does not contain anything which might make it harder for humans to parse nesting rules. You can scan your YAML document and immediately know what's going on. [...] At this point, you know enough YAML to get started. You can play around with the online YAML parser to test yourself. If you work with YAML daily, then this handy cheatsheet will be helpful.

  • 40 C programming examples

    C programming language is one of the popular programming languages for novice programmers. It is a structured programming language that was mainly developed for UNIX operating system. It supports different types of operating systems, and it is very easy to learn. 40 useful C programming examples have been shown in this tutorial for the users who want to learn C programming from the beginning.

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

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  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

Audiocasts/Shows: Full Circle Weekly News, Juno Computers, Kali Linux 2021.3