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July 2020

Stable Kernels: 5.7.12, 5.4.55, 4.19.136, 4.14.191, 4.9.232, and 4.4.232

Filed under
Linux
  • Linux 5.7.12

    I'm announcing the release of the 5.7.12 kernel.

    All users of the 5.7 kernel series must upgrade.

    The updated 5.7.y git tree can be found at:
    git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.7.y
    and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser:
    https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...

  • Linux 5.4.55
  • Linux 4.19.136
  • Linux 4.14.191
  • Linux 4.9.232
  • Linux 4.4.232

The 10 Best Weather Tools for Linux System in 2020

Filed under
Linux
OSS

With the advancement of computers and the internet, we don’t need to look at the television screen or newspaper for weather updates. Rather, we can just pick our phone and get to know the current weather. Even if we are working on our Linux desktop, we can get notified about the forecastings. Thanks to the weather tools for Linux.

Most of the modern Linux distributions come with a default weather app. Yet some distros lack this feature by default. These weather tools can show you a plethora of weather parameters by using the API keys of third-party weather info providers. You just need an internet connection, and you are good to go. Now you don’t need to worry about whether you should take the umbrella with you while going out.

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Librem 14 Features Enhanced WiFi M.2 Key-E Slot

Filed under
Linux

In the quest to make the Librem 14 our dream laptop we have focused not just on maxing out CPU resources, RAM, and security features, but we’ve also looked to expand the flexibility for hardware hackers to extend the laptop for their own projects.

As with our previous Librem laptops, on the Librem 14 WiFi and Bluetooth will be implemented as an M.2 add-on card which can also be removed completely (useful for those who want an “air gapped” computer). The M.2 slot follows the PCI M.2 specification for 2230 cards (22mm wide, 30mm long) key-E, i.e. the key used for WiFi, Bluetooth and other radio cards.

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Meet Karmbian, an ARM Linux Distro for Ethical Hackers Based on Kali Linux and Armbian

Filed under
Linux

Launched just a few days ago, Karmbian is a Kali Linux based distribution optimized for ARM devices, including single-board computers (SBC) like the Raspberry Pi and ROCK64, as well as ARM laptops like the PineBook Pro.

Being based on Kali Linux (formerly BackTrack), you can imagine that the whole purpose of the Karmbian project is provide ARM fans with a light and complete GNU/Linux distribution for ethical hacking and penetration testing.

Now you’ll ask yourselves, why not run Kali Linux directly on my ARM device? Well, the Karmbian explain that running Kali Linux on a SBC has not always been possible. That’s why Karmbian is also using the Armbian toolchain, a Debian and Ubuntu based computer operating system for ARM development boards.

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GTK 3.99

Filed under
GNOME

This week, we’re releasing GTK 3.99, which can only mean one thing: GTK4 is getting really close!

Back in February, when 3.98 was released, we outlined the features that we wanted to land before making a feature-complete 3.99 release. This was the list...

We’ve dropped animation API from our 4.0 blocker list, since it requires more extensive internal restructuring, and we can’t complete it in time. But all the other features have found their way into the various 3.98.x snapshots, with the accessibility infrastructure being the last hold-out that landed very recently.

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Also: GTK 3.99 Released With The GTK4 Toolkit Finally Close To Debut

Games Leftovers

Filed under
Gaming
  • With seamless 2D and 3D camera switching, Neko Ghost, Jump! is funded on Kickstarter

    Neko Ghost, Jump! is an upcoming indie platformer with a great twist that allows you to easily switch between 2D and 3D modes whenever you want - and you need to.

    This perspective switching is used to get around enemies, puzzles, see platforms you can only access in specific modes and more. It's actually quite amusing when in action and works really well. We've covered it before to mention it but more importantly now, it's been fully funded on Kickstarter with time to spare—thanks to them being given an extension to their end date by the Kickstarter team.

  • Changing your country on Steam has been made harder to battle VPNs

    Something that has been happening for years now, is that people have been switching around their country on Steam and using VPNs to get cheaper prices - Valve looks to have put a stop to it.

    Why was this a thing? Thanks to regional pricing, countries that typically have lower incomes can enjoy the same games as others with lower prices to match. Being able to get around that to buy cheaper games using a VPN was a bit of a loophole, which has been sorted by Valve.

    Spotted by SteamDB, It's not entirely clear when this actually went live for everyone. Checking it myself, changing country on Steam is now a bit more involved. After doing so, you then need to make a purchase from a payment method registered to that country.

  • Stoneshard has a small equipment patch while they rework the AI and Dungeons

    Ink Stains Games have announced that their Early Access and thoroughly challenging roguelike, Stoneshard, is set to get a huge overhaul to the AI and Dungeon Generation systems.

    This was actually announced back in June, with the team going over their plans for it. For the AI they want to make it a lot more complex to allow different behaviours between factions, add in new enemy types with unique abilities, better pathfinding, add random NPC encounters and a whole lot more. As for the Dungeon rework, they're looking to add lots of unique rooms to it, removing a bunch of plain mandatory hallways you might see and add new types of dungeons.

  • First-person roguelike RPG 'Barony' has a Steam sale, Free Weekend and an upgrade

    Turning Wheel are continuing to upgrade their first-person roguelike RPG 'Barony', with a fresh update available and you can try it free on Steam.

    While they just released it temporarily free onto the Epic Store, which doesn't support Linux, they have put it on a big discount on Steam along with a Free Weekend so you can see if you like it. Not only that, they also recently pushed out an update with the Hall of Trials update. This free expansion adds 10 challenges to teach players more of the game and perhaps test the knowledge of regulars too. Looks like a nice proper intro to the game mechanics.

  • Impressive 2D action-RPG 'Chronicon' leaves Early Access on August 21

    To say I enjoy Chronicon would be quite the understatement, this 2D indie action-RPG has a huge amount of content and it's finally set to leave Early Access.

    Subworld has announced on August 21, after 5 years in Early Access it's going to be considered a complete game. However they will be continuing to update it with free smaller content updates to keep it fresh, as well as paid DLC that include major additions.

  • Care for spirits of the deceased in Spiritfarer, new teaser released plus Stadia confirmed

    Spiritfarer, the upcoming game from Thunder Lotus Games that looks like it deals with death in quite a sweet way as you care for the spirits of the deceased has a new teaser trailer and more release info.

    Wait, what is it? Spiritfarer is a 'cozy management game about dying', where you play as the ferrymaster to the deceased. You get to farm, mine, fish, harvest, cook, and craft your way across mystical seas as you befriend and care for spirits before eventually releasing them carefully into the afterlife as you learn how to say goodbye to your cherished friends.

  • Underwater suffering simulator Barotrauma gets a much improved campaign mode

    In the latest update to Barotrauma, the alien-world underwater co-op submarine sim (and very much a suffering simulator), the teams at FakeFish and Undertow Games have given it a bit of an overhaul.

    This is the biggest update to the game so far, so likely worth a re-look if you bounced off it previously. It certainly sounds like they've been acting on a lot of the feedback I saw across reviews and forum posts. They said that you should now actually get a real sense or progression, especially in the campaign mode, which has been enhanced greatly with all sorts like: randomised outposts that you can actually explore, multi-step scripted events, NPCs to interact with instead of just menu after menu, bots can be hired in multiplayer and bots are persistent now, there's a brand new campaign map and loads more improvements. That is but the tip of the iceberg as lots more got overhauled including a bunch of the graphics, new decorative items and various bug fixes.

  • The 'living comic book' rogue-lite platformer Fury Unleashed arrives on GOG

    After your next crazy action-platformer fix? Fury Unleashed looks fantastic and it's recently been made available on GOG giving you another choice on your store.

    "Fury Unleashed was created by combining inspiration from modern roguelite platformers, like Dead Cells and Rogue Legacy, with nostalgic memories of old-school platformer shooters, like Contra and Metal Slug."

Qalculate! Desktop Calculator Brings Latest Version with Improvements

Filed under
News

Qalculate! the multi-functional GTK+ based desktop calculator released the latest version 3.12 with major features and improvements.
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Converting with GIMP

Filed under
GNU

In this tutorial you will learn to change format of photos with computer program GIMP. This means you can transform a picture from any format to JPEG, PNG, PSD, TIFF, BMP and many more. This includes making color photo into black and white too. Just like before, this tutorial also accompanied by a one minute video practicing it. Finally so you won't forget it, this tutorial is part of the GIMP for Authors the series. Enjoy editing!

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Also: Combining With GIMP

More in Tux Machines

Free Software and More

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 15 October 2021

    Happy Friday, everyone. The Apache community has had another great week.

  • The Intelligent Edge – Coming Soon to Arm DevSummit 2021 [Ed: What a ridiculous coredump of mindless buzzwords by SUSE]

    For those of us not keeping score, we’re at the cusp of a technology shockwave that will fundamentally change the way we live, work, and interact with each other. Some call it the fourth industrial revolution (I4). While the third industrial revolution was all about process and product automation, the fourth industrial revolution (from an IT perspective) will center on the fusion of IT and OT.

  • Five of Monday's 'All Things Open' Presentations We Wouldn't Miss - FOSS Force

    If you couldn’t make it to Raleigh, North Carolina to attend this year’s All Things Open, you’re in luck. You can go to the conference’s web site and register for the free online version of the event, which will include live streaming of all presentations happening at the event (including all keynotes), as well as a large number of prerecorded presentations that were put together specifically for the online audience. That’s how we at FOSS Force are planning on attending this year, although downtown Raleigh is only a couple of hours away by car.

  • Community Member Monday: Hlompho Mota

    I am a native of Lesotho, and a dreamer and a person who aspires to make changes. Currently I’m working in a business that serves other businesses in Lesotho to get recognition in the market, and generally grow to become more self-reliant. Other than my business, I do try and dabble in technology and try to understand how it works – and get a sense on how it can be relevant in the area of life that I live in at this moment. But besides that, I consider myself as lifelong learner and I hope that the learning will continue for the rest of my life. Currently, I’m a self-taught developer trying to participate in as many open-source projects as possible, with the hope of bringing much-needed development to my part of the world.

Programming Leftovers

  • Use KPNG to Write Specialized kube-proxiers

    The post will show you how to create a specialized service kube-proxy style network proxier using Kubernetes Proxy NG kpng without interfering with the existing kube-proxy. The kpng project aims at renewing the the default Kubernetes Service implementation, the "kube-proxy". An important feature of kpng is that it can be used as a library to create proxiers outside K8s. While this is useful for CNI-plugins that replaces the kube-proxy it also opens the possibility for anyone to create a proxier for a special purpose.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: dang 0.0.14: Several Updates

    A new release of the dang package arrived at CRAN a couple of hours ago, exactly eight months after the previous release. The dang package regroups a few functions of mine that had no other home as for example lsos() from a StackOverflow question from 2009 (!!), the overbought/oversold price band plotter from an older blog post, the market monitor from the last release as well the checkCRANStatus() function recently tweeted about by Tim Taylor. This release regroups a few small edits to several functions, adds a sample function for character encoding reading and conversion using a library already used by R (hence “look Ma, no new depends”), adds a weekday helper, and a sample usage (computing rolling min/max values) of a new simple vector class added to tidyCpp (and the function and class need to get another blog post or study …), and an experimental git sha1sum and date marker (as I am not the fan of autogenerated binaries from repos as opposed to marked released meaning: we may see different binary release with the same version number).

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.42 Learning With

    Daniel Sockwell was inspired by a blog post a few weeks ago about a bouncing balls demo. The result is a new framework for learning Raku, but this time with some nice graphics: Learn Raku With: HTML Balls. Apart from the technical points, it’s also a great way (for people without much programming experience) to get involved with Raku while creating graphics and animations, rather than textual output. Check it out!

  • Russ Allbery: rra-c-util 10.0

    It's been a while since I pushed out a release of my collection of utility libraries and test suite programs, so I've accumulated quite a lot of chanages. Here's a summary; for more, see the NEWS file.

  • 1.56.0 pre-release testing | Inside Rust Blog

    The 1.56.0 pre-release is ready for testing. The release is scheduled for this Thursday, October 21th. Release notes can be found here.

  • Apple Announces The M1 Pro / M1 Max, Asahi Linux Starts Eyeing Their Bring-Up

    Apple today announced the M1 Pro and M1 Max as their most powerful SoCs ever built by the company. The new chips feature up to a 10-core processor, 32-core GPU, and up to 64GB of unified memory. While the Apple M1 was already well regarded for its speed, the M1 Pro and M1 Max are said to deliver up to 70% faster CPU performance than last year's M1. Meanwhile the GPU within the M1 Pro is up to 2x faster than the M1 while the M1 Max's GPU is said to be 4x faster.

Mozilla Firefox: Spyware, Password Loggers, and Performance Monitoring

  • This Week in Glean: Designing a telemetry collection with Glean

    (“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean.) All “This Week in Glean” blog posts are listed in the TWiG index). Whenever I get a chance to write about Glean, I am usually writing about some aspects of working on Glean. This time around I’m going to turn that on its head by sharing my experience working with Glean as a consumer with metrics to collect, specifically in regards to designing a Nimbus health metrics collection. This post is about sharing what I learned from the experience and what I found to be the most important considerations when designing a telemetry collection. I’ve been helping develop Nimbus, Mozilla’s new experimentation platform, for a while now. It is one of many cross-platform tools written in Rust and it exists as part of the Mozilla Application Services collection of components. With Nimbus being used in more and more products we have a need to monitor its “health”, or how well it is performing in the wild. I took on this task of determining what we would need to measure and designing the telemetry and visualizations because I was interested in experiencing Glean from a consumer’s perspective.

  • Firefox Add-on Reviews: How to choose the right password manager browser extension

    All good password managers should, of course, effectively secure passwords; and they all basically do the same thing—you create a single, easy-to-remember master password to access your labyrinth of complex logins. Password managers not only spare you the hassle of remembering a maze of logins; they can also offer suggestions to help make your passwords even stronger. Fortunately there’s no shortage of capable password protectors out there. But with so many options, how to choose the one that’ll work best for you? Here are some of our favorite password managers. They all offer excellent password protection, but with distinct areas of strength.

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (September 2021)

    In September there were 174 alerts generated, resulting in 23 regression bugs being filed on average 6.4 days after the regressing change landed. Welcome to the September 2021 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 25 October 1300 UTC

    Please join us at the next regular Open NeuroFedora team meeting on Monday 25 October at 1300UTC in #fedora-neuro on IRC (Libera.chat). The meeting is a public meeting, and open for everyone to attend.

  • Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending October 16 - RTInsights

    In this week’s real-time analytics news: Red Hat announced updates in its portfolio of tools and programs for building applications on Red Hat OpenShift, and more. Keeping pace with news and developments in the real-time analytics market can be a daunting task. We want to help by providing a summary of some of the items our staff came across each week. Here are some of the news items from this week: Red Hat announced a series of updates in its portfolio of developer tools and programs for developers building applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The updates were to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift GitOps, and the Red Hat build of Quarkus. Additionally, Red Hat expanded the roster of training resources available on Kube By Example.

  • What I learned about Kubernetes and Knative Serverless

    If you happened to miss this year’s Kubernetes Summer Camp, there’s some good news! The sessions were recorded and are available for on-demand viewing. Along with those, you’ll also get access to a variety of downloadable content, including a free O’Reilly e-book.

  • Awards roll call: August to October 2021 [Ed: Those accolades and fake rewards/awards can easily be bought; they let you game the system for money]

    From workplace accolades to product wins, we are proud to be able to highlight some aspects of our company and the recognition they’ve received in the past few months. We recently published our DEI Statement, which declares our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion—not just for our associates, but for our partners, customers and open source contributors. Our culture is rooted in transparency, collaboration, and inclusion—open source principles that continue to drive our company forward. We see the following awards as a recognition of our open source-driven innovation, where the best ideas can come from anywhere and anyone.