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July 2020

7 Best Open Source “Disk Cloning/Backup” Tools for Linux Servers

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Disk cloning is the process of copying data from a hard disk to another one, in fact, you can do this process by copy & paste but you won’t be able to copy the hidden files and folders or the in-use files, that’s why you need a cloning software to do the job, also you may need the cloning process to save a backup image from your files and folders.

Basically, the cloning software job is to take all disk data, convert them into a single .img file and give it to you, so you can copy it to another hard drive, and here we have the best 7 Open Source Cloning software to do the job for you.

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Microsoft’s Edge browser is crashing if you have Google set as default search

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft’s new Edge browser started randomly crashing when users typed into the address bar tonight. The issues appear to have affected Edge users who have selected Google as the default search engine. Microsoft investigated the problem and now says it’s believed to have been resolved.

Microsoft recommends turning off Search Suggestions in edge://settings/search. The Verge has tested this workaround and it solves the problem if you have Google set as your default search engine.

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Why we open sourced our Python platform

Filed under
OSS

The team at Anvil recently open sourced the Anvil App Server, a runtime engine for hosting web apps built entirely in Python.

The community reaction has been overwhelmingly positive, and we, at Anvil, have already incorporated lots of that feedback into our next release. But one of the questions we keep getting asked is, "Why did you choose to open source such a core part of your product?"

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20 CentOS Server Hardening Security Tips – Part 1

Filed under
OS
Red Hat

This tutorial only covers general security tips for CentOS 8/7 which can be used to harden the system. The checklist tips are intended to be used mostly on various types of bare-metal servers or on machines (physical or virtual) that provide network services.

However, some of the tips can be successfully applied to general-purpose machines too, such as Desktops, Laptops, and card-sized single-board computers (Raspberry Pi).

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Also: 23 CentOS Server Hardening Security Tips – Part 2

CrowPi2 Raspberry Pi 4 Learning Kit Review – Part 1 – Unboxing and First Boot

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Last month, we wrote about Elecrow introducing CrowPi2 Raspberry Pi 4 laptop and electronics learning kit for its launch on Kickstarter crowdfunding website.

The company has now sent one of its kits to CNX Software for evaluation and review. I’ll start by checking out the content of the package, and boot it up, before publishing a more detailed review in a few weeks.

The package is fairly big and highlights it’s made for kids over 8 years old with close to 100 course resources and over 20 electronics modules.

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Linux Candy: Buoh – online strips comics reader

Filed under
Linux
OSS

Who loves eye candy? Don’t be shy — you can raise both hands!!

Linux Candy is a series of articles covering interesting eye candy software. We only feature open-source software in this series.

The subject of this article is Buoh. It’s an online comic strips reader that’s published under an open source license. It’s designed to bring a little light relief to your desktop. That sounds like a candidate for the Linux Candy series.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Conservancy Applies to Renew Key DMCA Exemption

    Conservancy has once again pushed for a renewal of the exemption to smart TV's, effectively allowing people to install and use free software on their own televisions. As part of a coalition with a group of researchers, our Executive Director, Karen Sandler also participated in filing the renewal application to continue the exemption for medical devices filed by the USC's Gould School of Law. Both of these exemptions must refiled in the triennial review process to ensure that interacting with the software in these devices does not become unlawful.

    In 2015 the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) was amended to expand the exemption process within the original sweeping 1998 legislation that criminalized many types of digital tinkering and improvements. The Copyright Office is tasked with soliciting and approving proposed exemptions to the law every three years to allow people to undertake non-infringing work on various devices. Many of the activities that are proscribed by the DMCA would hamper security research, interfere with commonplace after-market modifications to users' devices or preclude trivial repairs by laypeople without clearly described exemptions. Once renewals are filed, there is a period of time for oppositions to those renewals to be filed. As in the past, Conservancy has succeeded in explaining why the exemption for smart TVs is so important and we are ready to respond to any opposition now.

  • July GNU Spotlight with Mike Gerwitz: 22 new releases!

    adns-1.5.2
    binutils-2.35
    bison-3.7
    gama-2.09
    gcc-10.2.0
    gettext-0.21
    gnun-1.0
    gnunet-0.13.1
    gnupg-2.2.21
    guile-3.0.4
    help2man-1.47.16
    libextractor-1.10
    libgcrypt-1.8.6
    libidn-1.36
    linux-libre-5.7-gnu
    mcsim-6.2.0
    mpfr-4.1.0
    nano-5.0
    parallel-20200722
    shepherd-0.8.1
    tramp-2.4.4
    unifont-13.0.03

  • Redefining RHEL: Introduction to Red Hat Insights - 2020 Update

    In 2019, Red Hat announced that we were including Red Hat Insights with every Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) subscription. Now in 2020, we have expanded the capabilities that Insights includes and we wanted to take this opportunity to review what these expanded capabilities means to you, and to share some of the basics of Red Hat Insights.

    We wanted to make Red Hat Enterprise Linux easier than ever to adopt, and give our customers the control, confidence and freedom to help scale their environments through intelligent management.

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  • Upgrade to pip 20.2, plus, changes coming in 20.3

    On behalf of the Python Packaging Authority, I am pleased to announce that we have just released pip 20.2, a new version of pip. You can install it by running python -m pip install --upgrade pip.

    The highlights for this release are:

    - The beta of the next-generation dependency resolver is available -- please test
    - Faster installations from wheel files
    - Improved handling of wheels containing non-ASCII file contents
    - Faster pip list using parallelized network operations
    - Installed packages now contain metadata about whether they were directly requested by the user (PEP 376’s REQUESTED file)

  • Docs, Bugs, and Reports - Building SaaS #66

    In this episode, I created documentation for anyone interested in trying out the application. After documenting the setup, I moved on to fixing a bug with the scheduling display of courses. In the latter half of the stream, we focused on creating a new reports section to show progress reports for students.

    One of my patrons requested some documentation to explain how to get started with the project. We updated the README.md to show the commands that I use to set up my project. This includes virtual environment setup, package installation, Django bootstraping commands, and how to run the web server.

    After completing some documentation, we worked on a bug that my customer discovered during the last round of feedback that I collected from her. The problem was very specific to how courses would be displayed in the past. The customer wants to be able to hide courses that are complete, but still show past completed data. The existing implementation didn’t show the past. I wrote the unit test and made the code change to fix the issue.

    Finally, we started some new pages. The customer wants to see progress reports for students. I needed a new section that will display all the available reports in the future. I built a new ReportsIndexView that will be the new section for showing reports. We added the template view and started to put in context data.

  • KDE archive tool flaw let hackers take over Linux accounts [Ed: This is overhyped nonsense. Compressed files that are from unknown and malicious source have long been a risk and they're framed as a major hazard, sometimes because people unwittingly execute them.]

    A vulnerability exists in the default KDE extraction utility called ARK that allows attackers to overwrite files or execute code on victim's computers simply by tricking them into downloading an archive and extracting it.

    KDE is a desktop environment commonly found on Linux distributions that offers a graphical user interface to the operating system.

    Discovered by security researcher Dominik Penner of Hackers for Change, a path traversal vulnerability has been found in the default ARK archive utility that allows malicious actors to perform remote code execution by distributing malicious archives.

  • The Humble Double Fine 20th Anniversary Bundle is live with lots of games

    The weekend is quickly approaching and you're in need of some games? Seems Humble Bundle have you covered today with the launch of the Humble Double Fine 20th Anniversary Bundle.

  • Rocket League: The Epic Way

    When Epic bought Psyonix a while back, the writing was already on the wall. Soon after, Psyonix dropped the Linux and Mac versions of the game, and now, as the game becomes Free to Play, it has finally become what we all feared it would be: an Epic Store exclusive...

    [...]

    The sellouts at Psyonix, after building their success on the shoulders of the Steam community, ended up leaving for a poorer, anti-competitive, Windows-only platform.

Graphics: Wayland's Weston, NIR and AMD

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

           

  • Wayland's Weston Compositor Introduces Kiosk/Fullscreen Shell

    While there is already the Cage kiosk full-screen shell as well as the likes of Ubuntu's Mir Kiosk Shell, Wayland's Weston reference compositor now has its own implementation. 

    Collabora graphics developer Alexandros Frantzis has contributed "kiosk-shell" to Weston, Wayland's official reference compositor. The Kiosk Shell is a full-screen shell for applications making use of the XDG-Shell protocol. 

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  • Mike Blumenkrantz: Debugging

    It’s another hot one, so let’s cool down by checking out a neat bug I came across.

    As I’ve mentioned previously, zink runs a NIR pass to inject a gl_PointSize value into the last vertex processing stage of the pipeline for point draws. 

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  • ACO Radeon Shader Back-End Adds Unit Testing Framework To Help Test Optimizations

    The popular "ACO" shader compiler back-end that recently was promoted to the default shader compiler for Mesa's open-source Radeon Vulkan driver (RADV) has long been testing with shaders and traces while now a proper unit testing framework is being introduced for verifying optimizations are correctly handled, ensuring no regressions, etc. 

    ACO continues on a nice upward trajectory this year with being the default over AMDGPU LLVM for the RADV driver in Mesa 20.2, Valve continuing to fund the developers working on it, RadeonSI OpenGL driver support still being worked on, and various performance optimizations continuing. For helping to keep on that trajectory, today a unit testing framework was merged for ACO. 

More in Tux Machines

Games: Valve, Timberborn, and More

  • Valve launches Deck Verified, to show off what games will work well on the Steam Deck | GamingOnLinux

    We've been wondering what Valve had planned to show off Steam Deck compatibility for games and now they've launched Deck Verified as their answer. Valve say they are reviewing the entire Steam catalogue on the Steam Deck, with each of them gaining a category that it falls under that will show up across Steam from the store to your own Steam Library. The ratings will be split across Verified, Playable, Unsupported and Unknown. This is good because there's a lot of reasons why games will mix between perfect and unplayable on Steam Deck and the Arch Linux-based SteamOS it ships with.

  • Valve Launches "Steam Deck Verified" Program For Games That Run Well On The Steam Deck - Phoronix

    Valve is introducing a Steam Deck Verified system for helping gamers find out what games have been verified to work well on their forthcoming AMD+Linux-powered handheld game console.

  • VKD3D-Proton 2.5 Released With Experimental DXR 1.1, More Games Working - Phoronix

    VKD3D-Proton as Valve's Direct3D 12 over Vulkan implementation for Steam Play's Proton is out with a big feature update. VKD3D-Proton 2.5 brings experimental, opt-in support for DXR 1.1 ray-tracing. DXR 1.1 isn't yet fully implemented but does add inline ray-tracing support and other features. DXR 1.0 ray-tracing meanwhile is now considered effectively feature complete with VKD3D-Proton 2.5.

  • VKD3D-Proton v2.5 is out for Direct3D 12 on top of Vulkan, improving DirectX Raytracing | GamingOnLinux

    VKD3D-Proton is the project that translates Microsoft's Direct3D 12 to Vulkan, another big part of Steam Play Proton and there's a new release out. If you wish to know more about Steam Play and Proton do check out our dedicated section. A continued focus of VKD3D-Proton is bringing up support for DirectX Raytracing (DXR). As of this version 2.5 the developer notes that DXR 1.0 "is more or less feature complete". A few weird issues are left and eventually the config variable to enable it will be removed when it's stable enough. Further work went into improving DXR 1.1 and it's now experimentally exposed, with it being enabled by setting VKD3D_CONFIG=dxr11. They say that DXR 1.1 cannot be "fully implemented" just yet, although the feature support missing doesn't seem to currently be used by games. As of now DXR 1.1 inline raytracing is also fully implemented.

  • Timberborn: a cute beaver colony sim with an unrewarding late game

    The game only supports Windows. However, it runs excellently on Linux in Steam Proton compatibility mode.

  • Swarming RTS Age of Darkness: Final Stand is in Early Access and works great on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    Age of Darkness: Final Stand is like a fantasy version of They Are Billions, and compared with the latter it runs great on Linux thanks to Steam Play Proton. No native Linux version here but honestly it runs so well you can't tell the difference, it's click and play thanks to Proton and as such a massive fan of real-time strategy games I couldn't resist playing this one myself. Note: key provided by Team17. The world in Age of Darkness is one of constant fear. Darkness brings out Nightmares, strange hellish creatures with a taste for flesh and destruction. It's a constant battle of preparation. Right now it only has a survival mode, which sees you build up a village as you attempt to survive each night. All the traditional elements of a base-building RTS are here with population management, resource gathering, army building and more. A game very much for those of you who like "turtling", where you focus on building up a heavy defence.

  • Playing Deltarune: Chapter 2 natively on Linux | GamingOnLinux

    So, some time ago Toby Fox released the second chapter of the Deltarune series. Sadly, as was the case with the previous chapter, this one too comes without official Linux support. However, if the [HeartShapedObject] is willing, there is a way to play the game natively on Linux, albeit without official support. The trick is essentially the same as I described back in 2018 when the first chapter of Deltarune was released. Essentially, Deltarune is made with the GameMaker engine, and you can do a "port" of games like that as long as you can find a compatible GameMaker runner binary to pair up with the game data.

  • War Thunder is getting more terrain deformation in the upcoming 'Ground Breaking' upgrade | GamingOnLinux

    Ground Breaking is the name of the next major update for War Thunder and it sounds quite exciting, with some game engine upgrades to allow for more terrain interactions and deformation. Not only will you see huge craters left over from some of the more explosive ordinance, you will also be able to push around the ground. Soil, sand and snow will be movable with your tanks, allowing you with a little patience to create your own little protective barriers. That's right, self-entrenching is going to be a thing. In the Ground Breaking update the developers will add in a new animation for vehicles digging in.

  • Hugely popular mobile roguelike Shattered Pixel Dungeon is coming to Steam | GamingOnLinux

    For the PC release the developer now has a Steam page live and they've confirmed it will have a native Linux version.

Security Leftovers

Devices: Arduino Nano, HarmonyOS,and Pi

  • Arduino Nano Floppy Emulator For When Your Disk Is Not Accessible | Hackaday

    Among the plethora of obsolete removable media there are some which are lamented, but it can be difficult to find those who regret the passing of the floppy disk. These flexible magnetic disks in hard plastic covers were a staple of computing until some time in the early 2000s, and their drives could be found by the crateload in any spares box. But what about today, when there’s a need for a real floppy drive and none is to be found? Enter [Acemi Elektronikci], with an Arduino Nano based floppy emulator, that plugs into the floppy port of a PC old enough to have one, and allows the easy use of virtual floppy disks.

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  • HarmonyOS development board shows up for $11

    Last year, we noted the Hisilicon Hi3861 based HiSpark WiFi IoT development board with supports LiteOS and HarmonyOS that was available in China for just under $10, or as part of a devkit with baseboard and modules for around $60. Although not very practical, buying from Taobao was possible, but there’s now what appears to be a new revision of the Hi3861V100 based HarmonyOS development board in a wider form factor on Banggood for $10.99.

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  • Raspberry Pi CM4 handheld console looks like a Nintendo Switch Lite - CNX Software

    StonedEge and Dmcke5 have come up with an incredibly well-designed Raspberry Pi CM4 handheld console that looks like a Nintendo Switch Lite “clone”, and that can run Dreamcast and PSP emulators at full speed using RetroPie. The RetroLite CM4 The design includes a 5-inch display, speakers, all buttons, joysticks, and D-PAD controlled via a custom Arduino board, a micro HDMI port to connect an external display, and a 4000 mAh LiPo battery charged over the USB Type-C port, and it seems to work, albeit we are told there’s still some more work to do.

  • Lilbits: TCL’s concept smart glasses, PineNote E Ink tablet, and using the Raspberry Pi 400 as a keyboard
  • “Industrial Pi” Use Cases with Ubuntu and AMD

    DFI’s GHF51 mini industrial-grade motherboard, and the EC90A-GH mini fanless industrial computer, are the world’s first industrial computer products that have passed the Ubuntu IoT hardware certification and are equipped with high-performance AMD processors. The 1.8-inch motherboard of the Ryzen R1000 processor has the same small size as the Raspberry Pi but brings unprecedented powerful computing performance, powerful expansion capabilities, and durability tailored for industrial applications. Combining the online update mechanism of the Ubuntu Certified Hardware and the online application store, the breakthrough development of “Industrial Pi” will redefine the future of the Industrial Internet of Things. 

Audiocasts/Shows: WordPress, Linux Action News, Scams, and Fake Security

  • WP Briefing: Episode 18: The Economics of WordPress

    In episode 18 of WP Briefing, Josepha Haden Chomphosy reflects on a recent lecture that she gave to students at Hendrix College in which she explored the economics of WordPress and the principles that sustain the project’s ecosystem.

  • Linux Action News 211

    We cover what's special about Plasma's 25th-anniversary edition, chat with CloudLinux's CEO, and detail why Apple supporting Blender is good for all of us.

  • These Open Source SCAMMERS are getting out of control! - Invidious

    No, Inkscape isn't a scam. In fact, it's the best vector illustration tool on the planet. But, much like Krita just a few weeks ago, scammers have registered official-looking domains that are meant to trick people into downloading and installing ransomware. It's sad to see and I can't think of many ways we can combat this besides raising awareness.

  • Josh Bressers: Episode 293 – Scoring OpenSSF Security Scoring

    Josh and Kurt talk about the release of OpenSSF Security Scorecards version 3. This is a great project that will probably make a huge difference. Most of the things the scorecards are measuring are no brainier activities. We go through the list of metrics being measured. There are only a few that we don’t think are fantastic.