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July 2020

KDE Plasma 5 August 2020 release for Slackware

Filed under
KDE
Slack

New Plasma5 packages for Slackware-current are ready for download & installation. I skipped July (holiday season) and so here is KDE-5_20.08 aka my August 2020 release. Be sure to read the upgrade instructions very carefully to prevent breakage, because starting with my June batch the goal is to remove Slackware’s ConsoleKit2 and replace it with elogind!.

It would not harm if you (re-)read my previous blog article about Plasma5, “Replacing ConsoleKit2 with elogind – first steps“. It has a lot more detail about the reasons for this move as well as guidance on using the Wayland Window Manager (as a test) instead of regular X.Org. Note that Wayland sessions still need a lot of maturing and X.Org will remain Slackware’s default choice.

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IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat

Debian: Ben Hutchings, Chris Lamb, and Jonathan Carter

Filed under
Debian

  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, July 2020

    I was assigned 20 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative, but only worked 5 hours this month and returned the remainder to the pool.

    Now that Debian 9 'stretch' has entered LTS, the stretch-backports suite will be closed and no longer updated. However, some stretch users rely on the newer kernel version provided there. I prepared to add Linux 4.19 to the stretch-security suite, alongside the standard package of Linux 4.9. I also prepared to update the firmware-nonfree package so that firmware needed by drivers in Linux 4.19 will also be available in stretch's non-free section. Both these updates will be based on the packages in stretch-backports, but needed some changes to avoid conflicts or regressions for users that continue using Linux 4.9 or older non-Debian kernel versions. I will upload these after the Debian 10 'buster' point release.

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  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in July 2020

    As part of being on the board of directors of the Open Source Initiative and Software in the Public Interest I attended their respective monthly meetings and participated in various licensing and other discussions occurring on the internet, as well as the usual internal discussions regarding logistics and policy etc. This month, it was SPI's Annual General Meeting and the OSI has been running a number of remote strategy sessions for the board.

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  • Jonathan Carter: Free Software Activities for 2020-07

    Here are my uploads for the month of July, which is just a part of my free software activities, I’ll try to catch up on the rest in upcoming posts. I haven’t indulged in online conferences much over the last few months, but this month I attended the virtual editions of Guadec 2020 and HOPE 2020. HOPE isn’t something I knew about before and I enjoyed it a lot, you can find their videos on archive.org.

The Best Authenticator Apps for Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

If you have ever used two-factor authentication before, then you have probably heard of tools like Google Authenticator. To make use of many of these services, you’ll have to have your phone near you. Luckily, there are desktop authenticator apps that can provide you with the secret key you need to log in to your account. Below are the best authenticator apps for the Linux desktop.

[...]

Yubico works with a hardware security token known as the Yubikey. You can store your credentials on this as opposed to on your device. This hardware security token can even be further secured by choosing to unlock it with either FaceID or TouchID.

With Yubico, you will also be able to easily transition between devices, even after upgrading. The Yubico app lets you generate multiple secrets across devices, making it simple for you to switch.

I have to admit that the security offered by a physical token like the Yubikey is great. However, users must bear in mind that they must have the key with them if they wish to use two-factor authentication. I know you may argue and say this is no better than having to carry a phone with you. However, you can’t put your phone on a keychain! Additionally, it’s tough to crack a hardware token. Someone would have to steal it from you if they wanted to access your data. Even after doing that, they still won’t know any of your passwords or anything else of the sort.

With Yubico Authenticator, you first have to insert your key before you can add services to the app. After inserting your key, you can then add a security token from a service you want to enable two-factor authentication for. This is an app more for a power user due to the steps that must be taken to get it set up.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • oneAPI compatibility with all openSUSE

    As leader of the openSUSE Innovator initiative, openSUSE member and official oneAPI innovator, I tested the new release of the tool on openSUSE Leap 15.1, 15.2 and Tumbleweed. With the total success of the work, I made available in the SDB an article on how to install this solution on the openSUSE platform. More information here: https://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Install_oneAPI.

    oneAPI is an Unified, Standards-Based Programming Model. Modern workload diversity necessitates the need for architectural diversity; no single architecture is best for every workload. XPUs, including CPUs, GPUs, FPGAs, and other accelerators, are required to extract high performance.

    This technology have the tools needed to deploy applications and solutions across these architectures. Its set of complementary toolkits—a base kit and specialty add-ons—simplify programming and help developers improve efficiency and innovation. The core Intel oneAPI DPC++ Compiler and libraries implement the oneAPI industry specifications available at https://www.oneapi.com/open-source/.

  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the week 2020/31

    Week 31 has seen a steady flow of snapshots. The biggest snapshot was 0721, for which we had to do a full rebuild due to changes in the krb5 package, that moved some files around. In order for all packages to keep up with this change, the full rebuild was needed. The week in total has seen 7 snapshots being published (0721, 0724, 0726, 0727, 0728, 0729 and 0730)

  • Does Your Organization Need an Open Source Program Office?

    Every modern enterprise uses some open source software, or at the very least uses software that has open-source components. In an enterprise setting, the number of different open source projects an organization might use could easily be in the hundreds of thousands, and there could also easily be just as many engineers using those open source projects.

    While the reality is that enterprises use open source software, open source communities have a completely different culture — one focused on collaboration in a way that is foreign to most standard business environments.

    “As a business, it’s a culture change,” explained Jeff McAffer, who ran Microsoft’s Open Source Program Office for years and now is a director of product at GitHub focused on promoting open source in enterprises. “Many companies, they’re not used to collaboration. They’re not used to engaging with teams outside of their company.”

    What exactly are Open Source Program Offices (OSPOs)? What do they do, who needs them and why? We spoke with a couple of people who lead open source program offices to learn more.

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  • 50 Open Badges awarded for top LibreOffice translators!

    A few months ago, we announced Open Badges for LibreOffice contributors. These are custom images with embedded metadata, awarded to our most active community members to say thanks for their great work!

    The metadata describes the contributor’s work, and the badge can be verified using an external service. Open Badges are used by other free software projects, such as Fedora.

  • Ordering Browser Tabs Chronologically to Support Task Continuity

    Product teams working on Firefox at Mozilla have long been interested in helping people get things done, whether that’s completing homework for school, shopping for a pair of shoes, or doing one’s taxes. We are deeply invested in how we can support task continuity, the various steps that people take in getting things done, in our browser products. And we know that in our browsers, tabs play an important role for people carrying out tasks.

    [...]

    Fast forward to this year and the team working on Firefox for iOS was interested in how we might support task continuity involving leaving tabs open. We continued to see in user research the important role that tabs play in task continuity, and we wanted to explore how to make tab retrieval and overall tab management easier.

    In most web browsers on smartphones, tabs are ordered based on when a person first opened them, with the oldest tabs on one end of the interface (top, bottom, left, or right) and the newest tabs stacking to the opposite end of the interface. This ordering logic gets more complex if a new tab is prompted to open when someone taps on a link in an existing tab. A site may be designed to launch links in new tabs or a person may choose to open new tabs for links. The new tab, in that case, typically will open immediately next to the tab where the link was tapped, pushing all other later tabs toward the other end of the interface. All of this gets even trickier when managing more than just a few tabs. This brief demonstration illustrates tab ordering logic in Firefox for iOS before chronological tabs using the example of someone shopping for a good processor.

  • Tor’s Bug Smash Fund: Year Two!

    The Bug Smash Fund is back for its second year! In 2019, we launched Tor’s Bug Smash Fund to find and fix bugs in our software and conduct routine maintenance. Maintenance isn’t a flashy new feature, and that makes it less interesting to many traditional funders, but it’s what keeps the reliable stuff working--and with your support, we were able to close 77 tickets as a result.

    These bugs and issues ranged from maintenance on mechanisms for sending bridges via email and collecting metrics data to improving tor padding, testing, onion services, documentation, Tor Browser UX, and tooling for development. This work keeps Tor Browser, the Tor network, and the many tools that rely on Tor strong, safe, and running smoothly.

  • Say hello to the Linux Terminal 2.0 for Chrome OS

    Back in March, prior to the Chrome OS release calendar getting out of whack, the Linux terminal for Chrome OS was undergoing a major facelift that looked to be slated for the release of version 82. Since I generally live in the Canary channel, I was unaware that the update had not taken place. Instead, the refreshed Linux terminal actually arrived in the latest update to Chrome OS 84. Some of you reading this may be thinking “what the heck is a Linux terminal?” and that’s okay. Here’s a quick history lesson.

Linux Mint Monthly News and Ubuntu Leftovers

Filed under
Ubuntu

           

  • Linux Mint Monthly News – July 2020

    I’d like to thank you all for your support. Donations are usually quite high after a release and Linux Mint 20 is no exception. We received 924 donations in a single month! That’s quite an impressive number and it makes us feel really proud, both as a project and a community.

    Linux Mint 20 was well received but it introduced new challenges, both as a release and an upgrade. We’ll be focused on tackling these challenges for the next two years as well as implementing exciting refinements and new features in the upcoming point releases. Some of these are already listed on our Trello boards and roadmaps. I’d rather talk about them once they’re implemented and ready to be shipped though. Hopefully this time next month we’ll be able to give you a preview of some of them.

    In last month’s feedback we noted some users would like Linux Mint to package Chromium. We also observed confusion and lack of empowerment when it comes to dealing with foreign packages during the upgrade. These are two areas we’re looking into at the moment.

    LMDE 4 received many updates lately, including the new features from Linux Mint 20 and Cinnamon 4.6.

    A study on the popularity of Linux Mint releases showed some interested results and comforted some of the perception we had of our user base. 

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  • Charmed OSM Release EIGHT available from Canonical

    Canonical is proud to announce the general availability of OSM release EIGHT images in it’s Charmed OSM distribution. As of Release SEVEN, OSM is able to orchestrate containerised network functions (CNFs) leveraging Kubernetes as the underlying infrastructure for next-generation 5G services. Release EIGHT follows the same direction and brings new features that allow for the orchestration of a broader range of network functions and production environments.

    Open Source MANO (OSM) Release EIGHT is the result of great community work in a project that drives the most complete open source network function virtualisation (NFV) orchestrator in the market.

  • Full Circle Magazine #159

    This month:
    * Command & Conquer
    * How-To : Python, Podcast Production, and Rawtherapee
    * Graphics : Inkscape
    * Graphics : Krita for Old Photos
    * Linux Loopback
    * Everyday Ubuntu
    * Ubports Touch
    * Review : Ubuntu Unity 20.04
    * Ubuntu Games : Mable And The Wood
    plus: News, My Opinion, The Daily Waddle, Q&A, and more.

Hardware and Devices With Linux or Similar

Filed under
Hardware
  • Amazing science from the winners of Astro Pi Mission Space Lab 2019–20
  • What is an IoT-Ready PC?

    Can your PC or laptop handle IoT applications? This means it should have the ruggedness and extra connectivity support for IoT devices such as Arduino or Raspberry Pi, while supporting OS such as Windows 10 IoT Core.

  • The PongMate CyberCannon Mark III is a surefire way to never lose at beer pong

    If you participate in beer pong, and your skills aren’t up to the challenge, you might be in for a rough time. While “practice makes perfect,” if you’d rather shortcut this process then engineers Nils Opgenorth and Grant Galloway have just the solution with their Arduino-powered PongMate CyberCannon Mark III.

    This wrist-mounted launcher uses a time-of-flight sensor, along with an inertial measurement unit to calculate the vertical and horizontal distance to the red Solo cup, marked with a small laser. Bubble levels help users fix the device in the horizontal direction and five programmable RGB LEDs indicate when it’s ready to shoot.

  • BCM MX4305UE Industrial Mini-ITX Motherboard Features Intel Celeron 4305UE Processor

    The board supports both Windows 10 and Linux distributions.

  • Apollo Lake industrial mini-PC supports Linux

    Vecow’s Linux-ready, -40 to 75°C tolerant “SPC-4010C” industrial mini-PC is built around a dual-core Apollo Lake SoC with up to 8GB RAM, 2x GbE, SATA, HDMI, 4x USB, and 2x mini-PCIe with SIM card and mSATA.

    Vecow announced a minor revision to its Apollo Lake based SPC-4010 mini-PC called the SPC-4010C. If you already know about the SPC-4010, all you need to do is read the following paragraph. However, if like us, you are new to the SPC-4000 series, you may be interested in joining us for a brief tour of all six Apollo Lake based SPC-4000 models below. The fanless systems supports Linux and Win 10 for machine vision, robot control, infotainment, factory automation, intelligent control, and other compact AIoT applications.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • New Tax Collection Tech Replaces 50-Year-Old System

    Fried said recent updates to the old system had fallen mainly to a single employee who had worked for the office for most of the five decades the system had been in place - and finding another programmer with similar skills would have been challenging. The old system used the COBOL programming language and a traditional mainframe computer, whereas the new system is cloud-based and can be managed entirely remotely.

  • Call for Code Daily: tech for the disabled, chatbots, and the final push to submission close
  • Godot Release candidate: 3.2.3 RC 3

    Godot 3.2.2 was released on June 26 with over 3 months' worth of development, including many bugfixes and a handful of features. Some regressions were noticed after the release though, so we decided that Godot 3.2.3 would focus mainly on fixing those new bugs to ensure that all Godot users can have the most stable experience possible.

    Here's a third Release Candidate for the upcoming Godot 3.2.3 release. Please help us test it to ensure that no new regressions have slipped through code review and testing.

    Note: The previous 3.2.3 RC 2 was actually not built from the intended commit, and reflected the same changeset as RC 1. Tests made on RC 2 are still valid and useful, but did not help validate the very latest commits, hence this third release candidate. The changes new in this build are thus the ones made between RC 1 and RC 3.

  • What Is Fuzz Testing? A Guide.

    Not all software testing techniques have origin stories, but fuzz testing does: On a stormy evening in 1988, Barton Miller, a computer science professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was using a dial-up connection to work remotely on a Unix computer from his apartment. He was attempting to feed input information into a computer program, only to see the program repeatedly crash.

    He knew that the electrical noise from the thunderstorm was distorting his inputs into the program as they traveled through the phone line. The distorted inputs were different from what the software needed from the user, resulting in errors. But as he describes in his book, Fuzzing for Software Security Testing and Quality Assurance, Miller was surprised that even programs he considered robust were crashing as a result of the unexpected input, instead of gracefully handling the error and asking for input again.

    [...]

    Miller’s concern about what he saw during his thunderstorm experience extended beyond the annoyance of having applications crash unexpectedly. Applications that are not able to handle unexpected input also pose security concerns. Errors that aren’t handled by the program are vulnerabilities that attackers can exploit to hack into systems.

    In fact, attackers often use fuzz testing tools to locate vulnerabilities in applications, according to Jared DeMott, the CEO of VDA Labs security testing company and the instructor of several Pluralsight courses on testing.

    “If you follow what we call a secure development lifecycle… fuzzing is one piece of the lifecycle that relates to the testing portion of it,” DeMott said.

  • [Old] Infinite scrolling on the web is complexity layered on top of complexity layered on top of complexity

    Does all that stuff sound hard? Sorry, but it’s worse.

Games: GNOME, Core Defense, Steam and Monster Crown

Filed under
GNOME

  • Implementing Recently Played Collection in GNOME Games

    In my previous blog post, I talked about how I added a Favorites Collection to Games. Favorites Collection lists all the games that’s marked as favorite. In this post I’ll talk about what went into adding a Recently Played Collection, which helps you get to recently played games more quickly.

    Since most of the ground work for supporting non-user collections are already done as part of introducing Favorites Collection, it required much less work to add another non-user collection. For Recently Played collection, the main differences from Favorites Collection in terms of implementation are...

  • Core Defense offers up a different kind of Tower Defense with deck-building

    Core Defense is a Tower Defense game at it's core but it's quite unusual in how it sprinkles in the content and it's out now with full Linux support. After being in Early Access on itch.io for a few months, it's looking good.

    It takes the usual wave-based approach from your typical TD game but instead of giving you set tower types and specific placements, it's a little more open-ended. As you progress through the waves, you build up your defences based on what cards you pick as rewards, a little like a deck-builder and you use these unlocks to gradually build through the blank canvas of a map you're given.

  • 4 ways to back up Steam games on Linux

    Are you a Linux gamer? Do you play a lot of Steam video games? Trying to figure out how to back up your games so you don’t have to keep re-downloading them? If so, this list is for you! Follow along as we talk about 4 ways to back up Steam games on Linux!

  • Monster Crown has a new adult take on Pokemon and it's now in Early Access

    With a darker tone, a setting aimed at adults and creatures that might give a few pixelated nightmares, Monster Crown has entered Early Access as a new breed in the genre of monster catching.

    Monster Crown definitely captures some of the spirit of early Pokemon games, with a new and unique take on it. Instead of throwing a magical ball to capture creatures and force them to your will, Monster Crown gets you to offer them a contract and see if they want to join you. It's a little odd but an interesting spin.

More in Tux Machines

Kontron takes Raspberry Pi into Industry 4.0 with Codesys

“The integrated development environment Codesys for programmable logic controllers according to the IEC 61131-3 standards is hardware-independent software for application development in industrial automation,” according to Kontron. “Thanks to its open interfaces and security features, Codesys has distinguished itself as an industry 4.0 platform and facilitates data exchange between IIoT networks.” Prior to this, Codesys has been available for Kontron’s PiXtend – a similar product that takes a standard Pi rather than a Compute Module. Of this, the company said: Codesys V3 lets you memory-program controls. An integrated web visualisation tool is available for displaying your control elements, diagrams and graphics on your smartphone, tablet or PC.” Read more

Security: Windows, Microsoft Malware, GPS Bug, and Some Exaggeration/FUD

  • Sophisticated Spearphishing Campaign Targets Government Organizations, IGOs, and NGOs - blackMORE Ops

    The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) are engaged in addressing a spearphishing campaign targeting government organizations, intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). A sophisticated cyber threat actor leveraged a compromised end-user account from Constant Contact, a legitimate email marketing software company, to spoof a U.S.-based government organization and distribute links to malicious URLs.[1] CISA and FBI have not determined that any individual accounts have been specifically targeted by this campaign.

  • Malicious NPM Packages Caught Running Cryptominer On Windows, Linux, macOS Devices [Ed: Lousy anti-journalist sites try to blame the victims for having received malware from Microsoft itself]

    Three JavaScript libraries uploaded to the official NPM package repository have been unmasked as crypto-mining malware, once again demonstrating how open-source software package repositories are becoming a lucrative target for executing an array of attacks on Windows, macOS, and Linux systems.

  • GPS Daemon (GPSD) Rollover Bug

    Critical Infrastructure (CI) owners and operators, and other users who obtain Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) from Global Positioning System (GPS) devices, should be aware of a GPS Daemon (GPSD) bug in GPSD versions 3.20 (released December 31, 2019) through 3.22 (released January 8, 2021).

  • New Linux kernel memory corruption bug causes full system compromise [Ed: This is "local privilege escalation", i.e. vastly less severe than all those back doors in Windows, but so-called 'security' firms aren't meant to talk about state-mandated holes]

    Researchers dubbed it a “straightforward Linux kernel locking bug” that they exploited against Debian Buster’s 4.19.0.13-amd64 kernel.

today's howtos

  • Inspect the capabilities of ELF binaries with this open source tool

    Capa is an open source project from Mandiant (a cybersecurity company). In the project's own words, capa detects capabilities in executable files. Although the primary target of Capa is unknown and possibly malicious executables, the examples in this article run Capa on day-to-day Linux utilities to see how the tool works. Given that most malware is Windows-based, earlier Capa versions only supported the PE file format, a dominant Windows executable format. However, starting with v3.0.0, support for ELF files has been added (thanks to Intezer).

  • What you need to know about Kubernetes NetworkPolicy | Opensource.com

    With a growing number of cloud-native applications going to production through Kubernetes adoption, security is an important checkpoint that you must consider early in the process. When designing a cloud-native application, it is very important to embed a security strategy up front. Failure to do so leads to lingering security issues that can cause project delays and ultimately cost you unnecessary stress and money. For years, people left security at the end—until their deployment was about to go into production. That practice causes delays on deliverables because each organization has security standards to adhere to, which are either bypassed or not followed with a lot of accepted risks to make the deliverables. Understanding Kubernetes NetworkPolicy can be daunting for people just starting to learn the ins and outs of Kubernetes implementation. But this is one of the fundamental requirements that you must learn before deploying an application to your Kubernetes cluster. When learning Kubernetes and cloud-native application patterns, make your slogan "Don't leave security behind!"

  • 3 tips for printing with Linux

    I have a confession to make. This may be an unpopular opinion. I actually enjoy reading documents on a piece of paper as opposed to digitally. When I want to try a new recipe, I print it out to follow it so I don't have to continually swipe my mobile device to keep up with the steps. I store all my favorite recipes in sheet protectors in a binder. I also like to print out coloring pages or activity sheets for my kids. There are a ton of options online or we create our own! Though I have a fond appreciation for printed documents, I have also had my fair share of printing nightmares. Paper jams, low ink, printer not found, the list of frustrating errors goes on and on. Thankfully, it is possible to print frustration-free on Linux. Below are three tutorials you need to get started printing on Linux. The first article walks through how to connect your printer to your Linux computer. Then, learn how to print from anywhere in your house using your home network. The last article teaches you how to print from your Linux terminal so you can live out all your productivity dreams. If you are in the market for a new printer, check out this article about choosing a printer for Linux.

  • 3 basic Linux user management commands every sysadmin should know [Ed: But those have nothing to do with Linux… they’re part of shadow-utils.]

    I like logical commands; commands that are simple, straightforward, and just make sense. When I delivered Linux sysadmin training, I found Linux user management commands to be easy to explain.

  • Strange Apache Reload Issue « etbe - Russell Coker

    I recently had to renew the SSL certificate for my web server, nothing exciting about that but Certbot created a new directory for the key because I had removed some domains (moved to a different web server). This normally isn’t a big deal, change the Apache configuration to the new file names and run the “reload” command. My monitoring system initially said that the SSL certificate wasn’t going to expire in the near future so it looked fine. Then an hour later my monitoring system told me that the certificate was about to expire, apparently the old certificate came back! I viewed my site with my web browser and the new certificate was being used, it seemed strange. Then I did more tests with gnutls-cli which revealed that exactly half the connections got the new certificate and half got the old one. Because my web server isn’t doing anything particularly demanding the mpm_event configuration only starts 2 servers, and even that may be excessive for what it does. So it seems that the Apache reload command had reloaded the configuration on one mpm_event server but not the other!

  • Featured Unixcop Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) on CentOS 8 Oracle Data Integrator (ODI) on CentOS 8

    Data Integration ensures that information is timely, accurate, and consistent across complex systems. Although it is still frequently referred as Extract-Transform-Load (ETL), data integration was initially considered as the architecture used for loading Enterprise Data Warehouse systems. Data integration now includes data movement, data synchronization, data quality, data management, and data services. Oracle Data Integrator s built on several components all working together around a centralized metadata repository. Also these components – graphical modules, runtime agents and web based interfaces – in conjunction with other advanced features make ODI a lightweight, state of the art data integration platform. With its superior performance and flexible architecture, Oracle Data Integrator can_be used in various types of projects such as Data Warehousing, SOA, Business Intelligence or Application Integration.

  • Oracle Weblogic 14c on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Modern business environment demands Web and e-commerce applications that accelerate your entry into new markets like a boom ! help you find new ways to reach and retain customers, and allow you to introduce new products and services quickly. To build and deploy these new solutions, you need a proven, reliable e-commerce platform that can connect and empower all types of users while integrating your corporate data. Oracle WebLogic Server is a unified and extensible platform for developing, deploying and running enterprise applications, such as Java, for on-premises and in the cloud. Hi Guys ! Today, we will discuss about Oracle WebLogic server. We have got through some intro & now will have a glimpse of some architectural overview of this Oracle Middle ware product, Then we will go the how to’s. Don’t get bored till then ! WebLogic Server operates in the middle tier of a multi tier (or n-tier) architecture. A multi tier architecture determines where the software components that make up a computing system are executed in relation to each other and to the hardware, network, and users. Choosing the best location for each software component lets you develop applications faster; eases deployment and administration; and provides greater control over performance, utilization, security, scalability, and reliability.

  • Store Passwords Securely with Hashicorp Vault on Ubuntu 20.04 – VITUX

    It is always not possible to remember all the secret keys, passphrases, and tokens. Sometimes managing and maintaining secrets might be challenging tasks. We may need to store such secrets somewhere which we can use when needed. Hashicorp Vault is a solution that can be used to store secrets. It protects all the secrets stored on it and keeps secured. In this article, we will learn how to install Hashicorp vault on ubuntu 20.04.

Open Hardware/Modding: New Hardware Based on RISC-V and Arduino Projects

  • M5Stamp C3 RISC-V board supports WiFI 4, Bluetooth 5.0 Long Range and 2 Mbps bitrate - CNX Software

    It was only last month that M5Stack launched the M5Stamp Pico module based on an ESP32-PICO-D4 SiP and heat-resistant plastic shell, but M5Stamp C3 board is already out with most of the same specifications and features but an ESP32-C3 RISC-V SoC replaces the ESP32 dual-core Xtensa processor. M5Stamp C3 offers WiFi 4 and Bluetooth 5.0 with high bitrate and long-range connectivity and comes with the same heat-resistant plastic shell, but the company also highlights the RSA-3072-based secure boot and the AES-128-XTS-based flash encryption as a more secure way to address Bluetooth security concerns.

  • Alibaba open sources four RISC-V cores: XuanTie E902, E906, C906 and C910 - CNX Software

    Alibaba introduces a range of RISC-V processors in the last few years with the Xuantie family ranging from the E902 micro-controller class core to the C910 core for servers in data centers. This also includes the XuanTie C906 core found in the Allwinner D1 single-core RISC-V processor. While RISC-V is an open standard and there’s a fair share of open-source RISC-V cores available, many commercial RISC-V cores are closed source, but Zhang Jianfeng, President of Alibaba Cloud Intelligence speaking at the 2021 Apsara Conference, announced that T-Head had open-sourced four RISC-V-based Xuantie series processor cores, namely Xuantie E902, E906, C906, and C910, as well as related software and tools.

  • SiFive Has A New RISC-V Core To Improve Performance By 50%, Outperform Cortex-A78 - Phoronix

    SiFive just shared word that at today's Linley Conference they teased their Performance P550 successor that will "set a new standard for the highest efficiency RISC-V processor available."

  • This tinyML device counts your squats while you focus on your form | Arduino Blog

    Getting in your daily exercise is vital to living a healthy life and having proper form when squatting can go a long way towards achieving that goal without causing joint pain from doing them incorrectly. The Squats Counter is a device worn around the thigh that utilizes machine learning and TensorFlow Lite to automatically track the user’s form and count how many squats have been performed. Creator Manas Pange started his project by flashing the tf4micro-moition-kit code to a Nano 33 BLE Sense, which features an onboard three-axis accelerometer. From there, he opened the Tiny Motion Trainer Experiment by Google that connects to the Arduino over Bluetooth and captures many successive samples of motion. After gathering enough proper and improper form samples, Manas trained, tested, and deployed the resulting model to the board.