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August 2020

GNOME’s Sound Recorder App Has an Awesome New Look

Filed under
Software
GNOME

Avid users of the GNOME Sound Recorder application will be pleased to hear that the tool has finally received some overdue attention.

Developer Kavan Mevada worked on modernising the audio recording utility as part of this year’s Google Summer of Code (GSoC). Now, with the code-minded sprint over, Mevada shares an update on the progress he’s made — and is all I can say is wow!

Sound Recorders legacy codebase was ditched in favour of a ground-up, modern rewrite. Complimenting the streamlined foundation is a newer, cleaner, and more responsive UI designed according to GNOME’s Human Interface Guidelines (HIG).

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NVIDIA 450 Series Linux Driver OpenCL/CUDA/OptiX Performance On Pascal/Turing

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

With last week having delivered some current NVIDIA Linux gaming performance metrics ahead of the anticipated GeForce RTX 3000 "Ampere" series launch this week, here are some fresh compute metrics for those interested.

Following the tests last week looking at the OpenGL/Vulkan gaming performance, this article is simply providing some fresh OpenCL/CUDA/OptiX metrics for Pascal and Turing graphics cards on the very latest Linux driver. Ubuntu 20.04 LTS was used for all testing with the Linux 5.4 kernel and the NVIDIA 450.66 driver is the latest public driver as of testing time.

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LXD 4.5 has been released

Filed under
Linux
Server

The LXD team is very excited to announce the release of LXD 4.5!

This is another pretty busy release for LXD with the main highlight no doubt being the addition of OVN to our networking options.

On top of that, we have some welcome improvements to our container support with both the bpf syscall interception and the new allocation logic for pts devices.

And lastly, good improvements to clustering and to security with the improved remote storage work and the new AppArmor profiles.

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Escuelas Linux 6.10 Released with LibreOffice 7.0, Linux Kernel 5.8, and Jitsi Meet App

Filed under
Linux

The Escuelas Linux developer informs 9to5Linux today about the general availability of Escuelas Linux 6.10, a new important update to this Ubuntu/Bodhi Linux-based educational oriented distribution.

Escuelas Linux 6.10 comes about three months after Escuelas Linux 6.9 and it’s the first release to utilize the latest Linux 5.8 kernel series, which brings better hardware support. Therefore, Escuelas Linux should now run on newer hardware or work better on existing systems.

While Escuelas Linux 6.9 introduced the Zoom app for video conferencing, the new release includes another video conferencing app, namely the desktop version of Jitsi Meet, a free and open-source online video conferencing and instant messaging app to help you during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown.

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Blender 2.90 Open-Source 3D Creation Software Released with Major Changes

Filed under
Software

The Blender 2.90 free and open-source 3D creation software is now available for download and it’s a major update that digital artists and designers have been expecting for so long.

Highlights of Blender 2.90 include a new physically based texture called Nishita for simulating the colors of the sky, completely revamped motion blur in EEVEE with support for mesh deformation and hair for better precision, and faster motion blur via Intel Embree for ray tracing on the CPU.

There’s also a new shadow terminator offset setting that provides smooth shadows without shading artifacts, a new denoiser that can be used interactively in the 3D viewport, and NVLink support for NVIDIA CUDA and OptiX.

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IPFire Linux Firewall Now Ships with the IPFire Location Database

Filed under
Linux

IPFire 2.25 Core Update 148 is here as the monthly update you’ve been waiting for, replacing last month’s Core Update 147 release. But it’s not you regular maintenance update, but an important milestone in the history of the project.

Why? Because it’s the first release to ship with the brand-new IPFire Location project, an in-house built location database that replaces MaxMind’s GeoIP database and also provides some much-needed improvements.

With IPFire Location you’ll be able to better secure your firewall by analyzing the origin of attacks and blocking attackers from certain countries. You can also choose which servers can be accessed from certain locations, as well as to limit connections from a specific place.

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5 ways to convert video files on Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Need to convert a video file on your Linux PC? Can’t figure out which app to use to convert that video file from an MP4 to an AVI or another format? We can help! Follow along as we go over 5 ways to convert video files on Linux!

In this list, we went over 5 ways to convert video files on the Linux desktop. What conversion method do you think is the best? Let us know in the comments below!

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IPFire 2.25 - Core Update 148 released

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Security

This is the official announcement for the release of IPFire 2.25 - Core Update 148 - an update I have personally been waiting for: We finally roll out replacing Maxmind's GeoIP database by our own improved implementation.
As we have already pre-announced some time ago this side-project inside the IPFire Project is finally ready for prime time.

It comes with a new implementation to build, organise and access a highly optimised database packages with loads of helpful data for our firewall engines, as well as our analytics to analyse where attacks against the firewall are originating from.

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LXQt Review: A Lightweight, Extensible and Attractive Desktop Environment

Filed under
Reviews

Similarly to the w LXDE article, the user who should use LXQt is the user who is looking for the most performance out of the box at the expense of everything else. You may be on a system with limited RAM and CPU horsepower and looking to maximize your experience, or you may just value minimalism or simplicity over cohesion. Regardless, LXQt is a great choice.

Now that you’ve learned about LXQt, make sure to check out some of our other Desktop Environment reviews, including GNOME, KDE, Cinnamon and Xfce.

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More in Tux Machines

You Can Use Raspberry Pi 400 As a PC Keyboard and Mouse Combo

If you’re a fan of Pimoroni, you’re probably familiar with its software lead Phil Howard (aka Gadgetoid) and his developments in the Raspberry Pi community. Today we’re sharing an awesome project he put together using our favorite keyboard PC, the Raspberry Pi 400. Using the right cable and a bit of code, the Raspberry Pi 400 can function as a regular, USB HID keyboard. The best Raspberry Pi projects are easy to recreate and the only accessory you need to pull this project off is a USB Type-C to USB Type-A cable. Read more

today's leftovers

  • DearPyGui 1.0.0 user interface Toolkit Released - itsfoss.net

    Published edition Dear PyGui 1.0.0 (the DPG), a cross-platform toolkit for GUI development in Python. The most important feature of the project is the use of multithreading and outsourcing of operations to the GPU to speed up rendering. The key goal of shaping the 1.0.0 release is to stabilize the API. Compatibility-breaking changes will now be proposed in a separate “experimental” module. To ensure high performance, the bulk of the DearPyGui code is written in C ++ using the Dear ImGui library , designed for creating graphical applications in C ++ and offering a fundamentally different operating model. The Dear PyGui source code is licensed under the MIT license. Declared support for Linux, Windows 10 and macOS platforms.

  • Software testing - a 32-year-old message

    And then, after having tested hundreds of Linux distributions, thousands of applications, every release of Windows since 3.11, and then some, I can definitely say that the slow, steady erosion of professional testing in the software world is noticeable. And by that mean, in those scenarios it actually existed, because in some domains, it's never been there, and it shows. If anything, the longer I keep my hands on this or that application or program, the more I'm convinced that the new, casual approach to quality is simply not working. There will be a moment of reckoning.

  • Issue #373 - Robotic tickles

    We thought we’d lead with the weirdest Raspberry Pi-powered thing, purely because we couldn’t resist the bizarre visual. These robotic hands move according to actions taken on social media. And they’re creepy. We like creepy. Another robot from the blog this week can solve your Sudoku in seconds, and a hackathon-winning student project can photograph any object and automatically turn it into an NFT.

  • ODROID-H2+ SBC discontinued due to supply shortage - CNX Software

    Hardkernel has just discontinued ODROID-H2+ single board computer based on the Intel Celeron J4115 Gemini Lake Refresh processor, which followed ODROID-H2 SBC itself being discontinued shortly after Intel decided to phase out Intel J4105 and other Gemini Lake processors. The reason given is the “uncertain situation of main component supply”, which could mean Celeron J4115 processor is hard to get (or expensive), or the Realtek RTL8125B chipset provides 2.5GbE networking. That means Hardkernel does not offer any x86 SBC at this time. That’s a shame before ODROID-H2+ was a well-supported SBC running Linux or Windows, and great value for money at $119, especially for people interested in the two 2.5 Gbps Ethernet ports found on the board (and upgradeable to six), not to mention support for SO-DIMM memory and M.2 NVMe SSD.

  • Debian blocks VPN and Tor users from reading its Wiki. – BaronHK's Rants

    I understand that they don’t want VPN and Tor users messing up their Wiki anonymously, where it would be difficult to ban any one vandal, but to block people from even _reading it_ unless they unmask themselves is a bit heavy-handed. On Wikipedia, they block Tor and VPN users from editing, but you can read it all you want, and you can view the page’s source code if you are on a VPN. This is the right thing to do. I’m not sure why Debian is requiring us to de-anonymize ourselves just to read their Wiki. I wish that they would stop doing this.

  • Red Hat Announces Updates To Red Hat OpenShift And Red Hat Advanced Cluster Management For Kubernetes
  • How bare metal cloud is powering the telecommunications industry

    Bare metal clouds are gaining a lot of momentum in the telecommunications industry—but why? What is a bare metal cloud, and what are the benefits of using it? In this post, we answer these questions and more.

  • digiKam - digiKam Recipes 21.10.15 released

    It has been a while since the last update of digiKam Recipes. But that doesn’t mean I neglected the book. In the past few months, I’ve been doing a complete language review and adding new material. The new revision of digiKam Recipes features detailed information on how to move digiKam library and databases from one machine to another, how to access digiKam remotely from any machine, and how to import photos from an iOS device. The book now uses the Barlow font for better legibility along with a slightly improved layout.

  • October 2021 Web Server Survey [Ed: Microsoft became so irrelevant in Web servers that it is not even mentioned anymore and most tables don't even list Microsoft (it's miniscule, outside view)]

    In the October 2021 survey we received responses from 1,179,448,021 sites across 265,426,928 unique domains and 11,388,826 web-facing computers. This reflects a loss of 8.59 million sites, but a gain of 1.07 million domains and 20,800 computers. The number of unique domains powered by the nginx web server grew by 789,000 this month, which has increased its total to 79.5 million domains and its leading market share to 29.9%. Conversely, Apache lost 753,000 domains and saw its second-place share fall to 24.7%. Meanwhile, Cloudflare gained 746,000 domains – almost as many as nginx – but it stays in fourth place with an 8.15% share while OpenResty's shrank slightly to 14.5%. Cloudflare also made strong progress amongst the top million websites, where it increased its share by 0.24 percentage points to 18.2%. nginx is in second place with a 22.5% (+0.12pp) share but has closed the gap on Apache which still leads with 24.0% after losing 0.21pp. Apache also continues to lead in terms of active sites, where it has a total of 48.0 million. However, it was the only major vendor to suffer a drop in this metric, with a loss of 277,000 active sites reducing its share down to 23.9% (-0.29pp). In terms of all sites, nginx lost the most (-9.99 million) but remains far in the lead with a total of 412 million.

  • Chrome OS 94 Released - itsfoss.net

    The release of the operating system Chrome OS 94 has been published , based on the Linux kernel, the upstart system manager, the ebuild / portage build toolkit, open components and the Chrome 94 web browser . The user environment of Chrome OS is limited to a web browser, and instead of standard programs, web applications are used, however, Chrome OS includes a full-fledged multi-window interface, desktop and taskbar. Chrome OS 94 is available for most current Chromebooks. Enthusiasts have formed unofficial assemblies for ordinary computers with x86, x86_64 and ARM processors. Source texts are distributed under the free Apache 2.0 license.

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (squashfs-tools, tomcat9, and wordpress), Fedora (openssh), openSUSE (kernel, mbedtls, and rpm), Oracle (httpd, kernel, and kernel-container), SUSE (firefox, kernel, and rpm), and Ubuntu (linux-azure, linux-azure-5.4).

  • Apache Releases Security Advisory for Tomcat   | CISA

    The Apache Software Foundation has released a security advisory to address a vulnerability in multiple versions of Tomcat. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability to cause a denial of service condition.

  • Security Risks of Client-Side Scanning

    Even before Apple made their announcement, law enforcement shifted their battle for back doors to client-side scanning. The idea is that they wouldn’t touch the cryptography, but instead eavesdrop on communications and systems before encryption or after decryption. It’s not a cryptographic back door, but it still a back door — and brings with it all the insecurities of a back door. I’m part of a group of cryptographers that has just published a paper discussing the security risks of such a system. (It’s substantially the same group that wrote a similar paper about key escrow in 1997, and other “exceptional access” proposals in 2015. We seem to have to do this every decade or so.) In our paper, we examine both the efficacy of such a system and its potential security failures, and conclude that it’s a really bad idea.

  • The Open Source Security Foundation receives $ 10 million in funding - itsfoss.net

    The Linux Foundation has announced a $ 10 million commitment to the OpenSSF (Open Source Security Foundation), an effort to improve the security of open source software. Funds raised through royalties from parent companies of OpenSSF, including Amazon, Cisco, Dell Technologies, Ericsson, Facebook, Fidelity, GitHub, Google, IBM, Intel, JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Oracle, Red Hat, Snyk, and VMware …

Videos/Shows: Ubuntu 21.10, LHS, and Chris Titus

  • Ubuntu 21.10 - Full Review - Invidious

    Ubuntu 21.10 finally features the GNOME 40 desktop, better Wayland support, and more. In this video, I'll give you my thoughts on "Impish Idri" and we'll go over some of the new features. I'll talk about the installation process, Wayland changes,

  • LHS Episode #435: The Weekender LXXX

    It's time once again for The Weekender. This is our bi-weekly departure into the world of amateur radio contests, open source conventions, special events, listener challenges, hedonism and just plain fun. Thanks for listening and, if you happen to get a chance, feel free to call us or e-mail and send us some feedback. Tell us how we're doing. We'd love to hear from you.

  • Time to Rice and Make the Best Looking Desktop - Invidious

    We have our script that sets up the system... now we make our script to automatically make our desktop the best looking one out there!