Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

February 2021

Open Hardware/Modding: RISC-V in Linux 5.12, Arduino, and Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4

Filed under
Hardware
  • RISC-V With Linux 5.12 Begins Mainlining SiFive's FU740 Support, NUMA - Phoronix

    Notable with RISC-V in Linux 5.12 is initial support for the SiFive FU740, the SoC design announced at the end of last year. The most notable major user coming to market at the moment with the FU740 is the HiFive Unmatched development board. The SoC with its quad-core U74-MC and single S7 embedded core is joined by four USB 3.2 Gen 1 ports, PCI Express x16 (at x8 speeds), NVMe M.2, Gigabit Ethernet, and 16GB of RAM to make for the most interesting RISC-V development board to date. The HiFive Unmatched is slated to still begin shipping later this quarter for about $665 USD.

  • Arduino Blog » Putting a modern spin on the phenakistoscope

    The phenakistoscope was invented in the 1800s as a way to view a series of moving pictures on a spinning disc. While the traditional implementation is ingenious in its own right, Nick Lim has created his own take on this venerable concept, using strobing light to break up frames instead of the slits-and-mirror arrangement of the original.

    His system utilizes a repurposed CD-ROM BLDC motor to rotate the discs — which feature phenakistoscope patterns that were printed out and pasted on top — and an overhead array of strobing LEDs to make the images come to life.

  • Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 industrial carrier board supports M.2 NVMe SSD, 4G LTE modem

    Since the Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 launch last fall, we’ve seen several interesting carrier boards for the system-on-module including Wiretrustee to build a NAS with up to four SATA drives, the compact, Arduino-sized Piunora board that also include an M.2 socket, or Over:Board mini-ITX carrier board.

    Oratek brings another one specially designed for industrial use cases with TOFU Raspberry Pi Compute Module 4 carrier board offering wide DC input, Gigabit Ethernet with PoE, M.2 NVMe SSD or 4G LTE modem support, among many other features.

GNU Projects: GNU Inetutils, libredwg, and assembly

Filed under
GNU
  • GNU Inetutils 2.0 Is Released - LinuxReviews

    The GNU Project is "pleased" to announce Inetutils 2.0. This is the first release of the GNU implementations of many commonly used Internet utilities such as ping, ftp, hostname, ifconfig and telnet in six years.

    [...]

    The GNU inetutils contain implementations of a lot of the common network-related utilities found on modern GNU/Linux distributions. Some of the same programs it provides are implemented by the completely different net-tools package and some are implemented by the also very different iputils package. The ping, hostname and ifconfig implementations your favorite GNU/Linux distribution may or may not be provided by GNU inetutils.

    The previous version of GNU inetutils was released on June 10th, 2015. The first version mentioned in the changelog of inetutils-1.3a (the oldest version available for download at the GNU Project), which doesn't have a number, was released on December 30, 1995. A common/version.c was added the following year.

  • libredwg-0.12.3 released

    Add llvmfuzz and oss-fuzz integration, fixed many minor fuzzing errors. libfuzzer is much better than afl++ and honggfuzz.

  • Tips for writing portable assembler with GNU Assembler (GAS)

    Writing assembly code is straightforward when you are familiar with the targeted architecture’s instruction set, but what if you need to write the code for more than one architecture? For example, you might want to test whether a particular assembler feature is available, or generate an object file for use with another tool. Writing assembly source code that can work on multiple architectures is not so simple.

    This article describes common types of problems encountered when working with assembly code, and the techniques to overcome them. You will learn how to address problems with comments, data, symbols, instructions, and sections in assembly code. To get you started, the Portable assembler demo source file provides many examples of GNU Assembler (GAS) assembly code. I’ll use a few of the examples in this article.

    [...]

    This article addressed common problems writing portable assembly code and provided solutions and examples. In summary, writing portable assembler is hard to do and best kept simple, and persistence is the key.

Get Better Remote Sessions on Linux With Mosh and Tmux

Filed under
GNU
Linux

One of Linux’s strengths is its orientation toward networking, which is largely due to its Unix heritage. There’s a reason why Linux is an operating system of choice for servers.

The main way to remotely access Linux servers is through SSH, or Secure Shell. While it’s useful and secure, it was designed in an era before Wi-Fi and cellular connections became commonplace.

If you move your computer to a different Wi-Fi network or put it to sleep, you might find yourself disconnected with an apparently frozen terminal screen.

Read more

Mozilla: Rust, Firefox Logo, Nightly, Surveillance and VR/Hubs

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Const generics MVP hits beta!

    After more than 3 years since the original RFC for const generics was accepted, the first version of const generics is now available in the Rust beta channel! It will be available in the 1.51 release, which is expected to be released on March 25th, 2021. Const generics is one of the most highly anticipated features coming to Rust, and we're excited for people to start taking advantage of the increased power of the language following this addition.

    Even if you don't know what const generics are (in which case, read on!), you've likely been benefitting from them: const generics are already employed in the Rust standard library to improve the ergonomics of arrays and diagnostics; more on that below.

    With const generics hitting beta, let's take a quick look over what's actually being stabilized, what this means practically, and what's next.

  • Remain Calm: the fox is still in the Firefox logo

    If you’ve been on the internet this week, chances are you might have seen a meme or two about the Firefox logo.

    And listen, that’s great news for us. Sure, it’s stressful to have hundreds of thousands of people shouting things like “justice for the fox” in all-caps in your mentions for three days straight, but ultimately that means people are thinking about the brand in a way they might not have for years.

    People were up in arms because they thought we had scrubbed fox imagery from our browser. Rest easy knowing nothing could be further from the truth.

    The logo causing all the stir is one we created a while ago with input from our users. Back in 2019, we updated the Firefox browser logo and added the parent brand logo as a new logo for our broader product portfolio that extends beyond the browser.

  • django-querysetsequence 0.14 released!

    django-querysetsequence 0.14 has been released with support for Django 3.2 (and Python 3.9). django-querysetsequence is a Django package for treating multiple QuerySet instances as a single QuerySet, this can be useful for treating similar models as a single model. The QuerySetSequence class supports much of the API available to QuerySet instances.

  • Firefox Nightly: These Weeks in Firefox: Issue 88
  • Will Kahn-Greene: Data Org Working Groups: retrospective (2020)

    Data Org architects, builds, and maintains a data ingestion system and the ecosystem of pieces around it. It covers a swath of engineering and data science disciplines and problem domains. Many of us are generalists and have expertise and interests in multiple areas. Many projects cut across disciplines, problem domains, and organizational structures. Some projects, disciplines, and problem domains benefit from participation of other stakeholders who aren't in Data Org.

  • Mozilla VR Blog: Behind-the-Scenes at Hubs Hack Week

    Earlier this month, the Hubs team spent a week working on an internal hackathon. We figured that the start of a new year is a great time to get our roadmap in order, do some investigations about possible new features to explore this year, and bring in some fresh perspectives on what we could accomplish. Plus, we figured that it wouldn’t hurt to have a little fun doing it! Our first hack week was a huge success, and today we’re sharing what we worked on this month so you can get a “behind the scenes” peek at what it’s like to work on Hubs.

Wine 6.3

Filed under
Software

The Wine development release 6.3 is now available.

What's new in this release (see below for details):
  - Better debugger support in the NT syscall interface.
  - WineGStreamer library converted to PE.
  - Still more WinRT support in WIDL.
  - Optional support for build IDs.
  - Various bug fixes.

The source is available from the following locations:

  https://dl.winehq.org/wine/source/6.x/wine-6.3.tar.xz
  http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/wine/source/6.x/wine-6.3.tar.xz

Binary packages for various distributions will be available from:

  https://www.winehq.org/download

You will find documentation on https://www.winehq.org/documentation

You can also get the current source directly from the git
repository. Check https://www.winehq.org/git for details.

Wine is available thanks to the work of many people. See the file
AUTHORS in the distribution for the complete list.

Read more

Also: Wine 6.3 Released With Several Low-Level Improvements

Tor-Based OnionShare 2.3 File Sharing Tool Gets Tabs, Anonymous Chat, and Dedicated CLI Version

Filed under
Software

More than a year in the works, OnionShare 2.3 is finally here as the next major update to this awesome tool for anonymously sharing files or hosting websites as an onion service, and now also for anonymously chatting with friends or family, thanks to the end-to-end encrypted (E2EE) OnionShare chat room feature.

The anonymous chat feature is so securely implemented that it leaves almost no traces. For starters, nothing is logged when you’re anonymously chatting in an OnionShare chat room, and your messages aren’t stored anywhere. And secondly, you don’t have to create an account to use the OnionShare chat room, so your email address isn’t exposed to hackers or spammers.

Read more

Games: Godot, Cyanide & Happiness, CrossCode and More

Filed under
Gaming
  • Why isn't Godot an ECS-based game engine?

    The topic of why Godot does not utilize ECS comes up often, so this article will explain the design decisions behind that, as well as shed some light on how Godot works.

    [...]

    Godot uses plenty of data oriented optimizations for physics, rendering, audio, etc. They are, however, separate systems and completely isolated.

    Most (if not all) technologies that utilize ECS do it at the core engine level, by serving as the base architecture and building everything else (physics, rendering, audio, etc) over it.

    Godot instead, those subsystems are all separate and isolated (and fit inside of servers). I find this makes code simpler and easier to maintain and optimize (a testament to this is how tiny Godot codebase is compared to other game engines, while providing similar amounts of functionality).

    The scene system in Godot (nodes) is generally very high level when compared to a traditional ECS system. Most of what goes on happens via signal callbacks (as in, objects collided, something needs to be repainted, button was pressed, etc). The situations where something needs to be processed every frame in Godot from the user side are very rare, as the engine will manage this internally, taking the complexity away from the user.

    In other words, Godot is an engine tries to take the burden of processing away from the user, and instead places the focus on deciding what to do in case of an event. This ensures users have to optimize less in order to write a lot of the game code, and is part of the vision that Godot tries to convey on what should constitute an easy to use game engine.

  • Cyanide & Happiness - Freakpocalypse gets a release date with Linux support due in April

    Cyanide & Happiness - Freakpocalypse, the upcoming comedy point and click adventure game from Explosm, Skeleton Crew Studios and Serenity Forge finally gets a release date. On March 11, 2021 it will release for Windows and with the Linux / macOS releases being readied up for release slightly later in April as the publisher confirmed to us on Twitter and in their latest Kickstarter update.

  • CrossCode: A New Home expansion is out now | GamingOnLinux

    Ready for the next chapter of Lea's story? CrossCode: A New Home is the brand new expansion for CrossCode the retro-inspired 2D Action RPG set in the distant future.

    A pretty surprising game overall that combines a 16-bit SNES-inspired style with lots of modern features. Smooth physics, fast-paced combat, plenty of puzzles to solve and a pretty wild sci-fi story that you can now continue on from the end of the main game in CrossCode: A New Home. To enjoy it, you need to have finished the original game as this does take place right after and you need specifically the "good ending" apparently.

  • Deckbuilding gets psychological in Neurodeck - out March 18 | GamingOnLinux

    The publisher has confirmed to us that Linux will be supported at release. We're hoping to take a look at this one and we do have a key request in for it. Once it's out and we've had some time with it, we'll let you know if it's any good.

  • Terraria for Google Stadia is surprisingly back on and going through certification | GamingOnLinux

    Turns out Terraria for Stadia will still be a thing. After what looked like it would never happen due to Re-Logic co-creator having their Google account locked, Terraria is now going through certification to release for Stadia. It was part of a pattern of bad news for Google's fledgling cloud gaming service, following shortly after Google shut down their first-party Stadia studios and more recently a class action lawsuit so things really weren't looking good in the eyes of many.

IBM/Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Red Hat OpenShift 4.7 Streamlines Application Modernization

    Red Hat OpenShift 4.7 includes the latest version of OpenShift Virtualization. First released in July 2020, OpenShift Virtualization is designed to help organizations break down application barriers between traditional and cloud-native infrastructure and extend control over distributed resources.

  • How I became a Kubernetes maintainer in 4 hours a week

    I have heard (and even said) versions of this sentiment many times since Kubernetes started gaining influence. So, over the last year, I've spent time contributing to the project, and I've found it worth every minute.

    I've discovered that Kubernetes is a project with the right scale for anyone to make an impact in whatever time they have available in their schedule. For me, that was just four hours a week. No more, no less.

    After six months at four hours a week, I found myself the leader of a subgroup that's making a significant difference around non-code contributions to the project.

    I'll share some of what I've learned about contributing to Kubernetes. I hope it helps you find the focus and time to join in.

  • Fedora Community Blog: Friday’s Fedora Facts: 2021-08

    Here’s your weekly Fedora report. Read what happened this week and what’s coming up. Your contributions are welcome (see the end of the post)! The Beta freeze is underway.

    I have weekly office hours on Wednesdays in the morning and afternoon (US/Eastern time) in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else. See the upcoming meetings for more information.

  • Advancing the organization towards hyper versatility and perpetual innovation

    Digital innovation has rarely been more important than it became in 2020, when COVID-19 moved much of the world virtual. In our previous two posts, we discussed what shapes digital innovation and how critical it is in underpinning the business. In this post, we'll discuss the building blocks for digital innovation.

  • 2021 is the year that open source overcomes its diversity problems [Ed: Racist and sexist company has decided to pose or pretend to be the opposite of what it really is.]

    As the 2020 StackOverflow survey pointed out, technology companies — and many open source communities — have a diversity problem. While the majority of developers currently come from a white, male background, the momentum is shifting to create more inclusive, diverse communities.

    Research shows that diverse open source projects are more productive and make better decisions. This starts with creating teams that have a greater representation of gender, race, socioeconomic standings, ethnic backgrounds, and the like.

    Many open source communities are recognizing the need for new initiatives and a cohesive focus to tackle the lack of diversity in their projects. I predict that in 2021, building off the momentum of this past year’s focus on social inequality and steps made by open source-minded companies and foundations, open source communities will continue to increase the diversity of their communities so that it becomes the rule and not the exception.

    [...]

    As noted, communities need to actively work to remove barriers to increasing diversity. Here are a few examples of such efforts. Some of these are by IBM — which I of course have the most insight into — but this goes far beyond us. I believe we need to see more of these everywhere!

today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Duf – A Better Linux Disk Monitoring Utility [Ed: Overlooks the point that df generally works fine and isn't locked away in Microsoft's besiegement and proprietary software (GitHub) occupation against Free software]

    duf is one of the fancy Linux disk monitoring utilities written in Golang. It is released under MIT license and It supports Linux, macOS, BSD, and even Windows too.

  • Sysadmin university: Quick and dirty Linux tricks | Enable Sysadmin

    Add these quick and dirty tricks to your sysadmin toolbox for some special Linux magic.

  •  

  • Navigate your FreeDOS system

    FreeDOS is an open source implementation of DOS. It's not a remix of Linux, and it is compatible with the operating system that introduced many people to personal computing. This makes it an important resource for running legacy applications, playing retro games, updating firmware on motherboards, and experiencing a little bit of living computer history. In this article, I'll look at some of the essential commands used to navigate a FreeDOS system.

    [...]

    FreeDOS can be very different from what you're used to if you're used to Windows or macOS, and it can be just different enough if you're used to Linux. A little practice goes a long way, though, so try some of these on your own. You can always get a help message with the /? switch. The best way to get comfortable with these commands is to practice using them.

  • How To Install KVM on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install KVM on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) is the virtualization solution for Linux. It consists of a loadable kernel module that allows the Linux Kernel to work as a Hypervisor. KVM provides hardware-assisted virtualization for a wide variety of guest operating systems.

    This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the KVM virtualization on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  •   

  • How to Activate Incognito Mode for Private Browsing on Linux

    Private browsing is the easiest way of hiding your browsing history on a computer. Almost every browser now comes with an option that allows you to switch to incognito browsing. But if you're fairly new to Linux, finding a decent browser that lets you browse the internet privately becomes hard.

    Let's explore more about what private browsing actually means, along with some detailed information on how to browse privately on Linux.

  • How to Copy a Folder in Linux With cp

    Need to copy a Linux folder in the command line? Here's how to copy one or more folders with the cp command.

  • How to Restore Clonezilla Backups to Different Partitions - Make Tech Easier

    Clonezilla is a popular software for you to clone your hard disk. However, if you tried to restore a specific partition’s backup to a new HDD that you’d already set up, Clonezilla might have refused to do it. It might have insisted on auto-selecting different partitions and not allowing you to choose where you want your backup restored.

    In this guide, we show how to restore your Clonezilla backup to a different partition of your choice (not its choice).

  • Installing Nagios on Centos 7 - The Linux Juggernaut

    Nagios is an extremely popular open source monitoring and alerting tool. The name nagios is an offshoot of an older system called ‘net saint’. Although Nagios has it’s limits and is not an all in one solution but provides a considerable feature set nonetheless. The monitoring platform is available in two variants: Nagios core which is the open source and free variant and Nagios XI which is the enterprise version. In this article we will demonstrate step by step how to install the latest version of Nagios core on a Centos 7 system.

  • Installing Nagios on Centos 7 part 3 (Nagios configuration) - The Linux Juggernaut

    In our previous two articles we’ve explained how to install Nagios core on a Centos 7 system and how to install Nagios plugin and the Nagios Remote Plugin Executor. In this article we will explain how to configure Nagios so that we can have the web interface up and running. Note that this needs to be done only once on the Nagios server. You may make amendments as deemed necessary.

  • SFTP, FTPS, and SCP - What's the Difference? - Putorius

    All of these protocols are used for transferring files. However, they all provide file transfers in a different manner. Which one to use depends greatly on your requirements functionality, and even operating system used. In this article we will discuss how each of these protocols work, their limitations, strengths, and examples of their use. Let’s take a look at the differences between SFTP, SCP, and FTPS.

  • Nagios installation on Centos 7 part 2 (installing plugins and NRPE) - The Linux Juggernaut

    In our previews article we walked you through installing nagios core on a Centos 7 system. In this article we will explain how to install Nagios plugins and the Nagios Remote Plugin Executor (NRPE) package.

  • Monitoring a Remote Centos 6 server with Nagios core - The Linux Juggernaut

    In our earlier articles on nagios we explained in detail how to install nagios core on the centos 6 system and configure it. In this article we will explain step by step how to monitor a remote machine with nagios core.

  • Ubuntu: increase swap [Guide]

    When installing Ubuntu, a swap file is created. The swap file is usually about 2 GB, though sometimes it can be larger. This swap file can do the trick for most Ubuntu users these days, as most modern PCs have a lot of performance and RAM.

    If you rely on swap a lot on Ubuntu because you’re regularly using up your physical RAM, the 2-4 GB swap file isn’t enough. Thankfully, it is possible to increase the swap’s size from the default to something much larger.

  • Ubuntu: update kernel [Guide]

    If you’ve used Ubuntu long enough, you’ll notice that the Linux kernel doesn’t often get updated to a new release. Usually, the Ubuntu developers push out point releases until the next new Ubuntu release.

Mageia 8 Released with Linux 5.10 LTS, Better Support for NVIDIA Optimus Laptops

Filed under
Linux

Mageia 8 is powered by the long-term supported Linux 5.10 LTS kernel series, promising outstanding hardware support, and in combination with an up-to-date graphics stack consisting of Mesa 20.3.4 and X.Org Server 1.20.10, the distribution offers improved support for AMD and NVIDIA GPUs.

For newer AMD Radeon GPUs, Mageia 8 uses the open-source AMDGPU graphics driver, while the Radeon graphics driver is used for older cards. On the other hand, the free Nouveau graphics driver is used for NVIDIA GPUs, and Mageia 8 promises improved support for NVIDIA Optimus laptops.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Free Software and More

  • The Apache News Round-up: week ending 15 October 2021

    Happy Friday, everyone. The Apache community has had another great week.

  • The Intelligent Edge – Coming Soon to Arm DevSummit 2021 [Ed: What a ridiculous coredump of mindless buzzwords by SUSE]

    For those of us not keeping score, we’re at the cusp of a technology shockwave that will fundamentally change the way we live, work, and interact with each other. Some call it the fourth industrial revolution (I4). While the third industrial revolution was all about process and product automation, the fourth industrial revolution (from an IT perspective) will center on the fusion of IT and OT.

  • Five of Monday's 'All Things Open' Presentations We Wouldn't Miss - FOSS Force

    If you couldn’t make it to Raleigh, North Carolina to attend this year’s All Things Open, you’re in luck. You can go to the conference’s web site and register for the free online version of the event, which will include live streaming of all presentations happening at the event (including all keynotes), as well as a large number of prerecorded presentations that were put together specifically for the online audience. That’s how we at FOSS Force are planning on attending this year, although downtown Raleigh is only a couple of hours away by car.

  • Community Member Monday: Hlompho Mota

    I am a native of Lesotho, and a dreamer and a person who aspires to make changes. Currently I’m working in a business that serves other businesses in Lesotho to get recognition in the market, and generally grow to become more self-reliant. Other than my business, I do try and dabble in technology and try to understand how it works – and get a sense on how it can be relevant in the area of life that I live in at this moment. But besides that, I consider myself as lifelong learner and I hope that the learning will continue for the rest of my life. Currently, I’m a self-taught developer trying to participate in as many open-source projects as possible, with the hope of bringing much-needed development to my part of the world.

Programming Leftovers

  • Use KPNG to Write Specialized kube-proxiers

    The post will show you how to create a specialized service kube-proxy style network proxier using Kubernetes Proxy NG kpng without interfering with the existing kube-proxy. The kpng project aims at renewing the the default Kubernetes Service implementation, the "kube-proxy". An important feature of kpng is that it can be used as a library to create proxiers outside K8s. While this is useful for CNI-plugins that replaces the kube-proxy it also opens the possibility for anyone to create a proxier for a special purpose.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: dang 0.0.14: Several Updates

    A new release of the dang package arrived at CRAN a couple of hours ago, exactly eight months after the previous release. The dang package regroups a few functions of mine that had no other home as for example lsos() from a StackOverflow question from 2009 (!!), the overbought/oversold price band plotter from an older blog post, the market monitor from the last release as well the checkCRANStatus() function recently tweeted about by Tim Taylor. This release regroups a few small edits to several functions, adds a sample function for character encoding reading and conversion using a library already used by R (hence “look Ma, no new depends”), adds a weekday helper, and a sample usage (computing rolling min/max values) of a new simple vector class added to tidyCpp (and the function and class need to get another blog post or study …), and an experimental git sha1sum and date marker (as I am not the fan of autogenerated binaries from repos as opposed to marked released meaning: we may see different binary release with the same version number).

  • Rakudo Weekly News: 2021.42 Learning With

    Daniel Sockwell was inspired by a blog post a few weeks ago about a bouncing balls demo. The result is a new framework for learning Raku, but this time with some nice graphics: Learn Raku With: HTML Balls. Apart from the technical points, it’s also a great way (for people without much programming experience) to get involved with Raku while creating graphics and animations, rather than textual output. Check it out!

  • Russ Allbery: rra-c-util 10.0

    It's been a while since I pushed out a release of my collection of utility libraries and test suite programs, so I've accumulated quite a lot of chanages. Here's a summary; for more, see the NEWS file.

  • 1.56.0 pre-release testing | Inside Rust Blog

    The 1.56.0 pre-release is ready for testing. The release is scheduled for this Thursday, October 21th. Release notes can be found here.

  • Apple Announces The M1 Pro / M1 Max, Asahi Linux Starts Eyeing Their Bring-Up

    Apple today announced the M1 Pro and M1 Max as their most powerful SoCs ever built by the company. The new chips feature up to a 10-core processor, 32-core GPU, and up to 64GB of unified memory. While the Apple M1 was already well regarded for its speed, the M1 Pro and M1 Max are said to deliver up to 70% faster CPU performance than last year's M1. Meanwhile the GPU within the M1 Pro is up to 2x faster than the M1 while the M1 Max's GPU is said to be 4x faster.

Mozilla Firefox: Spyware, Password Loggers, and Performance Monitoring

  • This Week in Glean: Designing a telemetry collection with Glean

    (“This Week in Glean” is a series of blog posts that the Glean Team at Mozilla is using to try to communicate better about our work. They could be release notes, documentation, hopes, dreams, or whatever: so long as it is inspired by Glean.) All “This Week in Glean” blog posts are listed in the TWiG index). Whenever I get a chance to write about Glean, I am usually writing about some aspects of working on Glean. This time around I’m going to turn that on its head by sharing my experience working with Glean as a consumer with metrics to collect, specifically in regards to designing a Nimbus health metrics collection. This post is about sharing what I learned from the experience and what I found to be the most important considerations when designing a telemetry collection. I’ve been helping develop Nimbus, Mozilla’s new experimentation platform, for a while now. It is one of many cross-platform tools written in Rust and it exists as part of the Mozilla Application Services collection of components. With Nimbus being used in more and more products we have a need to monitor its “health”, or how well it is performing in the wild. I took on this task of determining what we would need to measure and designing the telemetry and visualizations because I was interested in experiencing Glean from a consumer’s perspective.

  • Firefox Add-on Reviews: How to choose the right password manager browser extension

    All good password managers should, of course, effectively secure passwords; and they all basically do the same thing—you create a single, easy-to-remember master password to access your labyrinth of complex logins. Password managers not only spare you the hassle of remembering a maze of logins; they can also offer suggestions to help make your passwords even stronger. Fortunately there’s no shortage of capable password protectors out there. But with so many options, how to choose the one that’ll work best for you? Here are some of our favorite password managers. They all offer excellent password protection, but with distinct areas of strength.

  • Mozilla Performance Blog: Performance Sheriff Newsletter (September 2021)

    In September there were 174 alerts generated, resulting in 23 regression bugs being filed on average 6.4 days after the regressing change landed. Welcome to the September 2021 edition of the performance sheriffing newsletter. Here you’ll find the usual summary of our sheriffing efficiency metrics. If you’re interested (and if you have access) you can view the full dashboard.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

  • The NeuroFedora Blog: Next Open NeuroFedora meeting: 25 October 1300 UTC

    Please join us at the next regular Open NeuroFedora team meeting on Monday 25 October at 1300UTC in #fedora-neuro on IRC (Libera.chat). The meeting is a public meeting, and open for everyone to attend.

  • Real-time Analytics News for Week Ending October 16 - RTInsights

    In this week’s real-time analytics news: Red Hat announced updates in its portfolio of tools and programs for building applications on Red Hat OpenShift, and more. Keeping pace with news and developments in the real-time analytics market can be a daunting task. We want to help by providing a summary of some of the items our staff came across each week. Here are some of the news items from this week: Red Hat announced a series of updates in its portfolio of developer tools and programs for developers building applications on Red Hat OpenShift. The updates were to Red Hat OpenShift Pipelines, Red Hat OpenShift GitOps, and the Red Hat build of Quarkus. Additionally, Red Hat expanded the roster of training resources available on Kube By Example.

  • What I learned about Kubernetes and Knative Serverless

    If you happened to miss this year’s Kubernetes Summer Camp, there’s some good news! The sessions were recorded and are available for on-demand viewing. Along with those, you’ll also get access to a variety of downloadable content, including a free O’Reilly e-book.

  • Awards roll call: August to October 2021 [Ed: Those accolades and fake rewards/awards can easily be bought; they let you game the system for money]

    From workplace accolades to product wins, we are proud to be able to highlight some aspects of our company and the recognition they’ve received in the past few months. We recently published our DEI Statement, which declares our commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion—not just for our associates, but for our partners, customers and open source contributors. Our culture is rooted in transparency, collaboration, and inclusion—open source principles that continue to drive our company forward. We see the following awards as a recognition of our open source-driven innovation, where the best ideas can come from anywhere and anyone.