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February 2021

Databases: MySQL and PostgreSQL Technical Manuals (New)

Filed under
Server
  • How to Install MySQL on Linux Mint 20 and Ubuntu 20.04?

    MySQL is an open-source, simple, and relational database that uses SQL (Structured Query Language) to manage and manipulate the data.

  • MySQL Add a Column to Existing Table

    MySQL Database System is a highly scalable database service for creating cloud-native applications. Therefore we have to perform different operations while working on it. The ALTER TABLE declaration is being cast-off to add, remove, or alter columns while working on an already existing table in any schema of MySQL. We’ll teach you exactly how to declare a column to an existing table utilizing the MySQL ADD COLUMN expression in this guide.

  • MySQL Count Matching Records With COUNT

    Data redundancy occurs for a lot of reasons. Several of the complicated duties you should cope with while working with database systems is trying to discover duplicate values. For this purpose, We will be using the COUNT() aggregate method. The COUNT() method returns the sum of rows residing in a specific table. The COUNT() function permits you to sum all rows or only rows matching the condition defined. In this guide, You’ll get to know how to identify duplicate values for one or maybe more MySQL columns using COUNT().

  • MYSQL Import Data from CSV File – Linux Hint

    A CSV or comma-separated value document is a delineated text document that distinguishes values from a comma. Every line is its information record. Each data, parted by commas, comprises one or extra fields. The origin of the title for this document layout is the usage of the comma as a field divider. For sharing information between various programs, such documents are used. For instance, Database and contact administrators also endorse CSV files. The theory is that from one program to a CSV document, you may transfer complex information and afterward import the information in that CSV document to some other program. In this tutorial, we will learn how to import data from a CSV file into MySQL workbench. Let’s get started.

  • MYSQL Find Matching Records with LIKE – Linux Hint

    The MySQL LIKE operator tests if a particular character string resembles the pattern mentioned. We will match a portion of the overall data present in a segment that doesn’t need to match precisely. We will cup tie our keyword with the sequence of the information available in columns by using wildcard query in various combinations. MySQL Wildcards are symbols that help match difficult criteria with search results and have been used in combination with a compare operator called LIKE or a contrast operator called NOT LIKE.

  • MySQL Limit Results Returned With LIMIT – Linux Hint

    You eventually hit the stage where data volume greatly increases when we start to deal with DBMS like MySQL. It is difficult for us to manage and use. MySQL has built-in capabilities that make it easy to handle. In MySQL, the LIMIT clause is being used to cut down the number of rows throughout the result set using the SELECT expression. We will discover how to use the MySQL LIMIT clause in this guide to restrict the number of rows that a query returns.

  • MySQL Sort Results with ORDER BY Statement – Linux Hint

    While working with MySQL queries, the results are obtained in the same sequence as the records inserted into the schema utilizing the SELECT command. It’s the standard order for sorting. You would be aiming at how we might arrange our query result. Sorting is re-arranging the outputs of our query in a defined manner. Sorting may be done on one field or more than one field. The ORDER BY statement is being used to arrange the query results in an ascending or descending order in MySQL. The ORDER BY statement organizes data by default in go-up order if ASC or DESC is not specified. The DESC term is being used to organize the data in descending way.

  • MySQL Subqueries – Linux Hint

    A subquery is a SQL query within a greater query that is recursive, or a subquery is considered an internal query. In contrast, an outer query is termed as the query that includes the subquery. A MySQL subquery can be embedded in the queries, including SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, or DELETE. Furthermore, within another subquery, a subquery may be nestled. The phrase subquery should be closed in brackets wherever it is used. We’ll teach you how and when to use MySQL subquery to compose complicated queries and describe the idea of the associated subquery. Open the command-line shell from your desktop and write your password to start using it. Press Enter and continue.

  • PostgreSQL FAQs – Linux Hint

    According to StackOverflow’s 2020 Annual Developer Survey, PostgreSQL is the second most popular database management system available, and this is not without good reason. Since its initial release in 1996, PostgreSQL, or Postgres, has improved considerably, adding several useful features, including user-defined types, table inheritance, multi-version concurrency control, and more.
    PostgreSQL is also very lightweight, easy to set up, and can be installed on several platforms, such as containers, VMs, or physical systems. Besides its default GUI, pgAdmin, Postgres also supports over 50 other IDEs, a third of which are free to use. This article will cover some of the most frequently asked questions (FAQs) about PostgreSQL.

9to5Linux Weekly Roundup: February 28th, 2021

Filed under
News

This has been a great week of Linux news and releases. We saw lots of goodies, including Kali Linux’s first ISO release in 2021 with the latest Xfce 4.16 desktop environment, a new Firefox release, a new Nitrux release, Xfce’s apps update for February, and more good things from the upcoming GNOME 40 desktop environment.

If you missed this week’s most important Linux news, distro and software releases, you can catch up with what’s new in the 9to5Linux Weekly Roundup for February 28th below.

Read more

Roman Gilg: Curious Child

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

Last week we studied window children on X11 and Wayland at a high level. With this general knowledge acquired, we will quickly go through the recent changes to window children in KWinFT's new version.

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today's howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to configure a static IP address on Fedora? – Linux Hint

    IP address configuration is one of the normal tasks system administrators do on a System.
    IP address is used for identifying a device on a network. There are basically two types of IP addresses: 1) Public 2) Private. We can further divide these IP addresses into IPv4 and IPv6.

    By default, Fedora uses DHCP-provided IP addresses when it is connected to a DHCP server. We can use the below methods to use static IP addressing and other networking options like vlans, bonds, bridges, teams, etc.

  • How to Install and Configure Git on Fedora? – Linux Hint

    Git is one of the popular Distributed Version Control Systems (DVCS) among programmers. It lets you manage the incremental changes you make to your code. We can also easily revert to the earlier version of a code. Multiple developers can work simultaneously on the same project. Team members can see the changes to a project, message associated with the changes, their collaborators, project timeline, progress of the work, etc.

  • How to install Sheep It Render Farm on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Sheep It Render Farm on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How do I Upgrade my Linux Kernel Version on Debian 10? – Linux Hint

    The kernel in Linux acts as a bridge to enable communication between software/applications and your machine’s hardware. It acts as the backbone of your operating system upon which the normal processing of all your system functions is based. That is why it is always good to keep it updated and upgraded regularly. In today’s article, we will be exploring the procedure of upgrading our Linux kernel version on Debian 10.

  • Best Debian 10 Netstat Alternative – Linux Hint

    The Socket Statistics, or ‘ss,’ command has replaced the netstat command through its incorporation of the iproute suite of tools. Using the ss command, a user can print all the relevant information about network socket connections more quickly and with more detail than the netstat command. The netstat command approach is also slower because it collects information from reading the /proc files, and it takes a significant amount of time to display several network connections at once. Meanwhile, the ss command directly collects information from kernel space. Even so, the options that are used with ss command are quite similar. So, you can easily use the ss command as an improved alternative for the netstat command.
    This article covers the usage of the ss command with some straightforward examples. All the commands shown in this article were executed on the Ubuntu 20.04 distribution to check the statistics of socket and network connections.

  • How to Create a WiFi Hotspot in Linux Mint 20 – Linux Hint

    The WiFi Hotspot allows us to connect the same and heterogeneous devices wirelessly to the Internet. Using the WiFi Hotspot, files can be easily shared with other devices. In this guide, you will learn how to create a WiFi Hotspot in Linux Mint 20.

    [...]

    Creating the WiFi Hotspot is a very easy and straightforward process on Linux Mint 20. By creating the WiFi Hotspot, we can easily share the files with the other system connected to the same network. This guide explains the WiFi Hotspot creation on Linux Mint 20.

Jamie McClelland: From openbox to sway

Filed under
GNU
Linux

I've been running the Openbox window manager since 2005. That's longer then I've lived in any one apartment in my entire life!

However, over the years I've been bracing for a change.

It seems clear the Wayland is the future, although when that future is supposed to begin is much more hazy.

Really, I've felt a bit like a ping pong ball, from panicking over whether Xorg is abandoned to anxiously wondering if literally everything will break the moment I switch to Wayland.

In fact, I started this blog post over a year ago when I first decided to switch from the Openbox to Sway.

This is my third major attempt to make the change and I think it will finally stick this time.

In retrospect, it would have been more sensible to first switch from openbox to i3 (which is a huge transition) and then from i3 to sway, but I decided to dive into the deep end with both changes.

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Meet The Lightweight PC And Mac OS You Probably Didn’t Know About

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The wonderful world of Linux and open source never fails to surprise me. Even as immersed as I try to be, there’s always some new discovery around the corner. Case in point: I always assumed that Raspberry Pi OS was only intended for, you know, a Raspberry Pi. But recently I learned that the company makes a special version called Raspberry Pi Desktop, and you can install it on any traditional x86-based PC. Even an Apple Mac.

Raspberry Pi devices are built with low-power ARM processors and only 1GB to 4GB of RAM, and so the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s in-house operating system for the Single-Board Computers is lightweight. It’s designed to run smoothly on the entire Raspberry Pi lineup.

Most traditional PCs built within the last 15 years rock x86 CPUs from Intel and AMD. And as we know, most of those x86 computers run Windows while a smaller percentage run macOS.

Now, Windows 10 isn’t exactly lightweight. If you bought or built your PC during the Windows Vista or Windows 7 days, chances are high that it no longer meets the hardware requirements to adequately run Windows 10.

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Also: Raspberry Pi Powered LCD Chalkboard Smart Sign – Makers Corner, with Nate and Yannick

Security: Reproducible Builds, VPNs, COMB and More

Filed under
Security
  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in February 2021

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, therefore allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

    [...]

    I also made the following changes to diffoscope, including preparing and uploading versions 167 and 168 to Debian...

  • Here's why VPN services are turning to WireGuard

    When it comes to VPN services, everyone has their individual preferences, and the same is true of the protocols used to encrypt them.

    OpenVPN and IPsec encryption protocols have long ruled the roost, but up-and-coming protocol WireGuard is proving that high levels of encryption can be had for less overhead.

    We caught up with Daniel Sagi, COO at Kape Technologies, parent company of Private Internet Access, to find out about the value WireGuard can deliver and the company's approach to protocols going forward.

  • COMB: largest breach of all time leaked online with 3.2 billion records

    It’s being called the biggest breach of all time and the mother of all breaches: COMB, or the Compilation of Many Breaches, contains more than 3.2 billion unique pairs of cleartext emails and passwords. While many data breaches and leaks have plagued the internet in the past, this one is exceptional in the sheer size of it. To wit, the entire population of the planet is at roughly 7.8 billion, and this is about 40% of that.

    However, when considering that only about 4.7 billion people are online, COMB would include the data of nearly 70% of global internet users (if each record was a unique person). For that reason, users are recommended to immediately check if their data was included in the leak. You can head over to the CyberNews personal data leak checker now.

  • Create Your Own Certificate Authority (CA) for Homelab Environment

    I use my own Root CA to manage certificates in the homelab environment.

Videos/Shows: ImageMagick, GNU World Order, and This Week in Linux (TWIL)

Filed under
GNU
Linux

  • Import: ImageMagick Can Even Take Screenshots - YouTube

    ImageMagick is a really cool image processing application but it can do so much more than most people realize, one of these things is taking screenshots, even though it's not the most convenient tool to do so it's here to use if you want less stuff taking up space on your linux system.

  • gnuWorldOrder_395

    Musings about community and choice in Linux and open source.

  • This Week in Linux 140: Red Hat RHEL For FREE, Kali Linux, GNOME 40, Modular Laptops, DIY N64 ROMs | This Week in Linux - TuxDigital

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we’ve got some updates for Red Hat’s CentOS and RHEL topic that is still making waves. We’ve also got a lot of distro releases this week from Mageia, Kali Linux, and one of the smallest distros around, Tiny Core Linux. GNOME has announced the beta release of GNOME 40 so there’s a lot to talk about there. Then we’ll check out a new exciting modular laptop that has been announced. Later in the show, we’re going to check out the latest release of Mozilla’s Firefox and a really cool hardware project from the RetroArch team. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

Flameshot 0.9 Released with Global Shortcut Menu, Improved Wayland Support

Filed under
Software

Flameshot, the popular screenshot software, released version 0.9.0 with great new features!

Flameshot 0.9.0 adds new global shortcut menu in configuration dialog. All actions hotkeys are fully customizable.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Snapcraft Clinic Successes

    On Thursday I mentioned we were restarting the Snapcraft Clinic. Basically we stand up a regular video call with engineers from the snap and snapcraft team & us from Snap Advocacy. Developers of applications and publishers of snaps are invited to join to troubleshoot.

    There was nothing especially secret or private discussed, but as we don’t record or stream the calls, and I don’t have direct permission to mention the applications or people involved, so I’ll keep this a little vague. In future I think we should ask permission and record the outcomes of the calls.

    We had a few productive discussions. One developer brought an application which they’d requested classic confinement for, and wished to discuss the options for confinement. We had a rather lengthy open discussion about the appropriateness of the available options. The developer was offered some choices, including making changes to their application to accomodate confinement, and another was (as always) not to snap the application. They appreciated our openness in terms of accepting that there are limitations with all software, and not everything always makes sense to be packaged as a snap, at the moment.

    We also had a productive discusison with a representative of a group responsible for publishing multiple snaps. They had difficulties with a graphical snapped application once it had been updated to use core20. The application would launch and almost immediately segfault. As the application was already published in the Snap Store, in a non-stable channel, we were all able to install it to test on our own systems.

  • Kraft Version 0.96

    Ich freue mich, heute das Release Version 0.96 von Kraft herauszugeben. Die neue Version kann über die Homepage heruntergeladen werden.

  • A new data format has landed in the upcoming GTG 0.5

    Diego’s changes are major, invasive technological changes, and they would benefit from extensive testing by everybody with “real data” before 0.5 happens (very soon). I’ve done some pretty extensive testing & bug reporting in the last few months; Diego fixed all the issues I’ve reported so far, so I’ve pretty much run out of serious bugs now, as only a few remain targetted to the 0.5 milestone… But I’m only human, and it is possible that issues might remain, even after my troll-testing.

    Grab GTG’s git version ASAP, with a copy of your real data (for extra caution, and also because we want you to test with real data); see the instructions in the README, including the “Where is my user data and config stored?” section.

    Please torture-test it to make sure everything is working properly, and report issues you may find (if any). Look for anything that might seem broken “compared to 0.4”, incorrect task parenting/associations, incorrect tagging, broken content, etc.

  • MAS ‘Ocean strainer’ technology to be open source

    Inspired by the success of its ‘Ocean Strainer’ floating trash trap, a pilot project launched in the Dehiwala Canal last year, MAS Holdings will make the ‘Ocean Strainer’ technology available to interested parties, to replicate and scale up the solution.

  • Notes on Addressing Supply Chain Vulnerabilities

    One of the unsung achievements of modern software development is the degree to which it has become componentized: not that long ago, when you wanted to write a piece of software you had to write pretty much the whole thing using whatever tools were provided by the language you were writing in, maybe with a few specialized libraries like OpenSSL. No longer. The combination of newer languages, Open Source development and easy-to-use package management systems like JavaScript’s npm or Rust’s Cargo/crates.io has revolutionized how people write software, making it standard practice to pull in third party libraries even for the simplest tasks; it’s not at all uncommon for programs to depend on hundreds or thousands of third party packages.

    [...]

    Even packages which are well maintained and have good development practices routinely have vulnerabilities. For example, Firefox recently released a new version that fixed a vulnerability in the popular ANGLE graphics engine, which is maintained by Google. Both Mozilla and Google follow the practices that this blog post recommends, but it’s just the case that people make mistakes. To (possibly mis)quote Steve Bellovin, “Software has bugs. Security-relevant software has security-relevant bugs”. So, while these practices are important to reduce the risk of vulnerabilities, we know they can’t eliminate them.

    Of course this applies to inadvertant vulnerabilities, but what about malicious actors (though note that Brewer et al. observe that “Taking a step back, although supply-chain attacks are a risk, the vast majority of vulnerabilities are mundane and unintentional—honest errors made by well-intentioned developers.”)? It’s possible that some of their proposed changes (in particular forbidding anonymous authors) might have an impact here, but it’s really hard to see how this is actionable. What’s the standard for not being anonymous? That you have an e-mail address? A Web page? A DUNS number?[3] None of these seem particularly difficult for a dedicated attacker to fake and of course the more strict you make the requirements the more it’s a burden for the (vast majority) of legitimate developers.

    I do want to acknowledge at this point that Brewer et al. clearly state that multiple layers of protection needed and that it’s necessary to have robust mechanisms for handling vulnerability defenses. I agree with all that, I’m just less certain about this particular piece.

  • 26 Firefox Quantum About:Config Tricks You Need to Learn - Make Tech Easier

    “Here be dragons,” reads the ominous disclaimer when you type about:config into Firefox’s URL bar, warning you that tweaking things in this area is largely experimental and can cause instability to your browser.

    Sounds exciting, right? And even though it sounds a little scary, the fact is you will almost certainly be okay when you start playing around in this area and can actually use the features here to improve and speed up your browser. These are Make Tech Easier’s favorite Firefox about:config tricks, freshly updated for Firefox Quantum.

  • Attackers collaborate to exploit CVE-2021-21972 and CVE-2021-21973 - Blueliv

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