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March 2021

Aiven and Total War: ROME REMASTERED

Filed under
Misc
  • Aiven set to grow open source database-as-a-service platform [Ed: "as-a-service" = as in, you're not truly in control, but we use some openwashing for shallow marketing associated (typically) with cost)]

    Heikki Nousiainen: The funding is definitely going to strengthen our position. We believe that there's a big trend moving to open source and moving to cloud with managed services and we are in a very good position to grow aggressively. This round also allows us to significantly increase our investment in the open source technology that we love as we contribute back to projects, making sure that they are healthy.

  • Take a look at some differences in the upcoming Total War: ROME REMASTERED

    Total War: ROME REMASTERED, the recent announcement from Creative Assembly and Feral Interactive is coming to Linux on April 29 and here's a look at what's improved. It's going to be replacing the original too, which only supported Windows, while this will be properly cross-platform across Linux, macOS and Windows together.

    Some of the new improvements include updated battlefield environments, new unit models, an enhanced campaign map, improved visual effects during battles and much more.

Programming Leftovers

Filed under
Development
  • Bash printf Function: 7 Examples for Linux

    If you've been using the Bash shell for a decent amount of time, you probably know how to print strings in the Linux terminal using the echo command. The printf command, however, makes printing text with specific formatting much easier.

    Today we'll learn how to make use of the printf function in order to enhance our Bash scripting skills.

  • Replacing String in Bash | FOSS Linux

    Bash is a UNIX shell-compatible command process whose main task is to manipulate strings conducted in a shell environment. Programmers are at times called upon to work on different files. They can add, delete, and replace parts or the whole file to fit their work. This calls upon the knowledge of replacing string in bash. Data storage can be temporary or permanent, depending on the nature of the data. File string is essential when replacing file contents.

  • On the road to Jakarta EE 9 with Open Liberty betas – IBM Developer

    With the release of Jakarta EE 8, enterprise Java technology joined the open source community. Despite the massive scale of this undertaking, which involved scores of projects, tests, meetings, presentations, and deliberations, the transition was a huge success, providing Java developers worldwide with an open source platform for cloud-native enterprise applications.

    However, the next challenge for Jakarta EE was already on deck. Although Jakarta EE 8 was fully compatible with its Java EE 8 predecessor, for the Jakarta EE 9 release, all the specification package prefixes had to be changed from javax to jakarta. For a cloud-native Java runtime, such as Open Liberty, the challenge is to ensure that this change results in as little disruption as possible for application developers.

  • Daniel Stenberg: curl 7.76.0 adds rustls

    I’m happy to announce that we yet again completed a full eight week release cycle and as customary, we end it with a fresh release. Enjoy!

  • Jussi Pakkanen: Never use environment variables for configuration

    Suppose you need to create a function for adding two numbers together in plain C. How would you write it? What sort of an API would it have?

  • 3 reasons I use the Git cherry-pick command

    Finding your way around a version control system can be tricky. It can be massively overwhelming for a newbie, but being well-versed with the terminology and the basics of a version control system like Git is one of the baby steps to start contributing to open source.

    Being familiar with Git can also help you out of sticky situations in your open source journey. Git is powerful and makes you feel in control—there is not a single way in which you cannot revert to a working version.

  • Qt 6.0.3 Released

    We have released Qt 6.0.3 today. As a patch release the Qt 6.0.3 does not add any new functionality but provides bug fixes and other improvements.

  • Qt 6.0.3 Released With Another ~40 Bug Fixes - Phoronix

    While Qt 6.1 is aiming to release around the end of April, for now the Qt 6.0 series continues marching forward and is out today with the Qt 6.0.3 point release providing another few dozen bug fixes.

  • JavaScript Map – How to Use the JS .map() Function (Array Method)
  • A JavaScript Tutorial

    The overview notes that "JavaScript is now used by an incredible number of high-profile applications, showing that deeper knowledge of this technology is an important skill for any web or mobile developer.” This tutorial explores the various building blocks of the language to help you get started.

  • 5 Best emacs plugins for web development – Linux Hint

    Since you are here, you are already using Emacs for text editing, possibly for email, and certainly for coding tasks. When you start doing serious web development, you want as many advantages as are possible. Here are some tools that will make your experience coding for the web using Emacs.

    As the saying goes, Emacs is an operating system lacking a decent editor. You can set things up so that Emacs runs the entire workflow for you, including git, compiling, and many more things.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Securing and Hardening Linux and Unix Endpoints Against Cyber Attack: Part IV

    How Secure are your Linux Endpoints? An Ethical Hacker’s Guide to Securing and Hardening Linux and Unix Endpoints

  • Henri Sivonen: A Look at Encoding Detection and Encoding Menu Telemetry from Firefox 86

    The failure mode of decoding according to the wrong encoding is very different for the Latin script and for non-Latin scripts. Also, there are historical differences in UTF-8 adoption and encoding labeling in different language contexts. For example, UTF-8 adoption happened sooner for the Arabic script and for Vietnamese while Web developers in Poland and Japan had different attitudes towards encoding labeling early on. For this reason, it’s not enough to look at the global aggregation of data alone.

    Since Firefox’s encoding behavior no longer depends on the UI locale and a substantial number of users use the en-US localization in non-U.S. contexts, I use geographic location rather than the UI locale as a proxy for the legacy encoding family of the Web content primary being read.

    The geographical breakdown of telemetry is presented in the tables by ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code. The code is deduced from the source IP addresses of the telemetry submissions at the time of ingestion after which the IP address itself is discarded. As another point relevant to make about privacy, the measurements below referring to the .jp, .in, and .lk TLDs is not an indication of URL collection. The split into four coarse categories, .jp, .in+.lk, other ccTLD, and non-ccTLD, was done on the client side as a side effect of these four TLD categories getting technically different detection treatment: .jp has a dedicated detector, .in and .lk don’t run detection at all, for other ccTLDs the TLD is one signal taken into account, and for other TLDs the detection is based on the content only. (It’s imaginable that there could be regional differences in how willing users are to participate in telemetry collection, but I don’t know if there actually are regional differences.)

  • Puppy Linux without an initrd

    We know about the 'initrd' file, which is an initramfs that runs first at bootup. EasyOS has this, as do the puppies.
    A traditional full installation, occupying an entire partition, may not need an initrd, and can be run directly from the kernel boot parameters. For example, if the full installation is in /dev/sda9, then boot parameters would include root=/dev/sda9, or the PARTUID could be specified.
    If an initrd is used, the boot parameters would not have root=, instead would have something like initrd=initrd.gz, where initrd.gz is the name of the file, with perhaps a path.
    One of the reasons we have a initrd is to setup the layered filesystem, using overlayfs or aufs, then a switch_root is performed onto the layered filesystem.
    However, Dima, forum name 'dimkr' on github and the Puppy Forum, and 'iguleder' on the old Puppy Murga Forum, has come up with a way to load the layered filesystem without requiring an initrd.

  • Losca: MotionPhoto / MicroVideo File Formats on Pixel Phones

    Google Pixel phones support what they call ”Motion Photo” which is essentially a photo with a short video clip attached to it. They are quite nice since they bring the moment alive, especially as the capturing of the video starts a small moment before the shutter button is pressed. For most viewing programs they simply show as static JPEG photos, but there is more to the files.

  • Containerize all the things! Arm v9 takes security seriously

    The key concept introduced in Arm v9's new Confidential Compute Architecture is the realm. Realms are containerized, isolated execution environments, completely opaque to both operating system and hypervisor. The hypervisor itself will only be responsible for scheduling and resource allocation. Realms themselves are to be managed by the realm manager—a new concept that can apparently be implemented in 1/10th the code required for a hypervisor.

  • Arm pulls the sheets off its latest Armv9 architecture with added AI support, Realms software isolation

    Arm has set out its stall for the first major new version of its instruction set architecture – Armv9 – in about a decade, and promised compatible chips will have improved machine-learning and security capabilities.

    Previous versions of the architecture introduced support for things like virtualization and SIMD; the last major update, Armv8, debuted in 2011. Arm says its latest instruction set architecture, v9, will be geared toward today's top buzzword in tech – AI. The chip design house, which Nvidia is still trying to acquire from Softbank, laid on the marketing a little thick for the unveiling of the ISA, though there is some detail here.

  • Armv9 architecture to focus on AI, security, and “specialized compute”

    Armv8 was announced in October 2011 as the first 64-bit architecture from Arm. while keeping compatibility with 32-bit Armv7 code. Since then we’ve seen plenty of Armv8 cores from the energy-efficient Cortex-A35 to the powerful Cortex-X1 core, as long as some custom cores from Arm partners.

    But Arm has now announced the first new architecture in nearly ten years with Armv9 which builds upon Armv8 but adds blocks for artificial intelligence, security, and “specialized compute” which are basically hardware accelerators or instructions optimized for specific tasks.

  • SiFive Core IP 21G1 release improves bit manipulation, floating-point unit, reduces code footprint

    As SiFive has a portfolio of RISC-V cores ranging from low-power E2-series to high-performance U8-series cores with performance similar to Cortex-A7x cores, the company has not released new cores for a while, and instead focuses on improving their current RISC-V cores.

Red Hat/Fedora Leftovers

Filed under
Red Hat
  • 5 tips to help you prepare for technical certification exams

    As a sysadmin and a consultant, I'm constantly looking for ways to learn new things and keep updated with the latest technologies. In addition to training and self-learning, completing a technical certification program is a good way to learn, sharpen, and demonstrate your skills.

  • Industry trends from the ever evolving service provider edge

    Change is the one constant in computing and networking environments. It has now driven their evolution to encompass the telecommunications edge.

    The centralized cloud in datacenters–today’s dominant paradigm for communications service providers (CSPs)–remains vital to efficiently store and process information. However, as the demand for real-time processing and low-latency connectivity applications and services increases, edge computing is poised to become progressively more important—and, in time, indispensable as part of a hybrid cloud computing model. Service providers can offer an edge cloud platform to deliver services for vertical industry participants, providing more innovation and ultimately serve customers better.

  • Accelerate your DevOps journey with a trio of training offerings from Red Hat

    The successful shaping of an organization’s DevOps culture depends on a few key factors: leadership, technology, and investment in quality training resources. With Red Hat’s immersive DevOps curriculum—featuring courses on open practices to culture enablement—these critical concepts can help catalyze widespread transformation within your organization.

  • Red Hat Certified Specialist in Services Management and Automation

    Late last year, I’ve read that a new Ansible-related exam was available: the Red Hat Certified Specialist in Services Management and Automation exam (EX358). I’ve taken and passed this exam at the end of January. It was the first time I did a Red Hat exam that was brand new and without having the possibility of finding online some opinions around it.

  • Playing with modular synthesizers and VCV Rack

    You know about using Fedora Linux to write code, books, play games, and listen to music. You can also do system simulation, work on electronic circuits, work with embedded systems too via Fedora Labs. But you can also make music with the VCV Rack software. For that, you can use to Fedora Jam or work from a standard Fedora Workstation installation with the LinuxMAO Copr repository enabled. This article describes how to use modular synthesizers controlled by Fedora Linux.

  • Enable serial console for libvirt

    QEMU/KVM libvirt virtual machine can be acessed via serial console. When a new VM is created, serial console device is created. However to fully utilize this, several steps are needed on the guest machine.

  • Policy proposal: Update default content license to CC BY-SA 4.0

    Earlier this month, Matthew Miller suggested the Fedora Council update the default content license from the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) license to the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 (CC BY-SA 4.0) license. This license applies to content (not code) submitted to Fedora that does not have an explicit license attached. It does not override the explicit license choices of contributors or upstream projects.

  • The Lounge web IRC client in Fedora

    My graphics card died and thanks to COVID and Bitcoin, it will be a long wait until it’s back. I am on Mac M1 at the moment and it looks like there are not many good IRC clients on MacOS.

  • Letsencrypt a Fedora server

    I was looking for a simple letsencrypt tutorial for my home server running Fedora but it looks like the official (and quite capable) certbot is not availble in Fedora repos. So I have decided to go a more simple route of using acme-tiny shell script which is present and does the same, at least if you are running Apache httpd.

postmarketOS Second Beta Release: v21.03

Filed under
GNU
Linux

After months of hard work from our amazing community, we are proud to announce the second beta release of postmarketOS, based on Alpine Linux 3.13. The amount of supported devices has been increased from one (just the PinePhone in v20.05) to no less than eleven - and all of them run a (close to) mainline kernel!
Each device is able to run modern phone shells Phosh, Plasma Mobile and Sxmo. The Nokia N900 is an exception of course, for that one we recommend running i3.

As mentioned in the header of the blog post, in its current state, postmarketOS is for Linux enthusiasts. Expect bugs and help out with fixing them. It's a long hard road to an alternative smartphone OS that doesn't track its users, gives back control and makes a long lifetime feasible. But we are making steady progress, and when compared to when we started out, a huge community has been established - not only within postmarketOS, but also a whole ecosystem of other projects that share the same goal and work together.

Release versions of postmarketOS are best for stability. For the over 250 (!) booting devices in the testing category and rolling release thrills, use postmarketOS edge.

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Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: Debian, Lutris, and mintCast

Filed under
GNU
Linux
  • Why Debian is the BEST Distro! The only thing you should install! FULL REVIEW.

    In this video, I talk about my recent realization of how AWESOME Debian is. It's literally the only distribution you should ever consider. Check out this video and I'll let you know why that is (with a little help from some friends).

  • No PRs Please | LINUX Unplugged 399

    Lutris developer Mathieu Comandon joins us to share his perspective on the uncomfortable issues facing Linux desktop developers.

    Plus the tech behind Shells.com, community news, feedback, and more.

    Special Guests: Mathieu Comandon and Zlatan Todorić.

  • mintCast 357.5 – The Endeavour Endeavor

    1:38 Linux Innards
    1:02:02 Vibrations from the Ether
    1:21:06 Check This Out
    1:23:10 Announcements & Outro

    In our Innards section, we answer the question “What’s missing” and dive into the world of Arch

Debian: Ben Hutchings, Chris Lamb, and the Freexian Team

Filed under
Debian
  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, March 2021

    In March I was assigned 16 hours of work by Freexian's Debian LTS initiative and carried over 12.25 hours from earlier months. I worked 25.75 hours and will carry over the remainder.

    I eventually settled on an apparently working patch series to fix the futex security issue in Linux 4.9. This went through upstream stable review and was included in 4.9.260. I applied the same fixes to the Debian package, along with some other security and regression fixes. I uploaded it and issued DLA-2586-1.

  • Chris Lamb: Free software activities in March 2021

    One of the original promises of open source software is that distributed peer review and transparency of process results in enhanced end-user security. However, whilst anyone may inspect the source code of free and open source software for malicious flaws, almost all software today is distributed as pre-compiled binaries. This allows nefarious third-parties to compromise systems by injecting malicious code into ostensibly secure software during the various compilation and distribution processes.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to ensure no flaws have been introduced during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

  • Challenging times for Freexian (2/4)

    Freexian’s “Debian LTS” service has so far been entirely successful, with a steady growth over the years. Thanks to this, and even if there are always new challenges, it is fair to say that the Debian LTS team has met its goal in the last few years.

    While this started from the desire to make LTS a reality, many sponsors are only looking for a way to give back to Debian through their company, and to make sure that Debian fits their needs.

    But if you look at the bigger picture outside of this small LTS area, you will easily find many issues that need to be addressed if we want Debian to meet the needs of corporate users. Those issues can have widely different types and complexity be. They can be as simple as missing the latest upstream version for an important package because the maintainer disappeared and nobody noticed before it was too late (i.e. the release was frozen); or a somewhat basic piece of software not yet packaged at all; or a release critical bug that was left unattended. On the other end of the spectrum, some corporate requirements will prove tougher to solve, for instance for large software suites that are complex to package, or could potentially have an impact elsewhere in Debian.

    [...]

    This major shift in our offering would also be an ideal opportunity to build a professional, free-software based infrastructure aimed at sustaining this business, making it easier to administer the various aspects of this work, and easily allowing many more sponsors to join (individuals included!).

    On a more pragmatic/operational note, this shift will bring a lot of challenges to the table, and those can hardly be handled with the current resources of Freexian: if we hope to properly implement this new strategy, we’ll need some additional help.

The Linux Setup – L.J. Lee, Translator/Researcher/Writer

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Frankly it was that or buy a new computer. I used MacOS from 2015 to 2020, but my hardware couldn’t keep up with the OS updates. When I held back on updates to preserve my customizations and maintain performance I found myself increasingly unsupported and abandoned, unable to install or update apps. My machine, a 2015 Macbook Air, had been made purposefully impossible to upgrade and I either had to abandon a perfectly functional machine or resign myself to a total lack of support.

Even worse, I looked over the new features for the latest OS updates and found nothing that would enhance my experience as a user; just more features designed to monetize me as a customer making recurring payments, and lock me into the Apple ecosystem. It was clear that the support for my older Air was not there in the long term and Apple was taking its personal computing environment in a direction I disagreed with.

I wasn’t new to Linux or free software. I had a little experience using Ubuntu from about a decade back, and had been interested for some years in free and open source software developments. So I thought, why not Linux? And if I was going to move anyway, I figured it was better do it sooner rather than later so I could learn and settle down on my new system. The Mac environment wasn’t getting any friendlier to me with time anyway, and I decided not to stick around until things became completely intolerable.

Cue a trial period with Linux on a virtual machine, a flurry of research and preparation, then taking the jump to wipe Mac OS off the machine to do a bare-metal installation of Linux. The Macbook Air is now a Linux machine that I am much happier with.

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GNOME 40, Your Fast Desktop Computing | A Quick Review

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews

Now I can type ² (exponent two), © (copyright mark), ® (registered trademark), ™ (trademark) with some shortcut keys I chose myself. I do not need to open Insert Special Characters anymore with this ability. This [Compose key] here is an arbitrary key (such as Alt) which when pressed once will show a mark on screen, and I should press Shift+C and then O to make ©. For the superscripts, for example I press Compose key once, then I should press Shift+6, and I press a number. Magic! This can be configured on Settings and Tweaks.

[...]

Since few versions ago, I saw Settings look responsive, that was, resizable to a smartphone screen size. The reason is, that GNOME is indeed made suitable for touchscreen devices (tablet and phones) and today it is made a reality thanks to PinePhone & Librem you can check them out. The new changes at Settings I found are under Keyboard section with Input Sources moved there and added with a new Compose Key facility, however I found Dock is missing (and missing also in Tweaks) and I don't know why -- perhaps just like in the past, GNOME developers want to make Dock position permanent unless we change it someway.

[...]

GNOME Forty is fast I encourage you to try it! Everything feels seamless, looks better designed. Maps, Weather, Settings, and Files after the user navigation are now faster and better. However, there's still some issues and in my opinion the most unpleasant is Software as mentioned above. Overall, it is worth trying and waiting for the inclusion on Ubuntu in particular and on GNU/Linux distros worldwide in general. Finally, enjoy your computer with GNOME! Congratulations and thank you to all GNOME developers!

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mpv-Based Haruna Video Player 0.6.0 Adds MPRISv2 And YouTube Playlists Support

Filed under
Software

Haruna Video Player version 0.6.0 has been released today. The new version adds support for YouTube playlists, integration with MPRISv2 applets, and more.

Haruna is a free and open source Qt / QML video player for Linux that makes use of mpv (libmpv) for video playback.

mpv is a lightweight video player which with features such as hardware acceleration, youtube-dl support, Lua scripting, and more, which uses a minimal user interface. This is where Haruna Video Player come in - it adds a GUI on top of mpv (using libmpv) that can show the playlist on mouse-over, easily configure the keyboard shortcuts and mouse buttons, jump to the next chapter by middle click on the progress bar, load primary and secondary subtitles, perform color adjustments, and more.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Programming Leftovers

  • QuickLicenseRT Linux 3.0 - Protect and License Desktop Software

    QuickLicenseRT Linux 3.0 implements the QuickLicense 9.1 runtime system to protect and license a Linux desktop applications. Apply licensing to a 32 or 64-bit executable with a few programming commands. Use LinuxWrap to license a compiled executable without programming.

  • Turing Award winner Barbara Liskov on CLU and why programming is still cool • The Register

    It has been 12 years since Barbara Liskov won a Turing Award for her contributions to practical and theoretical foundations of programming language and system design, and these days the creator of the CLU programming language continues to work on some interesting problems. We spoke about innovation, abstraction and encapsulation in the 1970s and today in a recent chat. Liskov, now in her 80s, leads the Programming Methodology Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Recently, she has been working on parallel computing and, with a student, developed Byzantine Fault Tolerance* [PDF] in the 1990s, "which turns out to be very significant for the blockchain world," she says.

  • GitLab all set to go public as revenues – and losses – rise

    DevOps darling GitLab has finally filed for an Initial Public Offering (IPO) as revenues continue to grow and losses widen. The IPO had been expected in 2020 but the company put things off due to the pandemic until late last week, when the paperwork was filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The company, founded in 2014, has remained tight-lipped over the sums involved, although the filed S-1 form recorded that the proposed maximum aggregate offering price is estimated at $100m. [...] In the IPO document, Gitlabs said it was on course to grow revenues to $233m in its current financial year ending in 2022. This compares to the $152.2m reported in fiscal 2021 and the $81.2m in the year before that. However, losses also widened over those years. The net loss in fiscal 2020 was $130.7m – but it was $192.2m in fiscal 2021. Net loss reached $69m for the six months ended 31 July 2021, up from $43.5m for the same time last year.

  • The 10 Core Differences Between C and C++

    C and C++ are two different well-recognized programming languages with the function of assembly language. Though both C and C ++ sound similar with an extra "++" on the latter, their features and usage are distinctive. C is a procedural programming language with a static system, whereas C++ is an enhanced version of the C programming language with object-oriented programming support.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

today's howtos

  • How to analyze Linux system boot time with Systemd - Linux Shout

    Systemd is a system and session manager that is responsible for managing all services running on the system over the entire operating time of the computer, from the start-up process to shutdown. Processes are always started in parallel (as far as possible) in order to keep the boot process as short as possible. But how to know which process took how much time while booting your system, well for that we can use the Systemd as well.

  • How To Install Figma on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Figma on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS. For those of you who didn’t know, Figma is a popular tool amongst graphic designers and UI, UX designers. It can be used to create wireframes, high-fidelity interface designs, prototyping, etc. One of the most loved features of Figma is its ability to run inside a browser, which makes it platform-independent. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you the step-by-step installation of the Figma on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). You can follow the same instructions for Ubuntu 18.04, 16.04, and any other Debian-based distribution like Linux Mint.

  • How To Create and Manage Groups in Linux - ByteXD

    A group is a collection of users in Linux that shares some commonalities for the purpose of security, privilege, etc. Linux allows its administrators to create different user groups very easily. This is convenient because you can create a user group and manage all of the user’s permissions at once, instead of individually assigning permissions to each user. If you are not familiar with Linux permissions and how to manage them, take a look at this article. In this tutorial, we will cover how to create groups in Linux and briefly explain how to manage them.

  • What's the differences between a Docker image vs a container? - Coffee Talk: Java, News, Stories and Opinions

    A container is a collection of one or more processes, organized under a single name and identifying ID that is isolated from the other processes running within a computing environment. That computing environment can be a physical computer or a virtual machine. A container image is a template that defines how an image will be realized at runtime. While containers started out as a Linux technology, you can create containers within the Windows operating system too. The important thing to understand about Docker technology is that it has two main components: the client CLI tool and the container runtime. The CLI tool is used to execute instructions to the Docker runtime at the command line. The job of the Docker runtime is to create containers and run them on the operating system.

  • How To Install Yarn on Debian 11 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Yarn on Debian 11. For those of you who didn’t know, Yarn is a package manager for JavaScript that runs on Node.js, allowing developers to manage their application dependencies. It was created to solve a set of problems with npm, such as speeding up the packages installation process by parallelizing operations and reducing errors related to network connectivity. This article assumes you have at least basic knowledge of Linux, know how to use the shell, and most importantly, you host your site on your own VPS. The installation is quite simple and assumes you are running in the root account, if not you may need to add ‘sudo‘ to the commands to get root privileges. I will show you through the step-by-step installation of the Yarn on a Debian 11 (Bullseye).

  • How to Install LaTeX Editor TeXstudio 4.0.0 in Ubuntu 20.04 / 21.10 | UbuntuHandbook

    The open-source LaTeX editor TeXstudio 4.0.0 was released! Here’s how to install it in Ubuntu via PPA repository. TeXstudio 4.0.0 offers Qt6 support which should improve HiDPI handling. And the official packages for Windows and macOS are now based on Qt6, while Linux build sticks to Qt5. The final release is out after 8 alpha, 3 beta and 2 release candidate tests, though it’s announced only with following changes...

  • How to Setup Passwordless SSH Login in Linux with Keys

    Hello Linux geeks, it is always a good practice that Linux systems should be ssh with keys rather than the password. SSH (Secure Shell) keys gives us a secure way to login to Linux and UNIX like servers. When we access Linux systems with SSH keys then it is also known as passwordless ssh authentication. In this post, we will learn how to setup passwordless SSH authentication with keys in Linux.

  • How to prevent a Supply Chain Attack in a Linux Environment

    This is a type of cyberattack that seeks to damage an organization by attacking weaker elements in the supply chain. A supply chain attack can happen across any industry. Software supply chain attacks occur when attackers insert malicious code in a poorly secured part of the software supply chain. This causes a ripple effect, in which a lot of consumers of the software are impacted by the attack.

  • Setup Load Balancing with HAProxy, Nginx and Keepalived in Linux

    In the conventional method of hosting a server or website, the server is hosted through a single HTTP server. When the clients hit on the server, they are allowed on the server. But, what happens when multiple users, even more; thousands of clients, hit the site at a time for some query? What will happen if the server crashes? How will the single server balance the load? To answer all these questions, we can use the term ‘Load balancing’. If you’re looking for authentic tools for managing traffic of your server, you can definitely setup the HAProxy, Nginx, and Keepalived on Linux for load balancing.

  • This Will Make You a Command-Line Ninja | by Erik van Baaren | Python Land | Sep, 2021 | Medium

    A well-crafted bash command or script can save hours of manual labor. This tutorial will show you exactly how easy it is to become a command-line ninja and automate those tedious tasks. If you need to polish your basics, head over to Shell Commands Every Developer Must Know.

  • What Is the Linux Command Line and How Do You Use It?

    The interface you use to view and interact with an operating system, whether text-based or graphical, is known as a shell. The first shells were text-based. This is because the earliest electronic computers were not household devices. Instead, they were giant mainframes that occupied entire rooms. Back then, computing power was pretty low and network connections were slow. You can store very many files, and many users can sign into a system simultaneously over a very slow connection when you’re only working with text. In 1969, Dennis Ritchie and Ken Thompson at Bell Labs developed the Unix operating system, one of the first mainframe operating systems to gain widespread adoption. Unix operated on mainframes as a shared system, with people interacting with the computer from individual terminals consisting of only a keyboard and a screen. Users did everything from creating and navigating files to transmitting data by typing commands using a shell, which the mainframe then interpreted. If anything went wrong, a system administrator could check via a console, a dedicated text-entry, and display device used for system-related messages such as those concerning the BIOS, bootloader, or kernel. Linux is a Unix-like system that replicates much of the functionalities of Unix, but as free software available to all. The Thompson shell (written by Ken Thompson) was the initial shell for Unix, but a replacement came from Stephen Bourne in 1979 known as the Bourne shell. In 1989, Brian Fox create the Bourne Again shell (bash for short) as a free software replacement of the Bourne shell as part of the GNU Project. This is the default shell for most Linux operating systems. Thus we have several of the names that are still commonly used for the command line today: command line, shell, terminal, console, and bash.

Games: Assets, GOG, and Steam

  • Derivation: Episode 1 Motion Comic by Itizso on itch.io - David Revoy

    Game developer Itizso on itch.io made a motion comic derivation with the first webcomic episode of Pepper&Carrot. It's an interesting way to give life to this episode.

  • Trouble is brewing over on GOG due to the HITMAN release needing online for some features | GamingOnLinux

    GOG.com, the store that provides itself on offering "DRM FREE" builds of games has recently released Hitman - Game of The Year Edition from IO Interactive and GOG fans are not happy. To set the scene a little, this is a single-player stealth game about running around assassinating various targets across a bunch of different missions. It's actually a pretty good game and it has a Linux build available on Steam ported by Feral Interactive, which is not up on GOG. Here's the problem: many features in HITMAN require you to have an internet connection. This is different to a game that has online modes which would of course need the internet. This is a game you play by yourself. Story missions and bonus mission can be played offline but you have to be online for most of the progression for item unlocks, new start location unlocks, special contracts, featured contracts, escalation missions and more.

  • Steam Deck: Official Anti-Cheat Support Incoming in 2021

    If you have been following news closely (including with our recent Podcast with James Ramey) it should come as no surprise to see official support for EAC ahead of the Steam Deck launch. As discussed during our interview, this will probably require signed Proton builds in order to have EAC running in the games that require it (one of the requirements of Anti-cheat technology is to have reproducible environments). In practical terms this probably means that custom Proton builds made by third parties (like Proton GE) may not be able to include such support. We will have to see when more details surface. [...] With these two announcements, it looks like there should be a nice jump in compatibility for anything running under Proton in the very near future (maybe even ahead of the Steam Deck launch). Will that be enough to reach 100% compatibility as announced by Valve? Probably not, but my guess is that the fact that they are shipping a truckload of devkits of the Steam Deck early to developers is going to help for the remaining gaps.