Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

April 2022

Videos/Audiocasts/Shows: OBS, OpenArena, mintCast, Linux App Summit 2022

Filed under
GNU
Linux

consfigurator 1.0.0

Filed under
Development
Software

I am pleased to announce Consfigurator 1.0.0.

Reaching version 1.0.0 signifies that we will try to avoid API breaks. You should be able to use Consfigurator to manage production systems.

Read more

Unity 7.6 Released for Public Testing as the First Major Update to Unity7 in 6 Years

Filed under
Linux
News
Ubuntu

Featuring a new flat UI while retaining the system-wide blur, Unity 7.6 promises major improvements like redesigned Unity Dash (app launcher) and HUD, as well as refreshed styles for dock’s menus and tooltips for a modern and slick look, and improved low graphics mode to make the Unity Dash faster.

The upcoming release also improves the app info and ratings in the Unity Dash preview, improves the “Empty Trash” button in Unity Dock to use the Nemo file manager instead of Nautilus, and lowers the RAM usage.

Read more

GNOME 43 Release Date Slated for September 21st, 2022

Filed under
Linux
News
GNOME

The release schedule for the upcoming GNOME 43 desktop environment series was published at the end of March 2022, shortly after the release of the GNOME 42 desktop environment, suggesting that the final release date is slated for September 21st, 2022.

GNOME 43 will be the third major update in the GNOME 4x series, and development slowly kicked off this month but an alpha version will be readied for public testing in early July, while the beta version is expected a month later in early August.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

  • Changes/StrongCryptoSettings3Forewarning1

    Cryptographic policies will be tightened in Fedora 38-39, SHA-1 signatures will no longer be trusted by default. Fedora 37 specifically doesn't come with any change of defaults, and this Fedora Change is an advance warning filed for extra visibility. Test your setup with FUTURE today and file bugs so you won't get bit by Fedora 38-39.

  • Kubernetes backup with advanced cluster recovery for SUSE Rancher clusters | SUSE Communities

    SUSE Rancher includes a rancher-backup operator to easily backup, restore or migrate Rancher. However, for broad, ecosystem wide backup and disaster recovery, SUSE’s software development partners step in with application, data and workload-centric solutions addressing the needs of an entire Kubernetes computing landscape. Catalogic Software, a SUSE One Gold Innovate partner, delivers CloudCasa, a Kubernetes Backup and DR as a Service offering, and we’ve invited Catalogic to author a guest blog so you can learn more about their solution. ~Bret

  • threads and libxcb, part 2

    I've been working on kopper recently, which is a complementary project to zink. Just as zink implements OpenGL in terms of Vulkan, kopper seeks to implement the GL window system bindings - like EGL and GLX - in terms of the Vulkan WSI extensions. There are several benefits to doing this, which I'll get into in a future post, but today's story is really about libX11 and libxcb.

    Yes, again.

    One important GLX feature is the ability to set the swap interval, which is how you get tear-free rendering by syncing buffer swaps to the vertical retrace. A swap interval of 1 is the typical case, where an image update happens once per frame. The Vulkan way to do this is to set the swapchain present mode to FIFO, since FIFO updates are implicitly synced to vblank. Mesa's WSI code for X11 uses a swapchain management thread for FIFO present modes. This thread is started from inside the vulkan driver, and it only uses libxcb to talk to the X server. But libGL is a libX11 client library, so in this scenario there is always an "xlib thread" as well.

    libX11 uses libxcb internally these days, because otherwise there would be no way to intermix xlib and xcb calls in the same process. But it does not use libxcb's reflection of the protocol, XGetGeometry does not call xcb_get_geometry for example. Instead, libxcb has an API to allow other code to take over the write side of the display socket, with a callback mechanism to get it back when another xcb client issues a request. The callback function libX11 uses here is straightforward: lock the Display, flush out any internally buffered requests, and return the sequence number of the last request written. Both libraries need this sequence number for various reasons internally, xcb for example uses it to make sure replies go back to the thread that issued the request.

  • Hackaday Podcast 166: Engraving With The Sun, Explosive Welding, Juggling Chainsaws, And Torturing Wago Connectors

    Join Hackaday Editor-in-Chief Elliot Williams and Staff Writer Dan Maloney as they dive into the last week of Hackaday articles. If you love things that go boom, you won’t want to miss the discussion about explosive welding. Ever use the sun to burn something with a magnifying glass? Now you can CNC that, if you dare. We’ll take a quick trip through the darkroom and look at analog-digital photography as well as a tactical enlarger you can build, watch someone do terrible things to Wago and Wago-adjacent connectors, and talk about how suborbital chainsaws can be leveraged into a mass storage medium. Not enough for you? Then don’t miss our bafflement at one corporation’s attitude toward 3D printing, the secret sauce of resin casting, and our rundown of the 2022 Sci-Fi Contest winners.

  • GRAID SupremeRAID SR-1010: unleashes record-breaking 110GB/sec reads | TweakTown

    The huge 110GB/sec reads are also only in a Linux environment, and on a RAID 5, RAID 6, or RAID 10 array. If you are on a Windows environment then those super-fast read speeds drop rather significantly: 70GB/sec reads (versus 110GB/sec on Linux) and 35GB/sec reads (up from 25GB/sec on Linux).

Games: Steam Deck and Dungeon Crawler Jam

Filed under
Gaming

Linux Devices: Librem, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and More

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware

  • Weekly #LinuxPhone Update (17/2022): Plasma Mobile Gear 22.04, Nemo Mobile 0.9 and Phosh gesture support is inching closer!

    It's saturday, Linux App Summit is taking place. There's some bad news regarding open modem firmware and I am writing this in a train slowly but surely taking me to the sea for some time off.

  • Self Hosted forum with phpBB and Raspberry PI

    King of self-hosted forum platforms, phpBB has a strong story and is spreadly used. As its name suggests, it is based on PHP and is so light that you can run your self-hosted forum with phpBB on Raspberry PI

    In this tutorial, I’m going to show you how to install phpBB and configure your very first topic on a cheap Raspberry PI Zero W.

    phpBB is an open-source (Licensed under the GPLv2) forum software, built with a bulletin board logic, that can link a group of people or can power an entire website. Its features can be extended using extensions that can be installed and configured with few clicks.
    PhpBB includes a customizable registration process for your users, allowing administrators to manage permissions up to a fine level.

  • Improving the Stability and Reliability with a Modular Modem in the Librem 5 – Purism

    Usually we can fully rely on our phones to be reachable at any time—given cellular reception of course—and we take that for granted.

    You surely know situations in your life where that becomes especially critical. Be it when you’re expecting an important call or when you need to be able to receive “emergency” calls in general. The Librem 5 phone is the primary device for the majority of our team, therefore the stability and reliability for us is equally as important for us as our customers.

    The Librem 5 phone is a pretty exceptional device. It’s a general- purpose computer running the same software that laptops run. Plug in a cellular modem into a laptop and you have roughly the same thing in just a different form factor.

    One of the hardest things these days is to get a removable cellular modem card that does audio calls in the first place. It’s a tough market full of proprietary hardware and software where licensing requirements inhibit modems from doing audio calling. For the Librem 5 phone we found one but we can really consider ourselves fortunate as it was and will continue to be a supply chain challenge.

  • DIY SBC cases and SBC Case Builder tool based on OpenSCAD - CNX Software

    Since you can’t always rely on single board computer (SBC) vendors to provide a case to match your needs, some went the DIY route. Willy Tarreau designed some laser-cut enclosures with Inkscape for various SBCs, while hominoids went a step further by developing the “SBC Case Builder” tool to automatically generate various types of 3D printable enclosures using OpenSCAD.

  • Firmware updates, part 1: Bootloader

    This is the first post in a series about doing device firmware updates (DFU) over the air (OTA) and continuous delivery of firmware for embedded devices. We'll explore the different parts of a complete end-to-end system with this capability.

    This post will be about a fundamental component in such a system: the bootloader.

  • Shedding light on power plant control networks

    Like all critical infrastructure sectors, the energy sector has become reliant on automation techniques to monitor and control its networks. However, not much is publicly known about these techniques or the networks that tend to use proprietary protocols and operate in closed settings.

    To address this knowledge gap, we at the Brandenburg University of Technology, recently conducted a project to study the design of industrial control networks that run power plants. Below are some of our key takeaways that we presented recently at PAM 2022.

  • How effective is HTTPS/TLS usage in the consumer IoT ecosystem?

    Unfortunately, little is known about the degree of effectiveness with which IoT devices use TLS. What’s more worrisome is that TLS usage in other non-browser software has been found to be particularly problematic, with some experts calling it “the most dangerous code in the world”.

    To fill this knowledge gap, we at Northeastern University and IMDEA Networks studied ~17M TLS IoT device connections. The following post offers a brief snapshot of what we discovered and presented at IMC 2021.

  • Arduino And Git: Two Views

    You can’t do much development without running into Git, the version control management system. Part of that is because so much code lives on GitHub which uses Git, although you don’t need to know anything about that if all you want to do is download code. [Dr. Torq] has a good primer on using Git with the Arduino IDE, if you need to get your toes wet.

Free Software Leftovers

Filed under
Software

  • What Computer Science Programs Should Teach (IMHO)

    Mostly I’m impressed with the energy out of new graduates, but observing some things, I think I’m not positive that is directly correlated to what colleges are teaching them. There are also a lot of things in industry that I see people lack experience in, and while it’s not the fault of a college program to teach people things, nor even should it be a requirement that someone have a CS degree, these are things that are most easily fixed if they were addressed at this level.

    Well, first off, there is little “Computer Science” in much of anything any of us in the computer industry do. So I think, really, we should just admit that what universities are teaching is “software engineering”. That’s ok. Call it that if it lets you rewrite the curriculum. Even that’s a euphemism though? Should we maybe first admit that too?

  • People of WordPress: Meher Bala

    In this series, we share some of the inspiring stories of how WordPress and its global network of contributors can change people’s lives for the better. This month we feature a Indian-based WordPress developer and long term contributor on how it helped her find a career and a local and global community to belong to.

    WordPress is an inspiration to Meher Bala, a frontend web developer and community builder from India. From using the software as a basic website tool to helping entrepreneurs and good causes around the world fulfill their aspirations, she has overcome personal barriers and now aims to inspire others.

    Meher found her vocation and learned new skills through WordPress. She also discovered a way to encourage other women to consider careers in IT.

  • 8 Photoshop Alternatives for Creating 3D Elements

    Blender is a favorite among 3D designers. Whether you’re creating a scene or a character, there’s not much you can’t do with this software.

    You can use Blender for 3D printing, and like Substance 3D Stager, you can add lighting to your scenes or work with UV maps to create accurate texture mapping in Blender designs. And that’s not even the half of it; check out these Blender tutorials to acquaint yourself with the program.

    Blender’s 3D abilities are definitely more complex than what was offered by Photoshop’s 3D features. It can easily replace some features like 3D text creation and perspective warping.

  • Uncurled

    The uncurled book is now in a state I think I can show off without feeling embarrassed. I believe I will still need to work on it more going forward to add and polish content and make it more coherent and less of a collection of snippets. I hope that I over time can settle down and gradually slow down the change pace. It will of course also depend a lot on the feedback I get.

EU Joins Mastodon Social Network, Sets Up Its Own Server

Filed under
Server

The effort is currently only a pilot, but it represents the EU’s goal of supporting private and open-source software capable of rivaling mainstream social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube. On the same day, the European Commission also launched an account for PeerTube, another decentralized platform that revolves around video sharing.

Read more

Inform 7 v10.1.0 is now open-source

Filed under
Software

Inform is a design system for interactive fiction based on natural language, and consists of a core compiler, together with extensions, kits and other resources, a number of outlying tools, and documentation, along with applications presenting the system in a friendly way on MacOS, Windows and Linux. This software had been used extensively since 28 April 2006, but by 2016 its source code was in considerable need of modernisation. In part that was wear-and-tear, but it was also the effect of years of experiment in which the code was often built without a full understanding of the concepts it was groping towards. In early 2016, then, a substantial work of renovation began. That work is now essentially complete, and the first results can be seen. The git repository “GitHub - ganelson/inform: The core software distribution for the Inform 7 programming language.” became public today, presenting the complete source and extensive technical documentation. And with that, the whole system was placed under the highly permissive [sic] Artistic License 2.0. This is an open-source licence recognised as such by, for example, the Free Software Foundation.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

How to Exclude Packages from Transactions using DNF in RHEL Linux

While updating packages in your system, you might not want to allow specific packages from transactions, such as updates, for various reasons, such as bugs or instability in the latest release. Packages such as Kernel, PHP, MySql, Apache, Nginx, Python, etc., are regularly used on the running server. Updating them into unstable releases might lead to a catastrophe event. Read more

Thunderbird 102 Gets Makeover with New Colourful Icons, Redesigned UI

Release highlights of open-source email client Thunderbird 102 which brings revamped UI, fresh icons, Matrix chat support and more. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Greece about to secure Router Freedom but leaves fiber out

    Greece is one step closer to securing Router Freedom, but regulators are excluding fiber (FTTH) connections from the legislation. A coalition of organisations, allies of the FSFE, is now requesting that lawmakers reconsider this and thus safeguard the freedom of all users. Since 2021, the regulatory process that defines the network termination point (the NTP) in Greece has been carried out by the Hellenic Telecommunications and Post Commission (EETT). Defining the NTP is necessary to determine whether users have the right to choose their own router and modem or if their Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have the final say over network equipment. In April 2022, we welcomed that the Greek regulator proposed legislation safeguarding Router Freedom for common networks, such as DSL and coaxial. This is a leap forward in safeguarding consumer rights. However, in the same proposal, EETT has explicitly excluded fiber connections (FTTH), a decision that has the potential of negatively impacting end-users’ rights. The proposed regulation sets the NTP for fiber connections in a position that would make the optical terminal equipment part of the ISPs’ networks, making home network access equipment the property of the ISP. The FSFE assisted a coalition of organisations to respond to the EETT’s public consultation, supporting the regulator to implement Router Freedom for all types of internet connection, including FTTH.

  • Sentry: Why we support OSI

    Sentry is a developer-first application monitoring tool that allows development teams to holistically monitor their application health from frontend to backend. Used by 3.5 million developers and 85,000 organizations including some of the world’s best-known companies including GitHub, Peloton, Cloudflare and more.

  • IBM’s AI-powered Mayflower ship crosses the Atlantic [Ed: This was a complete failure. It did not even reach its destination.]

    A groundbreaking AI-powered ship designed by IBM has successfully crossed the Atlantic, albeit not quite as planned. The Mayflower – named after the ship which carried Pilgrims from Plymouth, UK to Massachusetts, US in 1620 – is a 50-foot crewless vessel that relies on AI and edge computing to navigate the often harsh and unpredictable oceans.

  • HPE Allies With Red Hat and SUSE on Containers - Container Journal

    At the HPE Discover 2022 conference, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise (HPE) today expanded its reach into container environments via separate alliances with Red Hat and SUSE. The Kubernetes-based Red Hat OpenShift platform along with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) operating system and Red Hat Ansible automation platform will be made available via the HPE GreenLake managed service, HPE said.

  • Bishop AI: A JavaScript-based Virtual Assistant With Natural Language Processing

    It was created in 2018, making it one of the newest open source software. And it is also released under the MIT license. The program is written in JavaScript, and built to handle Q/A style conversation. [...] Bishop AI is a MIT project; that’s why it is very likely that you will find it already packaged and available to install.

  • AI Based Virtual Assistant in Python

    Many automation tools aims to help user in many fields in their life such as opening any application on the system, play and control music, solve mathematical expressions, getting weather details, and more.

today's howtos

  • Notes on running containers with bubblewrap

    Hello! About a year ago I got mad about Docker container startup time. This was because I was building an nginx playground where I was starting a new “container” on every HTTP request, and so for it to feel reasonably snappy, nginx needed to start quickly. Also, I was running this project on a pretty small cloud machine (256MB RAM), a small CPU, so I really wanted to avoid unnecessary overhead. I’ve been looking for a way to run containers faster since then, but I couldn’t find one until last week when I discovered bubblewrap!! It’s very fast and I think it’s super cool, but I also ran into a bunch of fun problems that I wanted to write down for my future self.

  • Fix: Why Isn’t Linux Detecting My Wi-Fi Adapter?

    Historically, Linux has had a somewhat strained relationship with Wi-Fi cards. In recent years, the situation has changed considerably—and for the better—but it is still possible to boot into your new Linux installation and get that sinking feeling when you realize you’ve got no Wi-Fi. Installation routines are very good at identifying the various components of the target computer and configuring itself to work with that hardware. But problems can still happen. Troubleshooting hardware issues is difficult, especially if the only computer you have on hand is the broken device. Obviously, not everything presented here will be applicable to all cases. But hopefully, something below will either fix your issue or point you in the right direction.

  • Open-sourced tool speeds up Linux scripts via parallelization | Network World

    MIT has open-sourced pa.sh (also called pash), a tool that can dramatically speed up Linux scripts by using parallelization, saving time and without risk of introducing errors. The process of parallelization first examines a script for code that can be run separately and independently, so not all scripts can benefit from the tool. But when pa.sh does find portions that can run independently, it runs them in parallel on separate CPUs. It also uses other techniques to get the code to run faster. Below is a demonstration I ran on my home Fedora box, first running a script on its own and then again using pa.sh. Note that this script was provided with the pa.sh tool and lends itself to parallelization. It’s not nearly as demanding as scripts that might process gigabytes of data in a scientific or artificial-intelligence lab, so the results are not dramatic.

  • [GSoC 2022] ARM port and device tree support Phase 1

    The following will show how to compile haiku on osx and run it on qemu (my version: hrev56168)

  • Building in Kubernetes Using Tekton

    Continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD) principles offer multiple benefits to software organizations, including faster time to market, higher-quality code, and simpler and faster fault isolation. Applications built using CI/CD pipeline best practices tend to see a huge increase in users over time, necessitating a migration from a large codebase and low-scalability monolithic architecture to a more manageable and efficient microservice architecture. Kubernetes is one of the most popular platforms for automating the management, deployment, and scaling processes of microservice applications. Because Kubernetes is complex, though, a framework can help developers and operations teams use the platform to follow CI/CD practices in building applications. This is where Tekton comes in.

  • Hetzner cloud and DragonFly

    When you are setting up a DragonFly machine on Hetzner, pay attention to this bug report for dhcp setup. The short answer is “use dhcpcd”.