Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

bigbearomaha's blog

Exploring Strange New Worlds...

Filed under
Just talk

I've seen it discussed before, but it sometimes doesn't really hit me until I see where someone who is talking around it, completely misses it.

Of course, I'm talking about the Star Trek influence. How close are we to realizing Star Trek Technology?

Personal Computing on the fly

Filed under
Linux

The cloud. It's the talk of the town and has been growing for awhile now.

Linux Can Take Over If It Sticks To What It Does Best. Appliances

Filed under
Linux

Everyone is always so fixated on desktop Linux and why it can't get decent numbers in the desktop market.

The answer is obvious. You can't come late into the game when someone has a huge installed base and expect to win based on free over easy.

Looking at the computer experience

Filed under
Linux

Just a bit of rambling about Linux, as well as reflections and meanderings about computer history in general

A Year Into Linux Mint Debian Edition

Filed under
Reviews

LMDE is a mixed bag. On one hand, you get a Debian install with the Mint specific user software that makes the end user a very nice experience. On the other hand, it's still being tweaked and played with. This can lead to some frustration with apps that haven't had all the kinks worked out yet.

Tabletop RPG's in a Linux World

Everyone knows about video games and the issues facing them in Linux. Not as many people are aware though that tabletop role Playing Games are experiencing a bit of a surge in popularity and that Linux and other open source software are able to assist in that growth.

What Does Linux and Role Playing Games Have in Common?

As a recently revived Game Master/DM going back to my RPG roots in Advanced Dungeons & Dragons, 1st Edition after about a 20 year absence, I find that computer technology has impacted Role Playing Games far beyond being able to play online.

Big Bear's Helpful Hints-Google Docs Spreadsheets

Filed under
Howtos

I like to jot down things that I learn how to do on the spur of the moment so that I can find it later.

I admit, in the 80's there was quite of bit of "herbal remedy" usage and my short term memory isn't what it could be. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

I've decided that I might as well potentially help some other folks who might want to know about some of the things I discover, so I thought why not here?

For my very first post, I wanted to figure out how to sum cells across multiple pages in Google Docs spreadsheets.

Tomboy and Dropbox, the Dynamic Duo

Filed under
Linux

I just saw an article headline about Tomboy and it's strengths. It made me think about all the reasons I use Tomboy and perhaps my favorite reason for using it.

I use Dropbox because I like having access to files regardless of what computer I'm using or where I'm at. It is extremely helpful to me.

Looking for help to bring a new app to the world

Aloha folks,

For those programmers, packagers, etc... who might be looking to help on a new project, maybe you will find this interesting.

Cloud computing on Linux can help small business

Big companies like RedHat are getting into Software as a Service, otherwise known as "cloud computing".

School computer introductions

Filed under
Just talk

After reading an article recently on a similar topic, I got to thinking about what I was introduced to relating to computers when I was in school.

I was in high school when I got my first real introduction to computers.

Paranoia and criticism, how it was meant and how it is taken

Filed under
Linux

It's interesting to see how many people automatically associate criticism with "Anti-X distro".

One Linux to rule them all

There is a whole lot of noise being made about Googles OS announcement.

Most of it being made by raving distro fanboys who believe that by pledging their allegiance to one distro will make part of the 'cool crowd'

"No thanks Google, we have Ubuntu/Debian/Gentoo/pick one"

OpenSource Software Bounty Hunters

Wanted!

OpenSource developers to make software people actually want and need.

Bounty offered

See Sheriff for details

One computers' Linux experience

I suppose , in answer to the question "When will Linux be ready for the user desktop?"

It was ready almost two years ago in this house. Children use it daily, as well as computer phobic wives and memory challenged mad computer geniuses. (The 'genius' part is up for speculation.)

HackMy...phase II

For those of you who don't know, Hackmy... forums started out as a "advanced" forum for users of PCLinuxOS.

HackMy has moved to a new host and has a whole new look and goal though. Hackmy is now open to users of Linux, ANY distro.

How about "just using" instead of "migrating"?

Filed under
Linux

Take a big, deep breath and repeat after me, "There is no perfect OS, there is no perfect OS".

OK, fine, now read this.

The worlds best Linux Distro is now available.

Filed under
Humor

Here it is, the earth shaking, mind breaking, hip shaking est Linux distro ever. It will do "all dat" and more.

Want to know more about it? Knock on the big green emerald doors and ask to see the wizard.

Some Reasons NOT to use Linux. Ever. At all.

Filed under
Just talk

Reasons to not even bother trying Linux, ever : ( cue drum roll... )

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Pumpkins, markets, and one bad Apple

Imagine your local farmers market: every Saturday the whole town comes together to purchase fresh and homemade goods, enjoy the entertainment, and find that there is always something for everyone. Whatever you need, you can find it here, and anyone can sign up to have their own little stand. It is a wonderful place, or so it seems. Now, imagine starting out as a pumpkin farmer, and you want to sell your pumpkins at this market. The market owner asks 30% of every pumpkin that you sell. It's steep, but the market owner -- we'll call him Mr. Apple -- owns all the markets in your area, so you have little choice. Let's continue this analogy and imagine that, since it is a little hard for you to make ends meet, you decide to tell your customers that they can come visit you at your farm to purchase pumpkins. Mr. Apple overhears and shuts your stand down. You explain that your business cannot be profitable this way, but the grumpy market owner says that you can either comply or find another place. At the end of your rope, you look for information about starting your own farmers market, but it seems Mr. Apple owns every building in town. In the midst of Apple announcing its new products, attention is drawn away from its ongoing battle to maintain its subjugation over users globally. The Netherlands’ Authority for Consumers and Markets (ACM) last month informed the U.S. technology giant of its decision that the rules around the in-app payment system are anticompetitive, making it the first antitrust regulator to conclude that the company has abused market power in the App Store. And while Apple is appealing this verdict, the European Union is charging the company with another antitrust claim concerning the App Store. Read more

today's howtos

  • How To Install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 - howtodojo

    In this tutorial, we learn how to install PostgreSQL 14 on Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa). PostgreSQL, or usually called Postgres, is an open-source object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) with an emphasis on extensibility and standards compliance. PostgreSQL is ACID-compliant and transactional. It is developed by PostgreSQL Global Development Group (PGDG) that consists of many companies and individual contributors. PostgreSQL released under the terms of PostgreSQL license.

  • How to Install Minikube on CentOS 8 - Unixcop

    Minikube is open source software for setting up a single-node Kubernetes cluster on your local machine. The software starts up a virtual machine and runs a Kubernetes cluster inside of it, allowing you to test in a Kubernetes environment locally. Minikube is a tool that runs a single-node Kubernetes cluster in a virtual machine on your laptop. In this tutorial we will show you how to install Minikube on CentOS 8.

  • How to Install and Secure Redis on Ubuntu 20.04 | RoseHosting

    Redis (short for Remote Dictionary Server), is an open-source in-memory data structure store. It’s used as a flexible, highly available key-value database that maintains a high level of performance. It helps to reduce time delays and increase the performance of your application by accessing in microseconds.

  • How to Upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 - OMG! Ubuntu!

    If the glowing reviews for the Ubuntu 21.10 release have you intrigued, here’s how to upgrade to Ubuntu 21.10 from an earlier version. Fair warning: this tutorial is super straightforward (the benefits of upgrading after a stable release, rather than a little bit before). Meaning no, you don’t need to be a Linux guru to get going! There are plenty of good reasons to upgrade from Ubuntu 21.04 to Ubuntu 21.10, such as benefiting from a newer Linux kernel, enjoying a new GNOME desktop, sampling the new Yaru Light theme, and getting to go hands-on with an able assortment of updated apps.

  • How to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Adobe Flash Player on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4 - Invidious

    In this video, we are looking at how to install OnlyOffice on Linux Lite 5.4. Enjoy!

  • Jenkins: How to add a JDK version - Anto ./ Online

    This guide will show you how to add a JDK version to Jenkins. If you plan to run a Java build requiring a specific version of the Java Development Kit, you need to do this.

  • Sending EmailsSend them from Linux Terminal? | Linux Journal

    Does your job require sending a lot of emails on a daily basis? And you often wonder if or how you can send email messages from the Linux terminal. This article explains about 6 different ways of sending emails using the Linux terminal. Let’s go through them.

Development version: GIMP 2.99.8 Released

GIMP 2.99.8 is our new development version, once again coming with a huge set of improvements. Read more Some early coverage:

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released with Clone Tool Tweaks, Support for Windows Ink

    A new development version of GIMP is available to download and it carries some interesting new features. While this isn’t a new stable release — GIMP 2.10.28 is the most recent stable release (and the version you’ll find in Ubuntu 21.10’s archives) — the release of GIMP 2.99.8 is yet another brick in the road to the long-fabled GIMP 3.0 release. And it’s a fairly substantial brick, at that.

  • GIMP 2.99.8 Released As Another Step Toward The Long Overdue GIMP 3.0

    GIMP 3.0 as the GTK3 port of this open-source Adobe Photoshop alternative has been talked about for nearly a decade now and the work remains ongoing. However, out today is GIMP 2.99.8 as the newest development snapshot.

Mozilla: Six-Year Moziversary, Thomas Park/Codepip, and Weak Response to Critics of Firefox Spyware

  • Chris H-C: Six-Year Moziversary

    I’ve been working at Mozilla for six years today. Wow. Okay, so what’s happened… I’ve been promoted to Staff Software Engineer. Georg and I’d been working on that before he left, and then, well *gestures at everything*. This means it doesn’t really _feel_ that different to be a Staff instead of a Senior since I’ve been operating at the latter level for over a year now, but the it’s nice that the title caught up. Next stop: well, actually, I think Staff’s a good place for now. Firefox On Glean did indeed take my entire 2020 at work, and did complete on time and on budget. Glean is now available to be used in Firefox Desktop.

  • Hacks.Mozilla.Org: Hacks Decoded: Thomas Park, Founder of Codepip

    Thomas Park is a software developer based in the U.S. (Philadelphia, specifically). Previously, he was a teacher and researcher at Drexel University and even worked at Mozilla Foundation for a stint. Now, he’s the founder of Codepip, a platform that offers games that teach players how to code. Park has made a couple games himself: Flexbox Froggy and Grid Garden.

  • Mark Surman: Exploring better data stewardship at Mozilla [Ed: Mozilla fails to admit that spying on Firefox users is wrong; now it's misframing the criticism and responds to a straw man]

    Over the last few years, Mozilla has increasingly turned its attention to the question of ‘how we build more trustworthy AI?’ Data is at the core of this question. Who has our data? What are they using it for? Do they have my interests in mind, or only their own? Do I trust them? We decided earlier this year that ‘better data stewardship’ should be one of the three big areas of focus for our trustworthy AI work. One part of this focus is supporting the growing field of people working on data trusts, data cooperatives and other efforts to build trust and shift power dynamics around data. In partnership with Luminate and Siegel, we launched the Mozilla Data Futures Lab in March as a way to drive this part of the work.