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Security: Updates, Google, Hacking Team, Microsoft-NSA, Django

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Security
  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • How Did Google Wipe Out 700,000 Malicious Android Apps From Play Store? Using Artificial Intelligence
  • Hacking Team Is Still Alive Thanks to a Mysterious Investor From Saudi Arabia

    The 2015 breach of spyware vendor Hacking Team seemed like it should have ended the company. Hacking Team was thoroughly owned, with its once-secret list of customers, internal emails, and spyware source code leaked online for anyone to see. But nearly three years later, the company trudges on, in large part thanks to a cash influx in 2016 from a mysterious investor who had been publicly unknown until now.

    The hack hurt the company’s reputation and bottom line: Hacking Team lost customers, was struggling to make new ones, and several key employees left. Three years later—after the appearance of this new investor—the company appears to have stopped the bleeding. The company registered around $1 million in losses in 2015, but bounced back with around $600,000 in profits in 2016.

    Motherboard has learned that this apparent recovery is in part thanks to the new investor, who appears to be from Saudi Arabia—and whose lawyer’s name matches that of a prominent Saudi attorney who regularly works for the Saudi Arabian government and facilitates deals between the government and international companies.

  • NSA exploit EternalBlue is back and powering WannaMine cryptojacking malware

    SAY HELLO to WannaMine, the cryptojacking malware that's using leaked NSA hacking tools to infiltrate computers and syphon processor power to crunch calculations needed to 'mine; cryptocurrencies.

    But first a history lesson. You may remember the EternalBlue, a Windows exploit developed by the NSA that was leaked by hacking group Shadow Brokers.

    Pretty soon after the exploit was used to launch the massive WannaCry ransomware attack that locked down NHS systems and affected some 230,000 computers across 150 countries. EternalBlue was then used to spearhead the arguably more dangerous NotPetya attacks.

  • Johnny Hacker hauls out NSA-crafted Server Message Block exploits, revamps 'em

    EternalBlue, EternalSynergy, EternalRomance and EternalChampion formed part of the arsenal of NSA-developed hacking tools that were leaked by the Shadow Brokers group before they were used (in part) to mount the devastating NotPetya cyber attack.

    [...]

    "After that, the exploit module will drop to disk (or use a PowerShell command), explains zerosum0x0, and then copy directly to the hard drive."

  • 10 tips for making the Django Admin more secure

    Offloading the responsibility for making your app secure onto QA testers or an information security office is tempting, but security is everyone's responsibility. The Django Admin is one of our favorite features of Django, but unless it's locked down correctly, it presents opportunities for exploitation. To save your users from compromised data, here are 10 tips to make the Django Admin more secure.

More in Tux Machines

Apache Rya matures open source triple store database

The open source Apache Rya database effort is continuing to move forward as it reaches a new level of project maturity and acceptance. Rya (pronounced "ree-uh") is an RDF (resource description framework) triple store database. The project started at the U.S. government's Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences with an initial research paper published in 2012. The project joined the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in 2015 as an incubated project, and in September 2019 achieved what is known as Top-Level Project status. The Top-Level status is an indication and validation of the project's maturity, code quality and community. The ASF is home to Hadoop, Spark and other widely used database and data management programs. Read more Also: Yahoo Groups is being prepared for shutdown, with all stored archives to be deleted on Dec 14

The Spectre Mitigation Impact For Intel Ice Lake With Core i7-1065G7

For those wondering if -- or how much -- of a performance impact mitigations still make regarding Spectre for Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Ice Lake processors, here is the rundown on the mitigation state and the performance impact. One of the areas that Phoronix readers have requested testing on with the recent purchase of the Dell XPS 7390 with Core i7 1065G7 is regarding the mitigation state and performance. Ice Lake with its Sunny Cove microarchitecture -- similar to Cascade Lake -- is no longer affected by Meltdown, MDS, or L1TF / Foreshadow. Read more

Networking SBCs run Linux on quad -A53 and -A72 NXP LS chips

Forlinx’s sandwich-style OK1043A-C and OK1046A SBCs run Linux on NXP’s quad -A53 LS1043A and quad -A72 LS1046A SoCs, respectively, and offer a 10GbE port and up to 6x GbE ports with optional SFP. Forlinx has posted product pages for two similar COM Express modules and carrier boards that run Linux on NXP’s networking focused LS series processors. The FET1043A-C module taps the up to 1.6GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A53 LS1043A while the FET1046A-C uses the up to 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 LS1046A. All the processors are headless — without GPUs. Read more

Security: WireGuard, Birds and Updates

  • WireGuard Restored In Android's Google Play Store After Brief But Controversial Removal

    After Google dropped the open-source WireGuard app from their Play Store since it contained a donation link, the app has now been restored within Google's software store for Android users but without the donation option. The WireGuard app for Android makes it easy to setup the secure VPN tunnel software on mobile devices, similar to its port to iOS and other platforms. The WireGuard apps are free but have included a donation link to the WireGuard website should anyone wish to optionally make a donation to support the development of this very promising network tech.

  • Letting Birds scooters fly free

    At that point I had everything I need to write a simple app to unlock the scooters, and it worked! For about 2 minutes, at which point the network would notice that the scooter was unlocked when it should be locked and sent a lock command to force disable the scooter again. Ah well. So, what else could I do? The next thing I tried was just modifying some STM firmware and flashing it onto a board. It still booted, indicating that there was no sort of verified boot process. Remember what I mentioned about the throttle being hooked through the STM32's analogue to digital converters[3]? A bit of hacking later and I had a board that would appear to work normally, but about a minute after starting the ride would cut the throttle. Alternative options are left as an exercise for the reader. Finally, there was the component I hadn't really looked at yet. The Quectel modem actually contains its own application processor that runs Linux, making it significantly more powerful than any of the chips actually running the scooter application[4]. The STM communicates with the modem over serial, sending it an AT command asking it to make an SSL connection to a remote endpoint. It then uses further AT commands to send data over this SSL connection, allowing it to talk to the internet without having any sort of IP stack. Figuring out just what was going over this connection was made slightly difficult by virtue of all the debug functionality having been ripped out of the STM's firmware, so in the end I took a more brute force approach - I identified the address of the function that sends data to the modem, hooked up OpenOCD to the SWD pins on the STM, ran OpenOCD's gdb stub, attached gdb, set a breakpoint for that function and then dumped the arguments being passed to that function. A couple of minutes later and I had a full transaction between the scooter and the remote. The scooter authenticates against the remote endpoint by sending its serial number and IMEI. You need to send both, but the IMEI didn't seem to need to be associated with the serial number at all. New connections seemed to take precedence over existing connections, so it would be simple to just pretend to be every scooter and hijack all the connections, resulting in scooter unlock commands being sent to you rather than to the scooter or allowing someone to send fake GPS data and make it impossible for users to find scooters.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (poppler, sudo, and wordpress), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), and SUSE (kernel and postgresql10).