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Programming: Tryton Unconference, Argonne Looks to Singularity for HPC Code Portability, Mitogen v0.2.4 and More Python Bits

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  • Tryton Unconference 2019: In Marseille on the 6th & 7th of June

    We will go in the sunny city of Marseille in south of France on the 6th and 7th of June. Contrary to previous editions of the Tryton Unconferences the coding sprint will be organized during the two days preceding the conference.

  • Argonne Looks to Singularity for HPC Code Portability

    Scaling code for massively parallel architectures is a common challenge the scientific community faces. When moving from a system used for development—a personal laptop, for instance, or even a university’s computing cluster—to a large-scale supercomputer like those housed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, researchers traditionally would only migrate the target application: the underlying software stack would be left behind.

    To help alleviate this problem, the ALCF has deployed the service Singularity. Singularity, an open-source framework originally developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and now supported by Sylabs Inc., is a tool for creating and running containers (platforms designed to package code and its dependencies so as to facilitate fast and reliable switching between computing environments)—albeit one intended specifically for scientific workflows and high-performance computing resources.

  • Mitogen v0.2.4 released

    Mitogen for Ansible v0.2.4 has been released. This version is noteworthy as it contains major refinements to the core libary and Ansible extension to improve its behaviour during larger Ansible runs.

    Work on scalability is far from complete, as it progresses towards inclusion of a patch held back since last summer to introduce per-CPU multiplexers. The current idea is to exhaust profiling gains from a single process before landing it, as all single-CPU gains continue to apply in that case, and there is much less risk of inefficiency being hidden in noise created by multiple multiplexer processes.

  • Introducing kids to computational thinking with Python
  • The Factory Method Pattern and Its Implementation in Python
  • PyDev of the Week: Paolo Melchiorre
  • Create a filter for the audio and image files with python
  • Some simple CodeWars problems

More in Tux Machines

Emmabuntus DE2 1.05 Released, Which Reduces ISO Image Size

Emmabuntus Team is pleased to announce the release of the new Emmabuntüs Debian Edition 2 1.05 (32 and 64 bits) on 02nd Aug, 2019. It’s based on Debian 9.9 stretch distribution and featuring the XFCE desktop environment. This is a lightweight distribution, which was designed to run on older computers. This distribution was originally designed to facilitate the reconditioning of computers donated to humanitarian organizations, starting with the Emmaüs communities. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Writing Kubernetes controllers the wrong way is still useful

    When you try to shoehorn an idea, approach, or code into a situation that's not expecting it, you get surprising and fun results. In his Lightning Talk at the 17th annual Southern California Linux Expo (SCaLE 17x), "Writing Kubernetes controllers 'the wrong way' is still useful," sysadmin Chris McEniry shares his experience with an out-of-cluster etcd-controller. Watch Chris' Lightning Talk to learn more about managing etcd controllers and living to tell the tale.

  • VMware's proposed Pivotal acquisition shows Cloud Foundry's strength

    Abby Kearns, executive director of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, reports that in the soon-to-be-released Cloud Foundry end-user survey, "In just two years, broad deployment of Cloud Foundry has nearly doubled. With 45% of our users describing their Cloud Foundry use as 'broad' (compared to 30% in 2018 and 23% in 2017)."

  • Magnetic Lasso for Krita is here

    I won’t say that I am done with Magnetic Lasso now, but the results are a lot better now to be honest. Take a look at one of the tests that I did,

  • [antiX] swapgs mitigations kernels available

    Latest secure kernels available in the repos for 32 and 64 bit architecture (stretch, buster, testing and sid). 5.2.8 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486) 4.19.66 (64bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486) 4.9.189 (64 bit and 32 bit pae and non-pae-486) Users are strongly advised to upgrade.

  • M5Stack M5StickV is a Tiny AI Camera for Maker Projects

Rust will offer refunds as they stop shipping Linux client

Multiplayer survival game Rust will soon stop shipping its Linux client and offer refunds to those who have played using it. They’ve penned a blog post explaining that it had become a “cheater’s sanctuary,” and that a September update addressing performance and security not being supported on the OS was the final straw, despite believing that supporting Linux is still “the right thing to do.” Read more

10 Best Terminal emulators for Linux that are worth giving a try

Terminal emulator on a Linux system does not need any introduction. It is one of the most important tools in a Linux system, all users know about. The Terminal emulator on Linux can be useful for installing a program, changing some system settings, opening a program or run any script and do any other small and big tasks on a Linux computer with just the appropriate command. Thus, it will not be wrong, if you call it the heart of a Linux system from a user’s perspective. Just like most other elements in a Linux system, a new Terminal emulator can also be installed and used. So, without any further delay, let’s get started with the top 10 alternatives to the default Linux Terminal emulator and the reasons you should opt for them. Read more