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The Official Ubuntu 19.04 Wallpaper Is Revealed

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Ubuntu

Say aloha to Ubuntu’s new desktop background, the one that you, me, and thousands of other Ubuntu users will stare at for the next six months.

Every new Ubuntu release ships with a new desktop wallpaper (well, almost; Ubuntu 14.10 didn’t) and the upcoming release of Ubuntu 19.04 is no exception.

It’s something of a design tradition, but it’s also practical: distinct desktop wallpapers make it far easier to ‘spot’ Ubuntu in use in the wild!

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Ubuntu 19.04 Default Background Wallpaper Is Revealed

  • Ubuntu 19.04 Default Background Wallpaper Is Revealed

    The default background wallpaper of Ubuntu 19.04 is revealed. One in colour, one in black and white.

    Ubuntu 19.04, codename ‘Disco Dingo’, will be released on April 18, 2019. It will ship with Linux Kernel 5.0 and Gnome 3.32 (due in spring).

    Now the default background wallpaper for Gnome desktop is available.

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