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New Features And Improvements In GNOME 3.32

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GNOME

Also, while not part of the core GNOME, a new Desktop Icons extension was released, which restores traditional desktop icons for users wanting this functionality. The extension has multi-monitor support, and it offers everything you'd need, from thumbnails, and symlinks, to keyboard shortcuts for selection, renaming, and so on. What's more, this extension supports Wayland too, as opposed to Files (Nautilus) which only worked with X11.

The GNOME 3.32 changes presented in this article are only the most prominent in this release, but there are many more smaller improvements and fixes.

The GNOME 3.32 desktop should be made available soon after its release in rolling Linux distributions like Arch Linux. It will also be available with the next Ubuntu and Fedora releases (Ubuntu 19.04 / Fedora 30), and other Linux distributions shipping with the GNOME desktop.

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New GNOME is about to be released

  • A Look At The Many Improvements & New Features In GNOME 3.32

    Barring any last minute delays, GNOME 3.32 is expected to ship today as the latest six-month update to this popular open-source desktop environment. GNOME 3.32 personally has me quite excited more so for the improvements -- and bug fixes -- over "new" features, but here is a look at some of what there is to get excited about with this latest update to the GNOME 3 desktop.

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