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GNOME 3.34 "Thessaloniki" Desktop Environment Slated for Release on September 11

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GNOME

The GNOME Project, through Andre Klapper, announced that the release schedule of the upcoming GNOME 3.34 desktop environment was finalized and it's now available for general public.

With the final release of the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment knocking on our doors, the time has come to take a look at the release schedule of the next major release of the open-source graphical desktop environment used by numerous Linux-based operating systems, including Ubuntu.

According to the release schedule, the development cycle of the GNOME 3.34 desktop environment series will kick off soon after GNOME 3.32 release hits the streets tomorrow, March 13th, and it'll take place under the GNOME 3.33.x umbrella. The first development snapshot, GNOME 3.33.1, will be released to the public on April 24th.

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Cast To TV v8

  • Cast To TV v8 GNOME Extension Adds Support For Multiple Chromecasts, Automatic Subtitles Encoding

    Cast to TV, a GNOME extension to cast videos, music and pictures to Chromecast or other devices over the local network, has been updated to v8, with some important additions.

    Cast to TV v8 brings support for multiple Chromecast devices. To select the Chromecast device that is used for casting local media, open the extension settings, click the refresh icon next to the "Chromecast selection" item, and the drop-down next to it will be populated with a list of Chromecast devices available on the local network.

    Another important addition is automatic subtitles encoding. Previously, the Cast to TV settings had an option which allowed users to manually select the subtitles encoding - since this is done automatically now, the character encoding option has been removed from its settings.

The GNOME 3.34 Release Date is Set

  • The GNOME 3.34 Release Date is Set

    The GNOME 3.34 release date is set, and the full release schedule for the new development cycle finalised.

    It won’t be easy for developers to top the recent GNOME 3.32 release, which has been met with near-universal praise for its performance patches and feature refinements.

    But follow it they must.

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