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GNOME 3.32 Released

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GNOME
  • GNOME 3.32 Released

    The latest version of GNOME 3 has been released today. Version 3.32 contains six months of work by the GNOME community and includes many improvements, performance improvements and new features.

    This release features a refreshed visual style ranging from an entirely new set of app icons to improvements to the user interface style. Many of the base style colors have been saturated, giving them a more vivid, vibrant appearance. Buttons are more rounded and have a softer “shadow” border. Switches no longer use the explicit ON and OFF text, instead using color to indicate state.

  • The Faster & More Beautiful GNOME 3.32 Has Been Released

    GNOME 3.32, which is codenamed "Taipei" given the location of GNOME.Asia Summit 2018, has been officially released on time.

    The GNOME folks have officially announced 3.32 as the latest version of the GNOME 3 stack.

    From this morning you can see our favorite changes and new features of GNOME 3.32... The biggest highlights are fractional scaling support, performance improvements, and a lot of bug fixing.

  • GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" Desktop Environment Officially Released, Here's What's New

    Six months in development, the GNOME 3.32 desktop environment is finally here to upgrade your GNOME experience to the next level by adding lots of new features, fixing bugs from previous versions, improving existing components and apps, as well as polishing the look and feel of the user interface.

    With the GNOME 3.32 release, the GNOME desktop becomes flatter, lighter, and more modern. After upgrading, users will notice that the App Menus are no longer available and their content was moved to other places, there are changes to the buttons, header bars, and switches, as well as more consistent colors and new app icons.

GNOME 3.32 Released, This is What’s New

  • GNOME 3.32 Released, This is What’s New

    GNOME 3.32, out today, brings a crop of new features and enhancements to the Linux desktop.

    The update includes a new icon set and theme refresh, rolls in a bunch of (much needed) performance patches, and includes new versions of core apps, like the Nautilus file manager.

    In all, it’s a major upgrade. And, as this is the world’s most popular free, open-source desktop environment, a major upgrade of the GNOME desktop is major news to its millions of users.

    There’s plenty more to learn about, so join us as we take a look at the best new features of GNOME 3.32.

Brian Fagioli the Latest to Cover the GNOME Release

  • GNOME 3.32 'Taipei' is finally here! The best Linux desktop environment gets even better

    Whether or not a desktop environment is "best" is subjective. In other words, not all people prefer the same DE. Some folks like GNOME, others are KDE Plasma fans, and some Linux users choose something else. With that said, GNOME is the best. It is not debatable -- please accept this fact. GNOME simply offers the most sensical user interface while also being beautiful. Look, when Canonical killed the much-maligned Unity, what DE was chosen as the new default DE for Ubuntu? Exactly -- GNOME. Hell, GNOME bests both macOS and Windows 10 too.

    Today, the best gets even better as GNOME 3.32 "Taipei" is finally here! The DE finally gets one of the most desired features -- fractional scaling. While technically just experimental for now, it will allow users to better scale their desktops when using a HiDPI monitor. Speaking of appearances, GNOME finally gets refreshed icons, and yes, that matters. They look amazing and modern. Also cool? The on-screen keyboard has an emoji picker! User images are now all circular too, lending to a more cohesive and consistent feel. The excellent GNOME Software is getting an update too, with more transparent details about app permissions.

More on GNOME 3.32 ‘Taipei’

  • GNOME 3.32 ‘Taipei’ Linux Desktop Released With New Features

    he GNOME Foundation has released the latest version of GNOME desktop environment, i.e., GNOME 3.32 ‘Taipei’. GNOME arguably the most popular Linux desktop around and many mainstream distributions — including Ubuntu, Fedora, and openSUSE — feature the same.

    The latest version is the result of a six-month-long development process and it incorporates a total 26,438 changes made by about 798 developers.

By Packt Hub

GNOME 3.32 Now Available

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More in Tux Machines

Software: NetworkManager, Browsers, Microsoft Powerpoint Alternatives and Guix Substitutes

  • NetworkManager Now Supports Making OVS DPDK Interfaces, Other Work For 1.20
    NetworkManager 1.19.4 is the newest snapshot of this widely used Linux networking library on its road to version 1.20. NetworkManager 1.19.4 was tagged last week as the latest stepping stone towards the NetworkManager 1.20 stable release. A new feature also making it into NM this past week was support for creating OVS DPDK interfaces -- that's the Open vSwitch Data Plane Development Kit. Open vSwitch's DPDK path allows for lower-latency and higher-performance connectivity between OpenStack compute node instances and now with NetworkManager 1.20 is this better OVS-DPDK integration.
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    Tor is another great browser heavily focused on user privacy and security. It’s available for Windows, MacOS, and GNU/Linux in 32-bit and 64-bit versions that are constantly updated. Its main focus is on anonymity. Based on a modified Firefox ESR, it contains things like NoScript and HTTPS-Everywhere. The browser works in a network that promises to protect a user‘s browsing history, location, messages, and any online personal data from people or bots that perform network traffic analysis. Tor network is a web of servers operated by volunteers. Their aim is to keep browsing data as secure as it can be. With Tor, you don’t have to worry about browsing history, saved passwords or auto-completion data. Also, it’s worth mentioning that Tor is the only browser that uses onion services. This means that users can publish websites and other services without revealing the location.
  • Microsoft Powerpoint Alternatives For Linux
    This post is for you if you are looking for the best alternative to Microsoft powerpoint alternatives for Linux operating systems. Microsoft’s office suite is one of the most popular software after Microsoft Windows and there won’t be any objection if we say that Windows is popular because of the MS office suite.
  • Substitutes are now available as lzip
    For a long time, our build farm at ci.guix.gnu.org has been delivering substitutes (pre-built binaries) compressed with gzip. Gzip was never the best choice in terms of compression ratio, but it was a reasonable and convenient choice: it’s rock-solid, and zlib made it easy for us to have Guile bindings to perform in-process compression in our multi-threaded guix publish server. With the exception of building software from source, downloads take the most time of Guix package upgrades. If users can download less, upgrades become faster, and happiness ensues. Time has come to improve on this, and starting from early June, Guix can publish and fetch lzip-compressed substitutes, in addition to gzip.

Red Hat's OpenShift and Fedora's Latest

  • Enhanced OpenShift Red Hat AMQ Broker container image for monitoring
    Previously, I blogged about how to enhance your JBoss AMQ 6 container image for production: I explained how to externalise configuration and add Prometheus monitoring. While I already covered the topic well, I had to deal with this topic for version 7.2 of Red Hat AMQ Broker recently, and as things have slightly changed for this new release, I think it deserves an updated blog post! This post is a walk-through on how to enhance the base Red Hat AMQ Broker container image to add monitoring. This time we’ll see how much easier it is to provide customizations, even without writing a new Dockerfile. We will even go a step further by providing a Grafana dashboard sample for visualising the broker metrics.
  • Event Report - Fedora Meetup 15th June 2019, Pune, India
    We started planning for this one month back. Since we are doing this meetup regularly now, most of the things were known, only execution was required.
  • Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1
    It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

today's howtos

SUSE: SLE 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1 and More

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1
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    This week I am attending the International Supercomputing conference in Frankfurt, and I am in awe of the scientists and researchers that are here and their ability to dig in and understand super complex problems in very specialized areas.  While I am humbled by the world-changing work represented at a conference like this, I am also honored to be playing a small part in their success.  With the next iteration of SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing 15 SP1, we’ve expanded and refreshed our bundle of popular HPC tools and libraries that we make available along with every subscription to our SLE HPC operating system.