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LF Members, News and Events

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  • OpenChain Project Adds Fujitsu as Platinum Member

    The OpenChain Project, which builds trust in open source by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent, announced today at Linux Foundation’s Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS), that Fujitsu has joined as a Platinum member.

    Fujitsu joins other recent Platinum member additions including Bosch, Microsoft, Uber, Google and Facebook. OpenChain provides a specification as well as overarching processes, policies and training that companies need to be successful in managing open source license compliance so that it becomes more efficient, understandable and predictable for participants of the software supply chain.

    As code flows between companies that consume billions of lines of open source software through their supply chains to build new products and services, a key challenge is ensuring the relevant license requirements are met in a timely and effective manner. The OpenChain Project provides a consistent way to address that and other challenges. Conformance with the OpenChain Specification shows that an organization follows the key requirements of a quality open source compliance program, and builds trust between organizations in the supply chain. It makes procurement easier for purchasers and preferred status easier for suppliers.

  • Tetrate Emerges With Enterprise Service Mesh Platform

    The open-source Envoy project is part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) and was originally developed by ride sharing company Lyft. Envoy is a service mesh reverse proxy technology that is used to help scale microservices data traffic. Multiple vendors, including Google, IBM, AWS, F5 Networks, Avi Networks and VMware, have embraced the Istio and Envoy model and have announced their own services based on the technology.

    Alongside Tetrate's official launch, the company also announced that it has raised $12.5 million in funding led by Dell Technologies Capital with participation from 8VC, Intel Capital, Rain Capital and Samsung NEXT.

  • Cloud Native Computing Foundation Announces Schedule for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2019

    T​he Cloud Native Computing Foundation, which sustains and integrates open source technologies like Kubernetes® and Prometheus, today announced the session line-up for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe on May 20-23, 2019, in Barcelona. The event features real-world case studies using Kubernetes and other cloud native technologies from experts at ADMIRALTY, Booking.com, British Telecom, Carnegie Mellon, eBay, Engel & Völkers Technology, ING, LinkedIn, LSST & French National Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics (IN2P3), Mediakind, McKesson, VTT, and more.

    After the largest ever KubeCon last December in Seattle with more than 8,000 attendees,  KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe will bring together more than 10,000 technologists from thriving open source communities across the world to further collaboration around cloud native computing. Maintainers and end users of CNCF’s hosted projects – including Kubernetes, Prometheus, Envoy, CoreDNS, containerd, OpenTracing, Fluentd, gRPC, rkt, CNI, Jaeger, Notary, TUF, Vitess, NATS, Rook, Harbor, etcd, Linkerd, and Helm – and other cloud native technologies will gather for four days to share insights and encourage participation in this fast growing ecosystem. Register for KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe by March 20 to save up to $300.

The Linux Foundation Launches Continuous Delivery Foundation

  • The Linux Foundation Launches Continuous Delivery Foundation

    The first projects to be hosted under the auspices of CDF, which was launched at the Open Source Leadership Summit conference, includes Jenkins, the open source CI/CD system, and Jenkins X, an open source CI/CD solution on Kubernetes. Both were developed by CloudBees. Netflix and Google, meanwhile, are contributing Spinnaker, an open source multi-cloud CD solution, and Google is also adding Tekton, an open source project and specification for creating CI/CD components.

    Additional projects are expected to join CDF once a Technical Oversight Committee (TOC) is formally named.

    Founding members of the CDF include Alauda, Alibaba, Anchore, Armory, Autodesk, Capital One, CircleCI, CloudBees, DeployHub, GitLab, Google, Huawei, JFrog, Netflix, Puppet, Red Hat, SAP and Snyk.

    Chris Aniszczyk, vice president of developer relations for The Linux Foundation, said that while a lot of progress has been made over the years regarding adoption of CI, the challenges associated with mastering CD have proven more vexing. To address that issue, the CDF will evangelize CI/CD and DevOps methodologies, define and document best practices, provide guidelines and create training materials to better enable organizations to implement CI/CD best practices.

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More in Tux Machines

A Look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta and Report From Akademy 2019

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    In this video, we look at KDE Plasma 5.17 Beta, enjoy!

  • TSDgeos' blog: Akademy 2019

    It's 10 days already since Akademy 2019 finished and I'm already missing it :/ Akademy is a week-long action-packed conference, talks, BoFs, daytrip, dinner with old and new friends, it's all a great combination and shows how amazing KDE (yes, the community, that's our name) is. On the talks side i missed some that i wanted to attend because i had to extend my time at the registration booth helping fellow KDE people that had forgotten to register (yes, our setup could be a bit easier, doesn't help that you have to register for talks, for travel support and for the actual conference in three different places), but I am not complaining, you get to interact with lots of people in the registration desk, it's a good way to meet people you may not have met otherwise, so please make sure you volunteer next year ;) One of the talks i want to highlight is Dan VrĂĄtil's talk about C++, I agree with him that we could do much better in making our APIs more expressive using the power of "modern" C++ (when do we stop it calling modern?). It's a pity that the slides are not up so you'll have to live with KĂŠvin Ottens sketch of it for now.

Programming Leftovers

  • DevNation Live: Event-driven business automation powered by cloud-native Java

    DevNation Live tech talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions and code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, presented by Red Hat’s Maciej Swiderski, Principal Software Engineer, and Burr Sutter, Chief Developer Evangelist, you’ll learn about event-driven business automation using Kogito, Quarkus, and more. Kogito is a new Java toolkit, based on Drools and jBPM, that’s made to bring rules and processes to the Quarkus world. This DevNation Live presentation shows how Kogito can be used to build cloud-ready, event-driven business applications, and it includes a demo of implementing the business logic of a complex domain. Kogito itself is defined as a cloud-native business automation toolkit that helps you to build intelligent applications. It’s way more than just a business process or a single business rule—it’s a bunch of business rules, and it’s based on battle-tested capabilities.

  • NVIDIA Video Codec SDK 9.1 Brings CUDA CUStream Support, Other Encoder Improvements

    Following the February release of Video Codec SDK 9.0, NVIDIA recently did a quiet release of the Video Codec SDK 9.1 update that furthers along this cross-platform video encode/decode library.

  • Mike Driscoll: PyDev of the Week: Peter Farrell

    This week we welcome Peter Farrell (@hackingmath) as our PyDev of the Week! Peter is the author Math Adventures with Python and two other math related Python books. You can learn more about Peter by visiting his website.

  • Mutation testing by example: How to leverage failure
  • Reuven Lerner: Looking for Python podcast co-hosts

    As you might know, I’m a panelist on the weekly “Freelancers Show” podcast, which talks about the business of freelancing. The good news: The same company that’s behind the Freelancers Show, Devchat.tv, is putting together a weekly podcast about Python, and I’m going to be on that, too! We’ll have a combination of discussion, interviews with interesting people in the Python community, and (friendly) debates over the current and future state of the language.

  • Getting started with data science using Python

    Data science is an exciting new field in computing that's built around analyzing, visualizing, correlating, and interpreting the boundless amounts of information our computers are collecting about the world. Of course, calling it a "new" field is a little disingenuous because the discipline is a derivative of statistics, data analysis, and plain old obsessive scientific observation. But data science is a formalized branch of these disciplines, with processes and tools all its own, and it can be broadly applied across disciplines (such as visual effects) that had never produced big dumps of unmanageable data before. Data science is a new opportunity to take a fresh look at data from oceanography, meteorology, geography, cartography, biology, medicine and health, and entertainment industries and gain a better understanding of patterns, influences, and causality. Like other big and seemingly all-inclusive fields, it can be intimidating to know where to start exploring data science. There are a lot of resources out there to help data scientists use their favorite programming languages to accomplish their goals, and that includes one of the most popular programming languages out there: Python. Using the Pandas, Matplotlib, and Seaborn libraries, you can learn the basic toolset of data science.

Excellent Utilities: Liquid Prompt – adaptive prompt for Bash & Zsh

This is a new series highlighting best-of-breed utilities. We’re covering a wide range of utilities including tools that boost your productivity, help you manage your workflow, and lots more besides. There’s a complete list of the tools in this series in the Summary section. The Command Line Interface (CLI) is a way of interacting with your computer. And if you ever want to harness all the power of Linux, it’s highly recommended to master it. It’s true the CLI is often perceived as a barrier for users migrating to Linux, particularly if they’re grown up using GUI software exclusively. While Linux rarely forces anyone to use the CLI, some tasks are better suited to this method of interaction, offering inducements like superior scripting opportunities, remote access, and being far more frugal with a computer’s resources. For anyone spending time at the CLI, they’ll rely on the shell prompt. My favorite shell is Bash. By default, the configuration for Bash on popular distributions identifies the user name, hostname, and the current working directory. All essential information. But with Liquid Prompt you can display additional information such as battery status, CPU temperature, and much more. Read more

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