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Red Hat and SUSE: Drools, Systemd, Libinput, Fedora and Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0

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  • Quarking Drools: How we turned a 13-year-old Java project into a first-class serverless component

    Rule-based artificial intelligence (AI) is often overlooked, possibly because people think it’s only useful in heavyweight enterprise software products. However, that’s not necessarily true. Simply put, a rule engine is just a piece of software that allows you to separate domain and business-specific constraint from the main application flow. We are part of the team developing and maintaining Drools—the world’s most popular open source rule engine and part of Red Hat—and, in this article, we will describe how we are changing Drools to make it part of the cloud and serverless revolution.

  • Why feedback, not metrics, is critical to DevOps

    Most managers and agile coaches depend on metrics over feedback from their teams, users, and even customers. In fact, quite a few use feedback and metrics synonymously, where they present feedback from teams or customers as a bunch of numbers or a graphical representation of those numbers. This is not only unfortunate, but it can be misleading as it presents only part of the story and not the entire truth.

  • L2TP Tunnel Support Added To Systemd

    The newest feature addition for systemd is supporting L2TP, the Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol, as part of its networking code. 

    Systemd's networkd now has support merged for LT2TP tunnel support. L2TP can be used for extending a local area network (LAN) or also for VPN purposes when paired with the likes of IPsec for providing encryption. L2TP also has a variety of other use-cases with this bare protocol able to offer a layer two link over an L3 network.

  • libinput 1.12.901
    The first RC for libinput 1.13 is now available.
    
    
    
    
    Only two notable features in this release but patches are accumulating on
    master, it's been 6 months since 1.12 and I've decided to postpone the two
    major features (hi-res scrolling and totem support) to 1.14.
    
    
    
    
    Touch arbitration has improved for tablets, especially on touch screens.
    A timer set on pen proximity out means we don't get ghost touches anymore
    when the hand lifts off slower than the pen itself. And location-based touch
    arbitration means that parts of the screen can be interacted with even while
    the pen is in proximity. libinput uses the tilt information where
    available to disable touches in a rectangle around the pen where the hand is
    likely to be but leaves the rest of the touchscreen available otherwise.
    Where the UI supports it, this allows for bimanual interaction.
    
    
    
    
    The test suite is installed on demand (meson -Dinstall-tests=true). Where
    run from the installed location it will use the normal library lookups and
    the quirks directory as defined by the prefix. This makes it useful for
    distribution-level testing, i.e. run this on a test machine after updating
    the package to make sure everything is as expected. Where available, you can
    invoke it with the "libinput test-suite" command.
    
    
    
    
    Other than that, a load of fixes, quirks added, cleanups, tidy-ups and so on
    an so forth.
    
    
    
    
    As usual, the git shortlog is below. Many thanks to all the contributors.
  • Libinput 1.13 Is Coming But High-Resolution Scrolling & Dell Totem Support Delayed

    Libinput is fairly mature at this stage for offering a unified input handling library for use on both X.Org and Wayland Linux desktops. Libinput has largely reached a feature plateau with new releases no longer coming out so often and no glaring gaps in support. With it already being a half-year since the last major release, libinput 1.13 is now being buttoned up for release and available today is the first release candidate. 

    Libinput 1.13 isn't that exciting of a release particularly since maintainer Peter Hutterer of Red Hat decided to delay the high resolution scrolling support. The Linux 5.0 kernel brought the much anticipated high resolution scrolling support for various Logitech/Microsoft mice to improve the scroll-wheel experience. Besides the kernel support, there is also the user-space support that needs updating. Peter decided to delay this functionality now until Libinput 1.14 to give it more time to bake.

  • New package in Fedora: python-xslxwriter
  • First Public Beta for SUSE Manager 4.0!

More in Tux Machines

Audiocasts/Shows: mintCast, Test and Code, LINUX Unplugged

Security: Mozilla Patch for Firefox and Getting Started with OpenSSL

  • Zero-Day Flaw In Firefox Is Getting Exploited By Hackers; Update Now!
    Mozilla has issued a warning of a zero-day flaw in Firefox browser that is currently being exploited in the wild. But the good news is that an emergency patch has been released for the same so you should update your browser now! The vulnerability was discovered by Google’s Project Zero security team...
  • Security vulnerabilities fixed in Firefox 67.0.3 and Firefox ESR 60.7.1
    A type confusion vulnerability can occur when manipulating JavaScript objects due to issues in Array.pop. This can allow for an exploitable crash. We are aware of targeted attacks in the wild abusing this flaw.
  • Getting started with OpenSSL: Cryptography basics
    This article is the first of two on cryptography basics using OpenSSL, a production-grade library and toolkit popular on Linux and other systems. (To install the most recent version of OpenSSL, see here.) OpenSSL utilities are available at the command line, and programs can call functions from the OpenSSL libraries. The sample program for this article is in C, the source language for the OpenSSL libraries. The two articles in this series cover—collectively—cryptographic hashes, digital signatures, encryption and decryption, and digital certificates. You can find the code and command-line examples in a ZIP file from my website. Let’s start with a review of the SSL in the OpenSSL name.

Python: Leading, Developing for Android and New RCs

  • Leading in the Python community
    Naomi began her career in the Classics; she earned a PhD in Latin and Ancient Greek with a minor in Indo-European Linguistics, as she says, "several decades ago." While teaching Latin at a private school, she began tinkering with computers, learning to code and to take machines apart to do upgrades and repairs. She started working with open source software in 1995 with Yggdrasil Linux and helped launch the Fort Wayne, Indiana, Linux User Group.
  • What’s the Best Language for Android App Developers: Java or Python?
    Few things can be so divisive among developers as their choice of programming languages. Developers will promote one over the other, often touting their chosen language’s purity, speed, elegance, efficiency, power, portability, compatibility or any number of other features. Android app developers are no exception, with many developers divided between using Java or Python to develop their applications. Let’s look at these two languages and see which is best for Android app developers.
  • Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available
    Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available. 3.7.4rc1 is the release preview of the next maintenance release of Python 3.7, the latest feature release of Python. 3.6.9rc1 is the release preview of the first security-fix release of Python 3.6. Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2019-06-28, no code changes are planned between these release candidates and the final releases. These release candidates are intended to give you the opportunity to test the new security and bug fixes in 3.7.4 and security fixes in 3.6.9. We strongly encourage you to test your projects and report issues found to bugs.python.org as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that these are preview releases and, thus, their use is not recommended for production environments.

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