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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • AMDGPU For Linux 5.1 Tweaks The Golden Settings For Vega, Corrects Fiji Power Reading

    Since last week the big set of DRM driver changes has been part of the mainline kernel for Linux 5.1 while working its way to mainline now are a couple of early fixes to the AMDGPU driver.

  • Krita 4.2.0: the First Painting Application to bring HDR Support to Windows

    We’re deep in bug fixing mode now, because in May we want to release the next major version of Krita: Krita 4.2.0. While there will be a host of new features, a plethora of bug fixes and performance improvements, one thing is unique: support for painting in HDR mode. Krita is the very first application, open source or proprietary, that offers this!

    So, today we release a preview version of Krita 4.2.0 with HDR support baked in, so you can give the new functionality a try!

    Of course, at this moment, only Windows 10 supports HDR monitors, and only with some very specific hardware. Your CPU and GPU need to be new enough, and you need to have a monitor that supports HDR. We know that the brave folks at Intel are working on HDR support for Linux, though!

  • Ubuntu Desktop To Auto-Install Necessary VM Tools/Drivers When Running On VMware

    In seeking to improve the out-of-the-box experience when running the Ubuntu desktop as a guest virtual machine within VMware's products, Ubuntu is planning on having the open-vm-tools-desktop package be automatically installed for providing a better initial experience. 

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  • QA Report: February 2019
  • Amazon steps up its open-source game, and Elastic stock falls as a result

    Open-source search software company Elastic saw its stock fall as much as 5 percent on Tuesday after Amazon Web Services announced the launch of a separate library of open-source code for Elasticsearch, a set of technologies that can be use to build search engines for web sites, and an important part of Elastic's business.

  • MongoDB backs off unpopular license; MDB +4%

    Key quote: "We continue to believe that the SSPL complies with the Open Source Definition and the four essential software freedoms. However, based on its reception by the members of this list and the greater open source community, the community consensus required to support OSI approval does not currently appear to exist regarding the copyleft provision of SSPL. Thus, in order to be respectful of the time and efforts of the OSI board and this list’s members, we are hereby withdrawing the SSPL from OSI consideration."

  • When "Zoë" !== "Zoë". Or why you need to normalize Unicode strings

    It first hit me many years ago, when I was building an app (in Objective-C) that imported a list of people from an user’s address book and social media graph, and filtered out duplicates. In certain situations, I would see the same person added twice because the names wouldn’t compare as equal strings.

    In fact, while the two strings above look identical on screen, the way they’re represented on disk, the bytes saved in the file, are different. In the first “Zoë”, the ë character (e with umlaut) was represented a single Unicode code point, while in the second case it was in the decomposed form. If you’re dealing with Unicode strings in your application, you need to take into account that characters could be represented in multiple ways.

More in Tux Machines

Software: NetworkManager, Browsers, Microsoft Powerpoint Alternatives and Guix Substitutes

  • NetworkManager Now Supports Making OVS DPDK Interfaces, Other Work For 1.20
    NetworkManager 1.19.4 is the newest snapshot of this widely used Linux networking library on its road to version 1.20. NetworkManager 1.19.4 was tagged last week as the latest stepping stone towards the NetworkManager 1.20 stable release. A new feature also making it into NM this past week was support for creating OVS DPDK interfaces -- that's the Open vSwitch Data Plane Development Kit. Open vSwitch's DPDK path allows for lower-latency and higher-performance connectivity between OpenStack compute node instances and now with NetworkManager 1.20 is this better OVS-DPDK integration.
  • 4 best browsers that don't save your history and personal data [Ed: Microsoft Windows advocacy sites cannot recommend Microsoft anything for privacy]
    Tor is another great browser heavily focused on user privacy and security. It’s available for Windows, MacOS, and GNU/Linux in 32-bit and 64-bit versions that are constantly updated. Its main focus is on anonymity. Based on a modified Firefox ESR, it contains things like NoScript and HTTPS-Everywhere. The browser works in a network that promises to protect a user‘s browsing history, location, messages, and any online personal data from people or bots that perform network traffic analysis. Tor network is a web of servers operated by volunteers. Their aim is to keep browsing data as secure as it can be. With Tor, you don’t have to worry about browsing history, saved passwords or auto-completion data. Also, it’s worth mentioning that Tor is the only browser that uses onion services. This means that users can publish websites and other services without revealing the location.
  • Microsoft Powerpoint Alternatives For Linux
    This post is for you if you are looking for the best alternative to Microsoft powerpoint alternatives for Linux operating systems. Microsoft’s office suite is one of the most popular software after Microsoft Windows and there won’t be any objection if we say that Windows is popular because of the MS office suite.
  • Substitutes are now available as lzip
    For a long time, our build farm at ci.guix.gnu.org has been delivering substitutes (pre-built binaries) compressed with gzip. Gzip was never the best choice in terms of compression ratio, but it was a reasonable and convenient choice: it’s rock-solid, and zlib made it easy for us to have Guile bindings to perform in-process compression in our multi-threaded guix publish server. With the exception of building software from source, downloads take the most time of Guix package upgrades. If users can download less, upgrades become faster, and happiness ensues. Time has come to improve on this, and starting from early June, Guix can publish and fetch lzip-compressed substitutes, in addition to gzip.

Red Hat's OpenShift and Fedora's Latest

  • Enhanced OpenShift Red Hat AMQ Broker container image for monitoring
    Previously, I blogged about how to enhance your JBoss AMQ 6 container image for production: I explained how to externalise configuration and add Prometheus monitoring. While I already covered the topic well, I had to deal with this topic for version 7.2 of Red Hat AMQ Broker recently, and as things have slightly changed for this new release, I think it deserves an updated blog post! This post is a walk-through on how to enhance the base Red Hat AMQ Broker container image to add monitoring. This time we’ll see how much easier it is to provide customizations, even without writing a new Dockerfile. We will even go a step further by providing a Grafana dashboard sample for visualising the broker metrics.
  • Event Report - Fedora Meetup 15th June 2019, Pune, India
    We started planning for this one month back. Since we are doing this meetup regularly now, most of the things were known, only execution was required.
  • Outreachy with Fedora Happiness Packets: Phase 1
    It’s been around 20 days that I have been working on an Outreachy internship project with The Fedora Project. I have been working on some of the pending issues, miscellaneous bugs and cleaning up code in Fedora Happiness Packets. This month has been quite fun, which includes great learning through the entire process

today's howtos

SUSE: SLE 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1 and More

  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 12 Service Pack 5 Beta 1
  • A demo based introduction to SUSE Cloud Application Platform
    At the recent SUSECON conference in Nashville, Peter Andersson and Peter Lunderbye from SUSE demonstrated SUSE Cloud Application Platform, including pushing your first app, buildpacks: what are they and how they can be utilised, scaling and how easy the platform makes it, and how to improve resiliency and availability of your app. SUSE has posted all recorded talks from SUSECON on YouTube. Check them out if you want to learn more about what SUSE has to offer. We’re not just Linux anymore! I’ll be posting more SUSE Cloud Application Platform talks here over the coming days.
  • Enabling Discoveries with AI and HPC (and the Rise of Helium)
    This week I am attending the International Supercomputing conference in Frankfurt, and I am in awe of the scientists and researchers that are here and their ability to dig in and understand super complex problems in very specialized areas.  While I am humbled by the world-changing work represented at a conference like this, I am also honored to be playing a small part in their success.  With the next iteration of SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing 15 SP1, we’ve expanded and refreshed our bundle of popular HPC tools and libraries that we make available along with every subscription to our SLE HPC operating system.