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Games: Universim, You Died but a Necromancer, The Savior's Gang

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Gaming
  • The Universim continues to evolve the Modern Age in the latest build

    The Universim is a very impressive Early Access god sim and this latest update expands it that little bit further.

    For those who haven't played it before, it's a "new breed of God Game" from Crytivo that was originally funded on Kickstarter. Progress in the last year has really been impressive, with tons of new stuff coming in. This update,Global Warning Patch v0.0.31, adds in a lot more visual tweaks and additions for when you reach the Modern Age as well as more additions to the Medieval Age.

  • You Died but a Necromancer revived you looks fun, coming to Linux later this year

    You Died but a Necromancer revived you looks like one of those titles that will be equal parts fun and enraging as you avoid traps across multiple small levels.

    A casual game from developer BolHut, it has you and up to three friends try to navigate narrow pathways full of chainsaws, spikes, cannons, flamethrowers and so on to reach the end.

  • The Savior's Gang you lead a group of worshippers to the promised land, hopefully without killing them

    The Savior's Gang from Catness Game Studios takes some tales from the Bible, tears out some pages and spreads in a bunch of Monty Python styled humour.

    I was sent a key by the developer and since I do love ridiculous games I gave it a shot. I will be honest right away though, I didn't really like it. The basic idea is good, the humour isn't bad but the actual gameplay mechanics are really tedious.

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