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GIMP 2.10.10 Released

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  • GIMP 2.10.10 Released

    We haven’t had any updates for a few months but the wait is hopefully worth it! We’ve got many nice new features, optimizations, and stability fixes in this release!

  • GIMP 2.10.10 Released With Minor Features Added & Other Improvements

    GIMP 2.10.10 was released today as the first stable release for this open-source image manipulation program since last November when GIMP 2.10.8 released.

    While most of you are probably looking forward most to GIMP 3.0 with the long-awaited GTK3 port, that release isn't yet on the horizon but at least GIMP 2.10.10's release this Sunday brings some feature additions and other usability enhancements for this widely-used cross-platform program.

  • GIMP 2.10.10 Released With Smart Colorization, Transformation Tools Improvements

    GIMP 2.10.10 comes with 3 Bucket Fill tool improvements. The most important one is a new Fill by line art detection (smart colorization) option. This was initially created for the G'MIC plugin suite, and it consists on an algorithm that fills areas surrounded by line arts without leaving unfilled pixels near the lines, while also closing not properly closed (holes in the lines) zones, so the color doesn't leak outside. This feature is explained in detail on girinstud.io.

    It's now also possible to pick colors by using Ctrl + left click (while the Bucket Fill tool is selected), without having to select the Color Picker tool.

    And the last Bucket Fill improvement is the ability to continue filling more areas by keeping the mouse button down while using Fill similar colors and Fill by line art detection modes.

    Another interesting enhancement in GIMP 2.10.10 is the ability to use the Healing tool to paint changes on a different layer so the original remains unchanged, using the Sample merged option. The Heal tool has had this option in a very long time, but it didn't actually work until this new GIMP 2.10.10 version. The Clone tool, which already had this option, was updated to work in a similar way.

GIMP Image Editor 2.10.10 Released! (How to Install)

GIMP 2.10.10 Now Available

Linux Release Roundup, Including Major Updates to DeaDBeeF&GIMP

  • Linux Release Roundup, Including Major Updates to DeaDBeeF & GIMP

    A major update to the world’s favourite open-source raster graphics editor The GIMP is now available to download.

    GIMP 2.10.10 arrives with a number of notable feature upgrades and tool improvements, including:

    Line art detection in the Bucket Fill tool
    Sample Merged option in the Heal tool
    32-bit per channel precision for parametric brushes
    Easier brush and pattern creation workflow
    Scale tool now scales from the center
    “Readjust” option in various transformation tools
    On-canvas layer selection using the ALT key
    Quick colour picking using CTRL key
    Faster saving/exporting

GIMP 2.10.10 Now Available for Download

  • GIMP 2.10.10 Now Available for Download on Linux, Windows, and Mac

    As explained in the official announcement here, the new version of GIMP comes with new features, optimizations, and stability fixes, so there’s a lot to discover after installing the update.

    You can check out the full changelog in the box after the jump.

    One of the highlights concerns the Bucket Fill tool which received a new mode called “Fill by line art detection.” As the developing team explains, “[this] is a new algorithm for painters, allowing to fill areas surrounded by “line arts”, while trying to leave no unfilled pixels near the lines, and closing potential zones.”

GIMP 2.10.10 Image Editor released

  • GIMP 2.10.10 Image Editor released

    The development team of the free and open source image editor GIMP released GIMP 2.10.10 yesterday to the public. GIMP 2.10.10 is the first stable release of the program in 2019; the last release dates back to November 2018.

    GIMP is a cross-platform open source image editor that is available for Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. We have followed the development of GIMP since our initial review of the application in 2005 on Windows and on Linux. Ghacks writer Jack Wallen published several GIMP tutorials here on this site in the past that offered tips on using layers, adding brushes, or changing the perspective of images.

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