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4 use cases for Linux desktops in the enterprise

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Linux

Access to specific applications. Organizations that run certain applications, such as high-end 3D graphics design and rendering, often choose Linux for desktops. Other specialized applications that may warrant a Linux desktop include financial modeling, data analytics, finite element design and other CPU-intensive tasks. In these scenarios, Linux offers improved performance, a common interface with related servers or supercomputers and an ongoing and data-intensive pipeline operation.

User preference. Certain power users with specialized skills may simply demand Linux for their desktops. Software developers or system administrators may work on Linux-based systems on a daily basis. It often makes sense for these users to run Linux on their desktops as well.

Some organizations adopt Linux for the desktop as a matter of preference and policy. Google, for example, provides and maintains its own Linux distribution, Goobuntu, for its staff to use.

Security, privacy or confidentiality. Linux is generally regarded as easier to maintain and more secure than Windows. The U.S. Department of Defense, for example, developed Lightweight Portable Security Linux, a Linux-based OS that government staff can use to log into secure networks from external and untrusted PCs. Users can install the OS on any PC from plug-in media such as a USB flash drive. The OS establishes and maintains a secure connection into the organization's networks and leaves no footprint behind when users shut it down.

Other Linux distributions such as Tails, IprediaOS, Whonix, Discreete Linux and the Qubes OS are designed specifically to meet stringent security requirements. Some organizations may decide that such options are just what they need to establish and maintain the highest possible security levels.

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Also: Chrome 75 Dev brings USB support to Linux applications [Ed: Google reinventing the wheel here; it used Gentoo GNU/Linux to build ChromeOS and now it gradually 'gives back' what it took (or locked) away]

Chrome OS 75 brings full USB support for Linux apps

  • Chrome OS 75 brings full USB support for Linux apps

    Last year, Chrome OS received an update to add in official support for Linux applications. The initial support was very rough around the edges, to say the least, but since then the company has been working hard to fix things up and make it more user-friendly. With each update for this newly added support to the platform, we are seeing an increase in the number of Linux apps that can be used. The latest addition is full USB support for Linux applications on version 75 of Chrome OS.

Chrome OS 75 has full USB support in Linux apps

Linux on Desktop/:Laptop

  • Chrome OS 75 adds USB device support for Linux, including Android phone debugging

    We knew this feature was in the works as the Stable Channel of Chrome OS 73 brought a menu option for USB Device management. while Chrome OS 72 added USB storage for Linux apps.
    Keith Myers noted the addition of USB device support for Linux on a Chromebook and did some testing with his 3D Printer, an Arduino board and a Intel Movidius Compute Stick. This feature is important for those who want to control, pass or read data to some type of external USB device from the Linux container. Keith noted some functions that Chrome OS 75 breaks as well, which is to be expected in the fast-changing Canary channel.
    Since I dabble with small computing devices myself – my CS group is extending a “pancreas in the cloud” project using a Raspberry Pi, for example – I decided to test some additional features that would be super important for many folks: the Android Debug Bridge (ADB) that lets you modify an Android phone or tablet to install custom software or recovery images.

  • s The Linux Desktop In Trouble?

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