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Free Software in Cryptocurrency and Blockchain

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OSS
  • A Look at the Blockstream Company & Their Bitcoin Products & Technology

    Blockstream is a Bitcoin development company that has positioned themselves among the leaders of innovation in the broader industry. Founded by a team of notable cryptographers and Bitcoin developers, Blockstream offers a suite of open-source technology and projects designed to push the edges of a novel industry.

    Founded in 2014, Blockstream has raised $90 million from investors such as Blockchain Capital, Reid Hoffman, and Khosla Ventures.

  • Blockchain jobs remain unfilled, while skilled workers are being poached
  • PolyCash Aims To Disrupt The Betting Industry With Open Source Software

    PolyCash allows anyone to create secure betting applications on the blockchain. Many projects have launched which incorporate aspects of blockchain & cryptocurrencies with betting. But most of these projects maintain a traditional business model in which the house earns money by charging fees on each bet.

  • Crypto Lender Dharma Officially Launches on Ethereum Blockchain

    Opportunities to earn interest on your crypto are increasing, and Dharma is the latest to enter the fray.

    Announced Monday, lending startup Dharma is now open to everyone. Lenders and borrowers are matched peer-to-peer to set up crypto lending terms in a non-custodial fashion, governed by Dharma’s smart contracts.

    Dharma will differentiate itself from others in the market by offering depositors a fixed rate of return on the crypto they make available to lend.

  • Eric Voorhees compares trust in politicians to open source code

    Early Bitcoin advocate Eric Voorhees has said that “by holding Bitcoin, you are ultimately trusting open source code” in a dig at political systems all around the world.

    Political trust levels are currently plummeting. In countries like Venezuela, we can see political turmoil spilling into the lives of citizens who are now fleeing in droves across the borders. Also highly ranked on the list of politically unstable countries are Brazil, Ukraine, and Turkey, who have all seen major surprises in their recent elections.

  • Open source DEX protocol Loopring adds cryptography to technology mix

    Brecht Devos, protocol development lead, Loopring, said, “A number of hurdles have delayed the adoption of DEXs to date, including, but not limited to, a lack of scalability. However, there’s no doubting that decentralized exchanges represent the future of crypto trading, addressing, as they do, the multitudinous issues faced by users of centralized exchanges in their day-to-day transactions, such as the risk of hacks, personal data leaks, or blocked funds.

  • Ethereum Core Developers Debate Benefits of More Frequent Hard Forks

    A group of ethereum’s veteran open-source developers discussed the subject in a bi-weekly meeting Friday, wherein they aired the possibility that system-wide upgrades, also called hard forks, to the software could be enacted as often as every three months.

    Wanting to “check the temperature,” the developer asking the question explained that certain upcoming ethereum improvement proposals (EIPs) such as state rents would require multiple upgrades sequentially spaced out for full effect.

  • Digital Asset open sources ISDA derivatives blockchain code

    In February the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (ISDA) released version two of its Common Domain Model (CDM) which aims to standardize the coding of derivatives trade events and processes. Today Digital Asset announced that it’s working with ISDA on an open source code library that implements the CDM in Digital Asset’s smart contracting language DAML.

    The aim of implementing the CDM across the derivatives sector is to save money, and the savings could be as much as $2.5 billion. Last year Ledger Insights spoke to Lee Braine from the Chief Technology Office at Barclays about ISDA’s new standard. “Across the post-trade derivatives industry, there is infrastructure deployed that is too complex for its current purpose. And the proposal is analogous to pressing a technology ‘reset button’ allowing you to go back and radically simplify the nature of that infrastructure.”

  • Blockchain Set to Revolutionize the Open Source Movement

    It is evident that open source has transformed the current world. Developers rely extensively on open source software since it dominates the developer infrastructure. From the many operating systems like Linux in the cloud to databases like MongoDB, MySQL, and Redis, open source is there. Also, the movement dominates the programming languages themselves like Python, C, Javascript, PHP, and Java.

    Open source is also good for the consumers featuring in their phones, Android, to their method of web access like Firefox and Chrome. Hence, it makes technology more accessible and open which enables anyone to build anything.

  • Web 3.0 Accelerates As Leading Browser Expands Crypto Wallet Integration and Ethereum Blockchain Support

    Web 3.0 browser Opera has released its latest update, Reborn 3, with new features including direct access to decentralized applications (DApps) on the Ethereum blockchain, an enhanced built-in VPN service, ad blocker, snapshot tool and design changes. Opera’s Reborn 3 also includes a native cryptocurrency wallet for Windows, macOS and Linux, a follow-up to the crypto wallet integration on Opera’s Android app in December 2018.

  • IOTA To Replace Its Coordinator With An Open Source Version Of Coordinator On Mainnet

    The first open source ledger built to power the future of internet of things, IOTA is in a lot of use previously, right from waste management to green energy solutions. And now with the development of Coordicide, the platform may get a lot more transparent.

    Coordicide is actually the effort of removing the Coordinator from the IOTA networks and its research stage. For developing the Coordicide, IOTA is making the inner workings of the current network set-up fully transparent. IOTA aims to do this with an open-sourced version of the Coordinator running on Mainnet.

  • Altcoin News: IOTA to Replace Coordinator With Open Source Version

    IOTA’s technology has been put to a lot of use in the last few months, from waste management to green energy solutions. Now, it is about to become much more transparent with the development of the Coordicide.

    In an April 8, 2019 blog post, the firm gave some more insight into the development of Coordicide and the changes that will be made in that regard in the near future. First, it was explained what exactly the Coordicide is. According to the post, it is a deliberate effort to remove the Coordinator from the IOTA networks and is its research stage.

    [...]

    This open source version of the coordinator is called the Compass and was initially released some months back and allowed the opening of a private network, running of tests, and development PoCs. So far, the Compass has been tested on the spamnet and devnet and is now ready to be moved to the mainnet. IOTA has stated that using an open source version of the coordinator will make the network more transparent while improving it.

More in Tux Machines

Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 released

The Netrunner Team is happy to announce the immediate availability of Netrunner Rolling 2019.04 – 64bit ISO. Read more

Skrooge 2.19.0 released

The Skrooge Team announces the release 2.19.0 version of its popular Personal Finances Manager based on KDE Frameworks. Read more

Libreoffice vs Apache OpenOffice: how to choose the right free office suite for you

When it comes to free office software, there are two main choices: LibreOffice and OpenOffice (or, to give it its proper name, Apache OpenOffice). The two are remarkably similar, so how can you choose the right one for you? First, it's worth thinking carefully about whether you need desktop office software at all. Provided you have an internet connection, Google Docs, Sheets and Slides might offer everything you need, without the need to install anything, and with the extra bonus that everything you create will be automatically saved to the cloud. No more lost documents, or having to email work to yourself. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Plop Linux 19.1 released
  • How do you say SUSE?
    SUSECON 2019 has come and gone and was definitely one for the books. Whether you were able to attend the event in person or not, you can still view plenty of videos and content that was shared at the event. One of my favorite videos from the week was “How do you say SUSE” -which comically reminded attendees how to properly say “SUSE.” Don’t quite know exactly how to pronounce SUSE? We’ve got you covered….Broadway musical style. The keynote videos from each day are not to be missed as well as the series of amazing music parody videos that have recently been created. One of the major take-a-ways this year was the recent announcement that as of March 15, not only did SUSE become an independent company, we are now the largest independent open source company in the industry.
  • In 2019, Most Linux Distributions Still Aren't Restricting Dmesg Access
    Going back to the late Linux 2.6 kernel days has been the CONFIG_DMESG_RESTRICT (or for the past number of years, renamed to CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT) Kconfig option to restrict access to dmesg in the name of security and not allowing unprivileged users from accessing this system log. While it's been brought up from time to time, Linux distributions are still generally allowing any user access to dmesg even though it may contain information that could help bad actors exploit the system. The primary motivation of CONFIG_SECURITY_DMESG_RESTRICT and an associated sysctl tunable as well (dmesg_restrict) is for restricting access to dmesg so unprivileged users can't see the syslog to avoid possible kernel memory address exposures among other potentially sensitive information that could be leaked about the kernel to help anyone trying to exploit the system. But even with these options being available for years, most Linux distributions leave dmesg open to any user.
  • Is Email Making Professors Stupid?
     

    I can think of at least three strong arguments for why higher education should be that industry, significantly restructuring its work culture to provide professors more uninterrupted time for thinking and teaching, and require less time on email and administrative duties.

  • What is ZIL anyway?
     

    The Infocom ZIL code dump has kicked off a small whirlwind of news articles and blog posts. A lot of them are somewhat hazy on what ZIL is, and how it relates to MDL, Lisp, Z-code, Inform, and the rest of the Golden-Age IF ecosystem.

    So I'm going to talk a lot about it! With examples. But let's go through in chronological order.

  • Death by PowerPoint: the slide that killed seven people

    Edward Tufte’s full report makes for fascinating reading. Since being released in 1987 PowerPoint has grown exponentially to the point where it is now estimated than thirty million PowerPoint presentations are made every day. Yet, PowerPoint is blamed by academics for killing critical thought. Amazon’s CEO Jeff Bezos has banned it from meetings. Typing text on a screen and reading it out loud does not count as teaching. An audience reading text off the screen does not count as learning. Imagine if the engineers had put up a slide with just: “foam strike more than 600 times bigger than test data.” Maybe NASA would have listened. Maybe they wouldn’t have attempted re-entry. Next time you’re asked to give a talk remember Columbia. Don’t just jump to your laptop and write out slides of text. Think about your message. Don’t let that message be lost amongst text. Death by PowerPoint is a real thing. Sometimes literally.