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FlexiWAN Adopts an 'Open' Slant

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OSS
Security
  • Stealthy Start-Up Portends 'Second Wave of SD-WAN'
  • The First SD-WAN Open Source Driving the Second Wave of SD-WAN by flexiWAN
  • flexiWAN Launches With Open Source SD-WAN Architecture

    Will open source usher in the second-wave of SD-WAN? Startup flexiWAN's co-founder and CEO Amir Zmora thinks so.

  • FlexiWAN soft launches SD-WAN software based on open source architecture

    Israel-based start-up FlexiWAN has started conducting proof-of-concept trials to test its SD-WAN software product, which aims to use open source architecture as a differentiator. With this approach, the company hopes to attract IT managers by providing more control over the capabilities and elements within their networks.

  • FlexiWAN pushes SD-WAN into an open source architecture

    Among the goals of flexiWAN co-founder and CEO Amir Zmora is to give enterprises and service providers the ability to differentiate their SD-WAN services instead of relying on SD-WAN vendors to define them.

    After years of working in the VoIP space, and after attending numerous industry conferences where SD-WAN was a hot topic, Zmora said that he came to the realization that SD-WAN solutions were closed black boxes that didn't enable innovation.

    [...]

    Chua said he has been waiting to see an open-source approach to SD-WAN. He said there were two elements to SD-WAN; the SD-WAN element and the universal CPE element.

    "So, on the SD-WAN side of things, which is, I think, where he's (Zmora) starting, there are elements in place in open source where you can try to cobble things together to make an SD-WAN solution," Chua said. "So, there's IPSec or an open SSL VPN, firewalls, things like that.

    "What's missing is that cloud control policy elements that aren't quite there. So, there's no open source equivalent, that I know of, on the whole cloud control side for the centralized policies, centralized configuration and of all the different SD-WAN components out there."

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