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Security Leftovers

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Security
  • How secure are your containerized apps? [Ed: Why does SJVN promote the Microsoft-connected anti-FOSS firm Snyk?]
  • IPFire 2.23 - Core Update 131 is available for testing

    Finally, the next major version of IPFire is ready to testing. We consider our new Intrusion Prevention System such an important change, that we are calling it "IPFire 2.23" from now on. This update also contains a number of other bug fixes and enhancements.

  • How hacking threats spurred secret U.S. blacklist

    U.S. energy regulators are pursuing a risky plan to share with electric utilities a secret "don't buy" list of foreign technology suppliers, according to multiple sources.

    The move reflects the federal government's growing concern that hackers and foreign spies are targeting America's vital energy infrastructure. And it's also raised new questions about the value of top-secret U.S. intelligence if it can't get into the hands of power industry executives who can act on it to avoid high-risk vendors.

    Joseph McClelland, director of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Office of Energy Infrastructure Security, told a Department of Energy advisory committee last month that officials are working on "an open-source procurement list" for utilities to use when deciding where to source their software and equipment.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Best Command-Line FTP Clients for Linux

File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a network protocol used for transferring files between a client and a server on a computer network. The very first FTP applications were made for the command line before GUI Operating Systems even became a thing and while there are several GUI FTP clients, developers still make CLI-based FTP clients for users who prefer using the old method. Here’s a list of the best command-line based FTP clients for Linux. Read more

Why Windows Containers Are Less Attractive Than Linux Containers

The fact that you can run Docker containers on Windows as well as Linux is amazing. Yet, I sometimes struggle to see a clear use case for Windows containers. Compared to Linux containers, there are fewer obvious reasons to run containers on Windows. I know that’s a somewhat controversial statement, so let me walk through the various reasons why Windows containers are much less attractive than Linux containers. Read more Also: Streamlining Software Development and Distribution with Containers [Ed: Paid-for SPAM from EMC. “Buying the news”… the new “biz model”? Companies literally buying not only the narratives but also the space and the staff?]

Android and GNU/Linux Software on Chrome OS

  • Chrome OS 76 adds a flag to enable GPU support for Linux apps
    The new feature was first noticed by Keith I Myers. It is available in Chrome OS 76.0.3789.0, which is the first dev build of Chrome OS 76. It goes without saying that the feature is unstable right now. It is in the very early stages, so bugs and stability issues are to be expected. Also, keep in mind that GPU acceleration is only supported on a handful of Chromebooks...
  • Google working on new way to run Android apps in Chrome OS called ‘ARCVM’
    For the past few years, it’s been possible on many Chromebooks to install the Play Store and run Android apps. This opened the door for Chromebooks to become more than just glorified web browsers. Now, Google is looking to make some major under-the-hood changes to Chrome OS’s Android apps support, which may allow for a long-requested feature.