Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The Proprietary Software Lobby Against FOSS/Copyleft

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS
  • 5 factors for using open source code in proprietary software [Ed: As usual, treating copyleft as a nuisnace rather than a moral feature]

    Developers can easily obtain, modify and integrate countless open source code packages into diverse software projects. Using open source code to enable basic features and processes in a proprietary software project can shave time off of development cycles and free code creators to focus on core and business-enabling functionality.

    While open source elements confer tangible benefits for software development projects, they can impose challenges and limitations on a proprietary application, especially if the project is intended for commercial use. Organizations should evaluate the management and integration of software components from other creators, their project priorities, liabilities, licensing and security before selecting open source code for a project.

    [...]

    While open source software is free to obtain, change and otherwise work with, it is not in the public domain. Open source software is released under a license, such as Apache License 2.0; BSD license; GNU General Public License (GPL), GNU Library, or Lesser GPL; MIT License; or Mozilla Public License 2.0. Each license outlines the terms of use and distribution.

    Generally, open source software licenses do not significantly restrict a business's ability to acquire and use them. So, a proprietary and commercial software product can rely on open source components.

    However, businesses must know if and how a license can cause problems. The GNU GPL requires users to release any derivative works under the same GNU GPL license. If a business obtains and modifies open source code under GNU GPL, it must copyleft the modified code -- meaning release it to open source, as well.

  • Open source security: The risk issue is unpatched software, not open source use [Ed: Microsoft 'proxy' Black Duck still dodges an honest discussion about back doors that cannot be patched because they are there by design in proprietary software (like everything from Microsoft)

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Programming: CI/CD and 'DevRel'

  • CloudBees and Google Cloud Partner to Accelerate Application Development on Anthos

    Respective leaders in DevOps and cloud computing are partnering to provide end-to-end application development automation from source to production...

  • Codefresh’s More Robust, Open Source Marketplace Makes Coding Easier, Faster, More Secure

    First deployed in December 2018, the Codefresh Marketplace makes it easier for code developers to find commands without having to learn a proprietary API – every step, browsable in the pipeline builder, is a simple Docker image. The Marketplace contains a more robust set of pipeline steps provided both by Codefresh and partners, such as Blue-Green and Canary deployment steps for Kubernetes, Aqua security scanning, and Helm package and deployment. All plugins are open source and users can contribute to the collection by creating a new plugin.

  • Codefresh freshens produce at the Kubernetes code marketplace

    Codefresh is the first Kubernetes-native CI/CD technology, with CI denoting Continuous Integration and CD denoting Continuous Delivery, obviously. The organisation has this month worked to improve its open source marketplace with features that focus on faster code deployment. First deployed in December 2018, the Codefresh Marketplace [kind of like an app store] allows developers to find commands without having to learn a proprietary API — this is because every step, which is browsable in the pipeline builder, is a simple Docker image.

  • DevOps World | Jenkins World: CircleCI orbs, DevOps Institute’s Ambassador Program, and Codefresh Marketplace

    DevOps and Jenkins is on full display this week at CloudBees’ DevOps World | Jenkins World taking place in San Francisco. In addition to the DevOps thought leaders and community members coming together to learn, explore and help shape the next generation of Jenkins and DevOps, a number of organizations took the opportunity to reveal new products. [...] SmartBear revealed TestEngine, a new solution designed to automate test execution in CI/CD environments. In addition, the company announced ReadyAPI 2.8 to accelerate functional, security and load testing of RESTful, SOAP, GraphQL and other web services. The new tools are aimed at accelerating API delivery. Users can now execute ReadyAPI, SoapUI Pro and SoapUI Open Source tests simultaneously on a central source that’s integrated into their development processes. This tackles the challenges that Agile and DevOps teams have such as complex deployments, large regression suites, and global development teams, according to SmartBear in a post.

  • What Is Developer Relations?

    Matthew Broberg, Advocate and Editor at opensource.com says that in practice the implementation of DevRel has been far from consistent. "DevRel, in theory, is the intersection of three disciplines: engineering, marketing, and community management," he says. "In practice, DevRel applies to a wildly popular set of job titles with wildly different expectations across different organizations." [...] Rebecca Fitzhugh, Principal Technologist at Rubrik agrees. "While there is certainly a marketing component when representing the company to the customer and community, it's equally about representing the customer to the company," she says. "Our DevRel team brings feedback from our customers to the product and engineering team in order to drive a better developer experience against our product's APIs."

Network transparency with Wayland: Final report.

The goal of this 2019 Google Summer of Code project is to develop a tool with which to transparently proxy applications that use the Wayland protocol to be displayed by compositors. Unlike the original X protocol, only part of the data needed to display an application is transferred over the application's connection to the compositor; instead, large information transfers are made by sharing file descriptors over the (Unix socket) connection, and updating the resources associated with the file descriptors. Converting this side channel information to something that can be sent over a single data stream is the core of this work. The proxy program I have developed for the project is called Waypipe. It can currently be found at gitlab.freedesktop.org/mstoeckl/waypipe. (I am currently looking for a better stable path at which to place the project; the preceding URL will be updated once this is done.) A few distributions have already packaged the program; see here; alternatively, to build and run the project, follow the instructions in the README and the man page. My work is clearly identified by the commit logs, and amounts to roughly ten thousand lines of C code, and a few hundred of Python. Read more Also: Vulkan 1.1.120 Released As The Newest Maintenance Release

The ClockworkPi GameShell is a super fun DIY spin on portable gaming

Portable consoles are hardly new, and thanks to the Switch, they’re basically the most popular gaming devices in the world. But ClockworkPi’s GameShell is something totally unique, and entirely refreshing when it comes to gaming on the go. This clever DIY console kit provides everything you need to assemble your own pocket gaming machine at home, running Linux-based open-source software and using an open-source hardware design that welcomes future customization. The GameShell is the result of a successful Kickstarter campaign, which began shipping to its backers last year and is now available to buy either direct from the company or from Amazon. The $159.99 ( on sale for $139.99 as of this writing) includes everything you need to build the console, like the ClockworkPi quad-core Cortex A7 motherboard with integrated Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and 1GB of DDR3 RAM — but it comes unassembled. Read more