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Server: Google, Docker, MontaVista, LF, Glusterfs vs. Ceph, Kubebuilder and SUSE

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  • Google Cloud Sandbox Environments On Demand with Playground

    We’ve been talking about it for a while now during our Weekly Updates, and we’re finally ready to reveal our Google Sandbox Environment! Like our AWS environments, our Google environments are created on demand and allow you to work in a hassle-free, and compliance-friendly environment. These Google Playground Cloud Sandbox environments are available for all of our individual and business accounts!

  • Rob Bearden To Replace Steve Singh As Docker CEO

    Steve Singh is stepping down as Docker CEO after two years at the helm. Hortonworks CEO Rob Bearden will be taking over to lead the company. Bearden is said to have been working closely with Singh over the last several months as a potential candidate to join the board and as a consultant to the executive team.

    In his new role at Docker, Rob will accelerate Docker’s enterprise go-to-market strategy while continuing to fuel innovation in the technologies and products that drive digital transformation in an increasingly hybrid cloud world. Rob will also serve on Docker’s board of directors.

  • MontaVista Software Announces Commercial Support For Clear Linux OS
  • LF Edge Momentum Continues with Project EVE Seed Code, Project Demonstrations at IoT World and New Members

    LF Edge, an umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced continued project momentum. Project Edge Virtualization Engine (EVE) receives initial seed code from LF Edge founding member ZEDEDA, as the community showcases a range of edge/IoT application demonstrations, from connected cars to wind turbines, on-site at IoT World.

    Additionally, LF Edge welcomes new Associate and Liaison member organizations Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC), the LIONS Center at the Pennsylvania State University, OTAinfo, and University of New Hampshire’s Interoperability Lab (UNH-IOL).

    “We are excited to see the LF community continue to collaborate on building unified edge solutions,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager,  Networking, IoT and Edge Computing, the Linux Foundation. “We appreciate ZEDEDA’s leadership in helping us advance On-Prem Edge IoT with initiatives like Project EVE, and are eager to showcase the broad capabilities of LF Edge onsite in Santa Clara while welcoming our newest members.”

  • OPNFV Hunter Delivers Test Tools, CI/CD Framework to Enable Common NFVI for Verifying VNFs

    LF Networking (LFN), which facilitates collaboration and operational excellence across open networking projects, today announced the availability of OPNFV ?Hunter,? the platform?s eighth release. Hunter advances OPNFV?s system level integration, deployment, and testing to collaboratively build a common industry Network Functions Virtualization Infrastructure (NFVI) that will reduce Communication Service Provider (CSP) and Virtual Network Function (VNF) vendor efforts to verify VNFs against different NFVI platforms.

    Open Platform for NFV (OPNFV) is a project and community that facilitates a common NFVI, continuous integration (CI) with upstream projects, stand-alone testing toolsets, and a compliance and verification program for industry-wide testing and integration to accelerate the transformation of enterprise and service provider networks.  

    ?The latest OPNFV release sets the stage for a real turning point in the maturity of the platform,? said Heather Kirksey, vice president, Community & Ecosystem Development, the Linux Foundation. ?With continued evolution in areas of testing, verification, and CI/CD, OPNFV is on its way to enable a common NFVI stack that will meet the needs of operators. We are working  in collaboration with both global operators as well as the GSMA, and I am incredibly excited to see the community work to provide the resources needed to accelerate network transformation across the ecosystem.?

  • Glusterfs vs. Ceph: Which Wins the Storage War?

    Storing data at scale isn?t like saving a file on your hard drive. It requires a software manager to keep track of all the bits that make up your company?s files. That?s where distributed storage management packages like Ceph and Gluster come into place.

    Ceph and Gluster are both systems used for managing distributed storage. Both are considered software-defined storage, meaning they?re largely hardware-agnostic. They organize the bits that make up your data using their own underlying infrastructure, which is what defines this choice: what underlying framework do you want supporting your data?

    That?s a decision you want to make based on the type of data you?re storing, how that data is accessed, and where that data lives. Ceph and GlusterFS are both good choices, but their ideal applications are subtly different.

  • Developing Kubernetes API Extensions And Operators - Kubebuilder Vs Operator Kit Vs Metacontroller

    As more teams adopt Kubernetes in production, specific use cases and needs have emerged that build on the core feature set of the project. Rather than attempt to fit every requirement in Kubernetes itself, the community has worked towards building an extension framework to enable developers to build support for these different scenarios. Examples of customizing Kubernetes include configuring different network or storage plugins, restricting what container images can be run inside Pods and other admission policies, or creating API extensions for automating common cluster operations. Let?s take a deeper look at the latter type of extension.

  • eCube Systems Announces NXTera 7.1 Cloud-Enabled Entera RPC Middleware Certified on Suse Linux Enterprise 12

    eCube Systems, a leading provider of middleware modernization, integration and management solutions, announced the release of NXTera™ 7.1 High Performance RPC Middleware for SUSE Linux Enterprise 12. NXTera 7.1 is the official Borland sanctioned replacement middleware for Entera and includes modern tools for DevOps, advanced naming services with NAT support, JDBC database access for Entera servers, Eclipse workbench for COBOL, FORTRAN, C and C# language integration; and webservice enhancements to its generation of C, C# and JAVA services interfaces and clients.

More in Tux Machines

Apache Rya matures open source triple store database

The open source Apache Rya database effort is continuing to move forward as it reaches a new level of project maturity and acceptance. Rya (pronounced "ree-uh") is an RDF (resource description framework) triple store database. The project started at the U.S. government's Laboratory for Telecommunication Sciences with an initial research paper published in 2012. The project joined the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in 2015 as an incubated project, and in September 2019 achieved what is known as Top-Level Project status. The Top-Level status is an indication and validation of the project's maturity, code quality and community. The ASF is home to Hadoop, Spark and other widely used database and data management programs. Read more Also: Yahoo Groups is being prepared for shutdown, with all stored archives to be deleted on Dec 14

The Spectre Mitigation Impact For Intel Ice Lake With Core i7-1065G7

For those wondering if -- or how much -- of a performance impact mitigations still make regarding Spectre for Intel's long-awaited 10nm+ Ice Lake processors, here is the rundown on the mitigation state and the performance impact. One of the areas that Phoronix readers have requested testing on with the recent purchase of the Dell XPS 7390 with Core i7 1065G7 is regarding the mitigation state and performance. Ice Lake with its Sunny Cove microarchitecture -- similar to Cascade Lake -- is no longer affected by Meltdown, MDS, or L1TF / Foreshadow. Read more

Networking SBCs run Linux on quad -A53 and -A72 NXP LS chips

Forlinx’s sandwich-style OK1043A-C and OK1046A SBCs run Linux on NXP’s quad -A53 LS1043A and quad -A72 LS1046A SoCs, respectively, and offer a 10GbE port and up to 6x GbE ports with optional SFP. Forlinx has posted product pages for two similar COM Express modules and carrier boards that run Linux on NXP’s networking focused LS series processors. The FET1043A-C module taps the up to 1.6GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A53 LS1043A while the FET1046A-C uses the up to 1.8GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A72 LS1046A. All the processors are headless — without GPUs. Read more

Security: WireGuard, Birds and Updates

  • WireGuard Restored In Android's Google Play Store After Brief But Controversial Removal

    After Google dropped the open-source WireGuard app from their Play Store since it contained a donation link, the app has now been restored within Google's software store for Android users but without the donation option. The WireGuard app for Android makes it easy to setup the secure VPN tunnel software on mobile devices, similar to its port to iOS and other platforms. The WireGuard apps are free but have included a donation link to the WireGuard website should anyone wish to optionally make a donation to support the development of this very promising network tech.

  • Letting Birds scooters fly free

    At that point I had everything I need to write a simple app to unlock the scooters, and it worked! For about 2 minutes, at which point the network would notice that the scooter was unlocked when it should be locked and sent a lock command to force disable the scooter again. Ah well. So, what else could I do? The next thing I tried was just modifying some STM firmware and flashing it onto a board. It still booted, indicating that there was no sort of verified boot process. Remember what I mentioned about the throttle being hooked through the STM32's analogue to digital converters[3]? A bit of hacking later and I had a board that would appear to work normally, but about a minute after starting the ride would cut the throttle. Alternative options are left as an exercise for the reader. Finally, there was the component I hadn't really looked at yet. The Quectel modem actually contains its own application processor that runs Linux, making it significantly more powerful than any of the chips actually running the scooter application[4]. The STM communicates with the modem over serial, sending it an AT command asking it to make an SSL connection to a remote endpoint. It then uses further AT commands to send data over this SSL connection, allowing it to talk to the internet without having any sort of IP stack. Figuring out just what was going over this connection was made slightly difficult by virtue of all the debug functionality having been ripped out of the STM's firmware, so in the end I took a more brute force approach - I identified the address of the function that sends data to the modem, hooked up OpenOCD to the SWD pins on the STM, ran OpenOCD's gdb stub, attached gdb, set a breakpoint for that function and then dumped the arguments being passed to that function. A couple of minutes later and I had a full transaction between the scooter and the remote. The scooter authenticates against the remote endpoint by sending its serial number and IMEI. You need to send both, but the IMEI didn't seem to need to be associated with the serial number at all. New connections seemed to take precedence over existing connections, so it would be simple to just pretend to be every scooter and hijack all the connections, resulting in scooter unlock commands being sent to you rather than to the scooter or allowing someone to send fake GPS data and make it impossible for users to find scooters.

  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (poppler, sudo, and wordpress), Oracle (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Red Hat (java-1.8.0-openjdk), Scientific Linux (java-1.8.0-openjdk, java-11-openjdk, and kernel), and SUSE (kernel and postgresql10).