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Servers: Facebook, Red Hat, Enarx, KubeCon and SUSE

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  • Instagram: What’s the Technology Behind This Social Media Platform?

    It runs “Natty Narwhal (Ubuntu Linux version 11.04) on Amazon EC2. Though the developers found out that lower versions of Ubuntu had varieties of random freezing incidents on Amazon EC2, they are certain the Linux 11.04 has been firm.

  • Four key tactics to better deliver APIs and improve customer experience through open banking

    Digital leaders are embracing open banking as a cornerstone to their banking distribution strategy. They are using APIs to connect with partners and bring innovative digital services to their customers who continue to seek better experiences.

    More broadly, customers want banking services that integrate into their digital life, explains Capgemini in its World Retail Banking Report 2018. "That’s why it makes strategic sense for banks to support the API-led economy and collaborate with third-parties to offer new-age services," the report says.

  • Krazy Parties At KubeCon Barcelona

    Are you all set to attend the upcoming KubeCon in Barcelona? They have a jam-packed schedule for technical sessions, workshops, and great talks.

    But this KubeCon is special. “This year we’ll be celebrating Kubernetes’ 5th anniversary!,” said Janet Kuo, Software Engineer at Google, Co-Chair of KubeCon + CloudNativeCon.

  • Announcing Enarx for running sensitive workloads

    Running software is something that most of us do without thinking about it. We run in "on premises"—our own machines—or we run it in the cloud - on somebody else's machines. We don't always think about what those differences mean, or about what assumptions we're making about the securtiy of the data that's being processed, or even of the software that's doing that processing. Specifically, when you run software (a "workload") on a system (a "host") on the cloud or on your own premises, there are lots and lots of layers. You often don't see those layers, but they're there.

  • Monitoring For Organizations At Scale With M3 And Prometheus

    For the past few years Prometheus has solved the monitoring needs of many and it is exceptional at what it does. Being the second project to graduate from CNCF incubation, Prometheus has exploded in popularity and is the monitoring tool of choice for many cloud native adopters. While Prometheus is great at real time monitoring, it was not designed to be a long term persistent store of metrics.

  • MANAGEDKUBE LAUNCHES NEW APPLICATION DEDICATED TO DEMOCRATIZING KUBERNETES INFORMATION, COLLABORATES WITH GOOGLE CLOUD
  • What’s The Right Ingress Controller For My Kubernetes Environment?
  • SUSE Teams Up with Veeam for Data Protection Support

    SUSE and Veeam are teaming up to offer a great solution for your data protection needs. Veeam has just granted their Veeam Ready-Repository (and soon, Veeam Ready-Object) designation to SUSE Enterprise Storage 5.5. Now enterprises get a high-performing and flexible backup target with high scalability. Together, SUSE and Veeam can deliver an extremely cost-effective, flexible, scalable solution for enterprise archive, backup and recovery implementations.

  • KubeCon Barcelona: The New SUSE, and SUSE CaaS Platform.

    In a short while, SUSE will become the largest independently operating open source company in the world. Some have branded this era, “The New SUSE and wow it’s time to see what “The New SUSE” looks like at KubeCon Barcelona. We are here to talk about modern, Kubernetes-based application delivery solutions that you need today. We’ve upped our sponsorship and we’re ready to rock.

  • What is a Kubernetes distribution, and why would you want one?

    Kubernetes (or K8s, if you want to be cool) is currently one of the fastest growing technologies in the world of open source. These days the technology in, and associated with, Kubernetes seems almost endless – and the innovation comes just as fast. Kubernetes was first introduced in 2014 as a brainchild of the citizens and people of Google-landia. 2017 saw Kubernetes start to take off in popularity largely due to an incredibly loyal following of contributors, and by 2018, Kubernetes was looking like a de-facto standard for container orchestration. As of recent, Kubernetes has seen advances in flexibility, governance, storage, and security. As with all things open source, you can just download it from the internet, too – what a time to be alive!!!

More in Tux Machines

Debian: CUPS, LTS and Archival

  • Praise Be CUPS Driverless Printing

    Last Tuesday, I finally got to start updating $work's many desktop computers to Debian Buster. I use Puppet to manage them remotely, so major upgrades basically mean reinstalling machines from scratch and running Puppet. Over the years, the main upgrade hurdle has always been making our very large and very complicated printers work on Debian. Unsurprisingly, the blog posts I have written on that topic are very popular and get me a few 'thank you' emails per month. I'm very happy to say, thanks to CUPS Driverless Printing (CUPS 2.2.2+), all those trials and tribulations are finally over. Printing on Buster just works. Yes yes, even color booklets printed on 11x17 paper folded in 3 stapled in the middle.

  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, August 2019

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • Louis-Philippe Véronneau: Archiving 20 years of online content

    mailman2 is pretty great. You can get a dump of an email list pretty easily and mailman3's web frontend, the lovely hyperkitty, is well, lovely. Importing a legacy mailman2 mbox went without a hitch thanks to the awesome hyperkitty_import importer. Kudos to the Debian Mailman Team for packaging this in Debian for us. But what about cramming a Yahoo! Group mailing list in hyperkitty? I wouldn't recommend it. After way too many hours spent battling character encoding errors I just decided people that wanted to read obscure emails from 2003 would have to deal with broken accents and shit. But hey, it kinda works! Oh, and yes, archiving a Yahoo! Group with an old borken Perl script wasn't an easy task. Hell, I kept getting blacklisted by Yahoo! for scraping too much data to their liking. I ended up patching together the results of multiple runs over a few weeks to get the full mbox and attachments. By the way, if anyone knows how to tell hyperkitty to stop at a certain year (i.e. not display links for 2019 when the list stopped in 2006), please ping me.

Running The AMD "ABBA" Ryzen 3000 Boost Fix Under Linux With 140 Tests

Last week AMD's AGESA "ABBA" update began shipping with a fix to how the boost clock frequencies are handled in hopes of better achieving the rated boost frequencies for Ryzen 3000 series processors. I've been running some tests of an updated ASUS BIOS with this adjusted boost clock behavior to see how it performs under Linux with a Ryzen 9 3900X processor. The AGESA 1.0.0.3 ABBA update has an improved boost clock frequency algorithm along with changes to the idle state handling. This AGESA update should better position AMD Ryzen 3000 processors with the boost clock behavior expected by users with better hitting the maximum boost frequency and doing so more aggressively. Read more

Stable kernels 5.2.16, 4.19.74, and 4.14.145

  • Linux 5.2.16
    I'm announcing the release of the 5.2.16 kernel. All users of the 5.2 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 5.2.y git tree can be found at: git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-stable.git linux-5.2.y and can be browsed at the normal kernel.org git web browser: https://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/stable/linux-s...
  • Linux 4.19.74
  • Linux 4.14.145

Linux Container Technology Explained (Contributed)

State and local governments’ IT departments increasingly rely on DevOps practices and agile development methodologies to improve service delivery and to help maintain a culture of constant collaboration, iteration, and flexibility among all stakeholders and teams. However, when an IT department adopts agile and DevOps practices and methodologies, traditional IT problems still need to be solved. One long-standing problem is “environmental drift,” when the code and configurations for applications and their underlying infrastructure can vary between different environments. State and local IT teams often lack the tools necessary to mitigate the effects of environmental drift, which can hamper collaboration and agility efforts. Read more