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Games: Gallium3D, Google, DXVK and New Titles on GNU/Linux

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Gaming
  • Intel Iris Gallium3D Driver Gets On-Disk Shader Cache Support

    In helping to speed-up game load times when switching to the new Intel "Iris" Gallium3D OpenGL Linux driver and smooth out frame-rates for games sporadically loading shaders, Mesa 19.2-devel has added on-disk shader cache support for the driver.

    Intel's existing "i965" classic Mesa driver has long supported an on-disk shader cache along with the other Mesa OpenGL drivers while now the Gallium3D shader cache functionality has been extended for the new Iris driver.

  • 10 Unknown Google Search Games for You

    Google Search by default has games hidden in it, which is a fact, not many Google users are aware of. Google has compiled some really authentic and entertaining games over a period of time, that can be played in Google.com page itself without having to visit any other Web page.

    Most of these games were made to appear as Google Doodle, in relation with certain anniversaries that have been a remarkable day in history. While some of these games are not available easily because Google Doodle keeps changing.

    However, a few of them continue to be played even today. All you need is to search the game by its name in Google and hit “search” and Voila! The games will appear right in front of your eyes and you can play them right then and there.

    Read on to know about the playable games still available, though hidden within the Google Search.

  • Valve have released a new dedicated mobile Steam Chat application

    Now that Valve have upgraded the chat and friends system in the desktop Steam client, they've also rolled out a brand new dedication mobile application to do the same.

    This isn't the normal Steam mobile application, instead they've oddly decided to split them in two. Touching on that, they said the original Steam mobile application is going to get some upgrades "focused on account security" including better Steam Guard options, like QR codes and a one-touch login.

  • Sci-fi first-person shooter 'Interstellar Marines' continues to live on, with a big update out now

    Interstellar Marines, a once promising sci-fi first-person shooter that slowly died is slowly making a comeback. Update 28 was released just recently, giving it an overhaul in a few places.

  • Valve working on a stand-alone version of the popular Dota Auto Chess

    Dota Auto Chess, a very popular custom game mode for Dota 2 is being turned into a stand-alone game by Valve.

    The Dota 2 arcade is full of interesting games but nothing has really come close to Dota Auto Chess, looking at it right now it has over 125K people playing just this one game mode. It also has over 8 million people subscribed to it, to give you another idea of just how popular it is. Based on player-count, if it manages to keep it for the stand-alone version it would put it into the top-5 games on Steam.

  • Blacksite returns alongside Sirocco for the latest Danger Zone update in Counter-Strike: Global Offensive

    Counter-Strike: Global Offensive's newer Battle Royale mode, Danger Zone, continues to be tweaked and the original map has made a return.

    This should help spice things up a bit, as Blacksite is quite a good map but I've also immensely enjoyed playing on the newer and more open Sirocco map. Thankfully, Valve have now enabled Danger Zone for both maps together as a "time-based map rotation" as you can see below:

  • DXVK 1.2.1 really does improve Overwatch quite a lot on Linux with NVIDIA

    In the latest release of DXVK 1.2.1 that was released last week, it included a note about improved GPU utilization. They certainly weren’t kidding, with Overwatch now performing even better on Linux with Wine.

    When I previously wrote about it, I said I was in shock at how well you could play Overwatch on Linux thanks to Wine, DXVK and a little help from Lutris. I included a video in the previous article to show it off, which showed the framerate hardly going above 100FPS and often dipped down to around 60FPS. Checking back, previous versions of DXVK didn’t let my NVIDIA 980ti GPU utilization go above 80%.

  • The absolutely insane and pretty awesome twin-stick shooter 'BulletRage' is now on Kickstarter

    BulletRage is a game I firmly think is worth supporting, as the developer has had Linux support in very early and it does seem like a pretty awesome twin-stick shooter.

More in Tux Machines

Security: Mozilla Patch for Firefox and Getting Started with OpenSSL

  • Zero-Day Flaw In Firefox Is Getting Exploited By Hackers; Update Now!
    Mozilla has issued a warning of a zero-day flaw in Firefox browser that is currently being exploited in the wild. But the good news is that an emergency patch has been released for the same so you should update your browser now! The vulnerability was discovered by Google’s Project Zero security team...
  • Security vulnerabilities fixed in Firefox 67.0.3 and Firefox ESR 60.7.1
    A type confusion vulnerability can occur when manipulating JavaScript objects due to issues in Array.pop. This can allow for an exploitable crash. We are aware of targeted attacks in the wild abusing this flaw.
  • Getting started with OpenSSL: Cryptography basics
    This article is the first of two on cryptography basics using OpenSSL, a production-grade library and toolkit popular on Linux and other systems. (To install the most recent version of OpenSSL, see here.) OpenSSL utilities are available at the command line, and programs can call functions from the OpenSSL libraries. The sample program for this article is in C, the source language for the OpenSSL libraries. The two articles in this series cover—collectively—cryptographic hashes, digital signatures, encryption and decryption, and digital certificates. You can find the code and command-line examples in a ZIP file from my website. Let’s start with a review of the SSL in the OpenSSL name.

Python: Leading, Developing for Android and New RCs

  • Leading in the Python community
    Naomi began her career in the Classics; she earned a PhD in Latin and Ancient Greek with a minor in Indo-European Linguistics, as she says, "several decades ago." While teaching Latin at a private school, she began tinkering with computers, learning to code and to take machines apart to do upgrades and repairs. She started working with open source software in 1995 with Yggdrasil Linux and helped launch the Fort Wayne, Indiana, Linux User Group.
  • What’s the Best Language for Android App Developers: Java or Python?
    Few things can be so divisive among developers as their choice of programming languages. Developers will promote one over the other, often touting their chosen language’s purity, speed, elegance, efficiency, power, portability, compatibility or any number of other features. Android app developers are no exception, with many developers divided between using Java or Python to develop their applications. Let’s look at these two languages and see which is best for Android app developers.
  • Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available
    Python 3.7.4rc1 and 3.6.9rc1 are now available. 3.7.4rc1 is the release preview of the next maintenance release of Python 3.7, the latest feature release of Python. 3.6.9rc1 is the release preview of the first security-fix release of Python 3.6. Assuming no critical problems are found prior to 2019-06-28, no code changes are planned between these release candidates and the final releases. These release candidates are intended to give you the opportunity to test the new security and bug fixes in 3.7.4 and security fixes in 3.6.9. We strongly encourage you to test your projects and report issues found to bugs.python.org as soon as possible. Please keep in mind that these are preview releases and, thus, their use is not recommended for production environments.

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Android Leftovers